Caution October 19, 2023

Worldwide caution, update january 10, 2024, information for u.s. citizens in the middle east.

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Peru Traveler View

Travel health notices, vaccines and medicines, non-vaccine-preventable diseases, stay healthy and safe.

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After Your Trip

Map - Peru

There are no notices currently in effect for Peru.

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Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor at least a month before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need. If you or your doctor need help finding a location that provides certain vaccines or medicines, visit the Find a Clinic page.

Routine vaccines

Recommendations.

Make sure you are up-to-date on all routine vaccines before every trip. Some of these vaccines include

  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR)

Immunization schedules

All eligible travelers should be up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines. Please see  Your COVID-19 Vaccination  for more information. 

COVID-19 vaccine

Hepatitis A

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers one year old or older going to Peru.

Infants 6 to 11 months old should also be vaccinated against Hepatitis A. The dose does not count toward the routine 2-dose series.

Travelers allergic to a vaccine component or who are younger than 6 months should receive a single dose of immune globulin, which provides effective protection for up to 2 months depending on dosage given.

Unvaccinated travelers who are over 40 years old, immunocompromised, or have chronic medical conditions planning to depart to a risk area in less than 2 weeks should get the initial dose of vaccine and at the same appointment receive immune globulin.

Hepatitis A - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep A

Hepatitis B

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers younger than 60 years old traveling to Peru. Unvaccinated travelers 60 years and older may get vaccinated before traveling to Peru.

Hepatitis B - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep B

CDC recommends that travelers going to certain areas of Peru take prescription medicine to prevent malaria. Depending on the medicine you take, you will need to start taking this medicine multiple days before your trip, as well as during and after your trip. Talk to your doctor about which malaria medication you should take.

Find  country-specific information  about malaria.

Malaria - CDC Yellow Book

Considerations when choosing a drug for malaria prophylaxis (CDC Yellow Book)

Malaria information for Peru.

Infants 6 to 11 months old traveling internationally should get 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine before travel. This dose does not count as part of the routine childhood vaccination series.

Measles (Rubeola) - CDC Yellow Book

Rabid dogs are commonly found in Peru. If you are bitten or scratched by a dog or other mammal while in Peru, there may be limited or no rabies treatment available. 

Consider rabies vaccination before your trip if your activities mean you will be around dogs or wildlife.

Travelers more likely to encounter rabid animals include

  • Campers, adventure travelers, or cave explorers (spelunkers)
  • Veterinarians, animal handlers, field biologists, or laboratory workers handling animal specimens
  • Visitors to rural areas

Since children are more likely to be bitten or scratched by a dog or other animals, consider rabies vaccination for children traveling to Peru. 

Rabies - CDC Yellow Book

Recommended for most travelers, especially those staying with friends or relatives or visiting smaller cities or rural areas.

Typhoid - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Typhoid

Yellow Fever

Recommended for travelers ≥9 months old going to areas <2,300 m (≈7,550 ft) elevation in the regions of Amazonas, Cusco, Huánuco, Junín, Loreto, Madre de Dios, Pasco, Puno, San Martín, and Ucayali, and designated areas of Ancash (far northeast), Apurímac (far north), Ayacucho (north and northeast), Cajamarca (north and east), Huancavelica (far north), La Libertad (east), and Piura (east). Generally not recommended for travel limited to the following areas west of the Andes: the regions of Lambayeque and Tumbes, and designated areas of Cajamarca (west-central), and Piura (west). Not recommended for travel limited to areas >2,300 m (≈7,550 ft) elevation, areas west of the Andes not listed above, the city of Lima (the capital), and the highland tourist areas (the city of Cusco, the Inca Trail, and Machu Picchu).

Yellow Fever - CDC Yellow Book

Avoid contaminated water

Leptospirosis

How most people get sick (most common modes of transmission)

  • Touching urine or other body fluids from an animal infected with leptospirosis
  • Swimming or wading in urine-contaminated fresh water, or contact with urine-contaminated mud
  • Drinking water or eating food contaminated with animal urine
  • Avoid contaminated water and soil

Clinical Guidance

Avoid bug bites, chagas disease (american trypanosomiasis).

  • Accidentally rub feces (poop) of the triatomine bug into the bug bite, other breaks in the skin, your eyes, or mouth
  • From pregnant woman to her baby, contaminated blood products (transfusions), or contaminated food or drink.
  • Avoid Bug Bites

Chagas disease

  • Mosquito bite

Leishmaniasis

  • Sand fly bite
  • An infected pregnant woman can spread it to her unborn baby

Airborne & droplet

  • Breathing in air or accidentally eating food contaminated with the urine, droppings, or saliva of infected rodents
  • Bite from an infected rodent
  • Less commonly, being around someone sick with hantavirus (only occurs with Andes virus)
  • Avoid rodents and areas where they live
  • Avoid sick people

Tuberculosis (TB)

  • Breathe in TB bacteria that is in the air from an infected and contagious person coughing, speaking, or singing.

Learn actions you can take to stay healthy and safe on your trip. Vaccines cannot protect you from many diseases in Peru, so your behaviors are important.

Eat and drink safely

Food and water standards around the world vary based on the destination. Standards may also differ within a country and risk may change depending on activity type (e.g., hiking versus business trip). You can learn more about safe food and drink choices when traveling by accessing the resources below.

  • Choose Safe Food and Drinks When Traveling
  • Water Treatment Options When Hiking, Camping or Traveling
  • Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene | Healthy Water
  • Avoid Contaminated Water During Travel

You can also visit the Department of State Country Information Pages for additional information about food and water safety.

Prevent bug bites

Bugs (like mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas) can spread a number of diseases in Peru. Many of these diseases cannot be prevented with a vaccine or medicine. You can reduce your risk by taking steps to prevent bug bites.

What can I do to prevent bug bites?

  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
  • Use an appropriate insect repellent (see below).
  • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents). Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
  • Stay and sleep in air-conditioned or screened rooms.
  • Use a bed net if the area where you are sleeping is exposed to the outdoors.

What type of insect repellent should I use?

  • FOR PROTECTION AGAINST TICKS AND MOSQUITOES: Use a repellent that contains 20% or more DEET for protection that lasts up to several hours.
  • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin)
  • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or para-menthane-diol (PMD)
  • 2-undecanone
  • Always use insect repellent as directed.

What should I do if I am bitten by bugs?

  • Avoid scratching bug bites, and apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to reduce the itching.
  • Check your entire body for ticks after outdoor activity. Be sure to remove ticks properly.

What can I do to avoid bed bugs?

Although bed bugs do not carry disease, they are an annoyance. See our information page about avoiding bug bites for some easy tips to avoid them. For more information on bed bugs, see Bed Bugs .

For more detailed information on avoiding bug bites, see Avoid Bug Bites .

Some diseases in Peru—such as dengue, Zika, louse-borne typhus, and Chagas disease—are spread by bugs and cannot be prevented with a vaccine. Follow the insect avoidance measures described above to prevent these and other illnesses.

Stay safe outdoors

If your travel plans in Peru include outdoor activities, take these steps to stay safe and healthy during your trip.

  • Stay alert to changing weather conditions and adjust your plans if conditions become unsafe.
  • Prepare for activities by wearing the right clothes and packing protective items, such as bug spray, sunscreen, and a basic first aid kit.
  • Consider learning basic first aid and CPR before travel. Bring a travel health kit with items appropriate for your activities.
  • If you are outside for many hours in heat, eat salty snacks and drink water to stay hydrated and replace salt lost through sweating.
  • Protect yourself from UV radiation : use sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15, wear protective clothing, and seek shade during the hottest time of day (10 a.m.–4 p.m.).
  • Be especially careful during summer months and at high elevation. Because sunlight reflects off snow, sand, and water, sun exposure may be increased during activities like skiing, swimming, and sailing.
  • Very cold temperatures can be dangerous. Dress in layers and cover heads, hands, and feet properly if you are visiting a cold location.

Stay safe around water

  • Swim only in designated swimming areas. Obey lifeguards and warning flags on beaches.
  • Practice safe boating—follow all boating safety laws, do not drink alcohol if driving a boat, and always wear a life jacket.
  • Do not dive into shallow water.
  • Do not swim in freshwater in developing areas or where sanitation is poor.
  • Avoid swallowing water when swimming. Untreated water can carry germs that make you sick.
  • To prevent infections, wear shoes on beaches where there may be animal waste.

Many popular destinations in Peru, such as Machu Picchu, are at high altitudes. You may experience altitude sickness as a result. Talk to your doctor about ways to prevent and treat altitude sickness.

See Travel to High Altitudes .

Leptospirosis, a bacterial infection that can be spread in fresh water, is found in Peru. Avoid swimming in fresh, unchlorinated water, such as lakes, ponds, or rivers.

Keep away from animals

Most animals avoid people, but they may attack if they feel threatened, are protecting their young or territory, or if they are injured or ill. Animal bites and scratches can lead to serious diseases such as rabies.

Follow these tips to protect yourself:

  • Do not touch or feed any animals you do not know.
  • Do not allow animals to lick open wounds, and do not get animal saliva in your eyes or mouth.
  • Avoid rodents and their urine and feces.
  • Traveling pets should be supervised closely and not allowed to come in contact with local animals.
  • If you wake in a room with a bat, seek medical care immediately. Bat bites may be hard to see.

All animals can pose a threat, but be extra careful around dogs, bats, monkeys, sea animals such as jellyfish, and snakes. If you are bitten or scratched by an animal, immediately:

  • Wash the wound with soap and clean water.
  • Go to a doctor right away.
  • Tell your doctor about your injury when you get back to the United States.

Consider buying medical evacuation insurance. Rabies is a deadly disease that must be treated quickly, and treatment may not be available in some countries.

Reduce your exposure to germs

Follow these tips to avoid getting sick or spreading illness to others while traveling:

  • Wash your hands often, especially before eating.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, clean hands with hand sanitizer (containing at least 60% alcohol).
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Try to avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home or in your hotel room, unless you need medical care.

Avoid sharing body fluids

Diseases can be spread through body fluids, such as saliva, blood, vomit, and semen.

Protect yourself:

  • Use latex condoms correctly.
  • Do not inject drugs.
  • Limit alcohol consumption. People take more risks when intoxicated.
  • Do not share needles or any devices that can break the skin. That includes needles for tattoos, piercings, and acupuncture.
  • If you receive medical or dental care, make sure the equipment is disinfected or sanitized.

Know how to get medical care while traveling

Plan for how you will get health care during your trip, should the need arise:

  • Carry a list of local doctors and hospitals at your destination.
  • Review your health insurance plan to determine what medical services it would cover during your trip. Consider purchasing travel health and medical evacuation insurance.
  • Carry a card that identifies, in the local language, your blood type, chronic conditions or serious allergies, and the generic names of any medications you take.
  • Some prescription drugs may be illegal in other countries. Call Peru’s embassy to verify that all of your prescription(s) are legal to bring with you.
  • Bring all the medicines (including over-the-counter medicines) you think you might need during your trip, including extra in case of travel delays. Ask your doctor to help you get prescriptions filled early if you need to.

Many foreign hospitals and clinics are accredited by the Joint Commission International. A list of accredited facilities is available at their website ( www.jointcommissioninternational.org ).

In some countries, medicine (prescription and over-the-counter) may be substandard or counterfeit. Bring the medicines you will need from the United States to avoid having to buy them at your destination.

Malaria is a risk in some parts of Peru. If you are going to a risk area, fill your malaria prescription before you leave, and take enough with you for the entire length of your trip. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking the pills; some need to be started before you leave.

Select safe transportation

Motor vehicle crashes are the #1 killer of healthy US citizens in foreign countries.

In many places cars, buses, large trucks, rickshaws, bikes, people on foot, and even animals share the same lanes of traffic, increasing the risk for crashes.

Be smart when you are traveling on foot.

  • Use sidewalks and marked crosswalks.
  • Pay attention to the traffic around you, especially in crowded areas.
  • Remember, people on foot do not always have the right of way in other countries.

Riding/Driving

Choose a safe vehicle.

  • Choose official taxis or public transportation, such as trains and buses.
  • Ride only in cars that have seatbelts.
  • Avoid overcrowded, overloaded, top-heavy buses and minivans.
  • Avoid riding on motorcycles or motorbikes, especially motorbike taxis. (Many crashes are caused by inexperienced motorbike drivers.)
  • Choose newer vehicles—they may have more safety features, such as airbags, and be more reliable.
  • Choose larger vehicles, which may provide more protection in crashes.

Think about the driver.

  • Do not drive after drinking alcohol or ride with someone who has been drinking.
  • Consider hiring a licensed, trained driver familiar with the area.
  • Arrange payment before departing.

Follow basic safety tips.

  • Wear a seatbelt at all times.
  • Sit in the back seat of cars and taxis.
  • When on motorbikes or bicycles, always wear a helmet. (Bring a helmet from home, if needed.)
  • Avoid driving at night; street lighting in certain parts of Peru may be poor.
  • Do not use a cell phone or text while driving (illegal in many countries).
  • Travel during daylight hours only, especially in rural areas.
  • If you choose to drive a vehicle in Peru, learn the local traffic laws and have the proper paperwork.
  • Get any driving permits and insurance you may need. Get an International Driving Permit (IDP). Carry the IDP and a US-issued driver's license at all times.
  • Check with your auto insurance policy's international coverage, and get more coverage if needed. Make sure you have liability insurance.
  • Avoid using local, unscheduled aircraft.
  • If possible, fly on larger planes (more than 30 seats); larger airplanes are more likely to have regular safety inspections.
  • Try to schedule flights during daylight hours and in good weather.

Medical Evacuation Insurance

If you are seriously injured, emergency care may not be available or may not meet US standards. Trauma care centers are uncommon outside urban areas. Having medical evacuation insurance can be helpful for these reasons.

Helpful Resources

Road Safety Overseas (Information from the US Department of State): Includes tips on driving in other countries, International Driving Permits, auto insurance, and other resources.

The Association for International Road Travel has country-specific Road Travel Reports available for most countries for a minimal fee.

For information traffic safety and road conditions in Peru, see Travel and Transportation on US Department of State's country-specific information for Peru .

Maintain personal security

Use the same common sense traveling overseas that you would at home, and always stay alert and aware of your surroundings.

Before you leave

  • Research your destination(s), including local laws, customs, and culture.
  • Monitor travel advisories and alerts and read travel tips from the US Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) .
  • Leave a copy of your itinerary, contact information, credit cards, and passport with someone at home.
  • Pack as light as possible, and leave at home any item you could not replace.

While at your destination(s)

  • Carry contact information for the nearest US embassy or consulate .
  • Carry a photocopy of your passport and entry stamp; leave the actual passport securely in your hotel.
  • Follow all local laws and social customs.
  • Do not wear expensive clothing or jewelry.
  • Always keep hotel doors locked, and store valuables in secure areas.
  • If possible, choose hotel rooms between the 2nd and 6th floors.

To call for emergency services while in Peru, dial 116 for the fire department and 105 for the police. Write these numbers down to carry with you during your trip.

Learn as much as you can about Peru before you travel there. A good place to start is the country-specific information on Peru from the US Department of State.

Healthy Travel Packing List

Use the Healthy Travel Packing List for Peru for a list of health-related items to consider packing for your trip. Talk to your doctor about which items are most important for you.

Why does CDC recommend packing these health-related items?

It’s best to be prepared to prevent and treat common illnesses and injuries. Some supplies and medicines may be difficult to find at your destination, may have different names, or may have different ingredients than what you normally use.

If you are not feeling well after your trip, you may need to see a doctor. If you need help finding a travel medicine specialist, see Find a Clinic . Be sure to tell your doctor about your travel, including where you went and what you did on your trip. Also tell your doctor if you were bitten or scratched by an animal while traveling.

If your doctor prescribed antimalarial medicine for your trip, keep taking the rest of your pills after you return home. If you stop taking your medicine too soon, you could still get sick.

Malaria is always a serious disease and may be a deadly illness. If you become ill with a fever either while traveling in a malaria-risk area or after you return home (for up to 1 year), you should seek immediate medical attention and should tell the doctor about your travel history.

For more information on what to do if you are sick after your trip, see Getting Sick after Travel .

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The Charlotte Observer

The United States issues new travel warning for Peru

T his week, the U.S. State Department issued an updated travel advisory for Peru . The travel warning reiterated its Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution advisory , focusing on providing updated information regarding crime in the country.

The Colombian-Peruvian border region in Loreto and the Puno Region, which includes the Peruvian side of Lake Titicaca, and the Apurimac Region, are advised against by the State Department owing to crime and unrest, respectively.

Additionally, due to crime and terrorism, the warning advises visitors to stay away from the Valley of the Apurimac, Ene, and Mantaro Rivers (VRAEM), which includes regions in the Departments of Ayacucho, Cusco, Huancavelica, and Junin.

Crime is a prevalent issue in Peru that encompasses a range of offenses, points out Travel Market Report , from minor theft to severe incidents such as “carjackings, muggings, and assaults.” Even with numerous witnesses, these violent crimes can occur during daylight hours. Although rare, kidnapping incidents do occur. According to the updated travel advisory, the crime risk escalates during nighttime. The State Department does, however, only warn passengers to proceed with greater caution; it doesn’t advise against traveling to Peru.

Various foreign locations that are popular travel destinations for Americans fall within the Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution or Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions category of the State Department. This covers the Bahamas (Level 2), France (Level 2), Italy (Level 2), Germany (Level 2), Spain (Level 2), Japan (Level 1), and Turks & Caicos (Level 2). Level 3 nations include Egypt, Hong Kong, China, Colombia, and Jamaica.

Detour previously reported on the travel warning for Jamaica, which was issued a Level 3: Reconsider Travel caution in May due to rising crime rates.

“Violent crimes, such as home invasions, armed robberies, sexual assaults, and homicides, are common. Sexual assaults occur frequently, including at all-inclusive resorts,” the new Level 3: Reconsider Travel advisory now warns.

The State Department updated its warning for several reasons, according to the advisory, including the fact that local police “often do not respond effectively to serious criminal incidents” and that “emergency services and hospital care vary throughout the island, and response times and quality of care may vary from U.S. standards.”

Evie Blanco is a journalist with nearly a decade of experience born in the Dominican Republic and raised in Queens, New York. She is extremely well-versed in hip-hop music and culture and is always aware of its developments. Whether it’s the latest in pop culture, a fascinating foreign destination, a truly amazing new restaurant, or breaking news, she loves to write about it all. Evie can be reached at [email protected] .

©2023 The Charlotte Observer. Visit charlotteobserver.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Charlotte

  • u.s. & world

Peru protests: Hundreds of tourists stranded after government declares states of emergency

About 300 tourists from around the world have been left stranded in the ancient city of Machu Picchu, according to the mayor, after Peru was plunged into a state of emergency following the ousting of the country's president.

Former President Pedro Castillo was impeached and subsequently arrested in early December after announcing his plan to dissolve Congress. The unrest sparked by his arrest has prompted international warnings about travel to Peru.

Darwin Baca, Machu Picchu's mayor, said that Peruvians, South Americans, Americans and Europeans are among the stranded travelers.

"We have asked the government to help us and establish helicopter flights in order to evacuate the tourists," Baca said Friday. The only way to get in and out of the town is by train, and these services are suspended until further notice, he said.

In a ray of hope for those affected, a statement published late Friday by the Municipal District of Machu Picchu said stranded tourists were expected to be evacuated Saturday.

"The municipality, through the Tourism Unit, carries out the necessary coordination for the selection and prioritization of children and vulnerable people for the transfer on humanitarian flights, work that has been carried out in coordination with the National Police and the district Health Center," the statement said.

Trains to and from Machu Picchu, the primary means of accessing UNESCO World Heritage Site, were halted on Tuesday, according to a statement from PeruRail, Peru's railway operator in the south and southeast regions of the country.

"PeruRail said they are still reviewing the situation," Baca explained.

The United States is in touch with American citizens stranded in Peru, a State Department Spokesperson told CNN on Friday.

"We are providing all appropriate consular assistance, and are monitoring the situation closely. Due to privacy and security considerations, we won't go into further details about numbers of US citizens who have reached out," the spokesperson added.

The US embassy in Peru said in a statement early on Friday that the Peruvian government was organizing an evacuation of foreigners from Aguas Calientes, a town that serves as the main access point to Machu Picchu.

"We will release a message with instructions as soon as the assistance plan is confirmed. Travelers located at Aguas Calientes/Machu Picchu Village should follow instructions from local authorities whether they choose to remain in place for assistance with travel to Cusco, as well as any travelers who may choose to travel by foot," the statement added.

Food shortages in Machu Picchu

Meanwhile, Mayor Baca warned that Machu Picchu is already suffering from food shortages because of the protests, and the local economy relies 100% on tourism.

Baca called on the government, led by new President Dina Boluarte, to establish a dialogue with the local population to put an end to the social unrest as soon as possible.

PeruRail said it would assist affected passengers in changing the dates of their travel.

"We regret the inconvenience that these announcements generate for our passengers; however, they are due to situations beyond the control of our company and seek to prioritize the safety of passengers and workers," the company said in a statement.

Peru's Ministry of Transport said Friday that flights had resumed from the Alejandro Velasco Astete International Airport in Cusco after they were temporarily suspended amid protests in the country.

"Passengers who need to move during curfew hours may use their travel tickets as a safe-conduct," the ministry said.

Operations to and from Alfredo Rodríguez Ballón International Airport in Arequipa remain suspended.

"LATAM maintains constant monitoring of the political situation in Peru to provide the pertinent information according to how it may impact our air operation," LATAM Airlines Peru said in statement.

"We await the response of the relevant authorities, who must take corrective measures to ensure safety for the development of air operations."

It added: "We regret the inconvenience that this situation beyond our control has caused our passengers and we reinforce our commitment to air safety and connectivity in the country."

At least 20 people have died amid the political demonstrations.

Warnings from the US, the UK and Canada

The US State Department has issued a travel advisory for citizens traveling in Peru, which it has listed as a level three "reconsider travel" destination.

"Demonstrations can cause the shutdown of local roads, trains, and major highways, often without prior notice or estimated reopening timelines.

"Road closures may significantly reduce access to public transportation and airports and may disrupt travel both within and between cities," it warns.

The State Department is asking travelers in Peru to sign up for STEP alerts from the US Embassy if they haven't yet.

The United Kingdom's Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office has also warned its citizens about the situation.

"British nationals should take particular care to avoid all areas of protests. If possible, you should remain in a safe place. ... You should plan ahead for severe disruption to any plans," the FCDO said Friday evening on its website.

It also told travelers arriving in the capital, Lima, that there was no ability to travel to or from many regional areas -- including Cusco and Arequipa -- and that more disruptions were possible.

British nationals were also warned to respect Peruvian curfews put in place and to monitor local news and social media for more information.

Canada's Global Affairs department has warned its citizens to "exercise a high degree of caution" in Peru and to avoid nonessential travel in numerous regions. Canada's Global News spoke to one Canadian stuck in the small town of Ica in southern Peru, who said he's now away from civil unrest but was robbed in a taxi.

Amy Madden, a US traveler in Peru, recounted a lengthy trek she and other stranded tourists made through the country's Sacred Valley in an attempt to leave the area following days of unrest.

The journey included a scare when her tour group had to stop at an improvised road block in a village near Ollantaytambo on Friday, she told CNN via text message.

Once the tourists had exited the van, a group of a dozen men and some women attacked the empty vehicle, she said, with one man using a scythe to slash the tires. She and the other tourists ran away and were not harmed, she added. Another van later picked them up and took them to Ollantaytambo.

Madden said she had now made it safely to Cusco and was looking -- without much luck -- for flights out of the country.

While she feels safe at the moment, she's antsy. "It's just a lot of unknowns," she said.

Tourists running out of medications

Another American tourist who's stuck in Machu Picchu has run out of medication and is unsure when she'll be able to leave the small town and get more, she told CNN.

Florida resident Kathryn Martucci, 71, was on a group trip with 13 other Americans when Peru went into the state of emergency, she said.

According to Martucci, her travel group was unable to grab the last train out of the small town before the railroad was suspended.

Her son Michael Martucci, who lives in the United States, also spoke with CNN and has been trying to help his mother find a way out.

"They've been there since Monday, and now she and the other people she's with are running out of the medications they need," Michael Martucci said. "There's nothing in the tiny town they're stuck in. They're safe and have food thankfully, but there's no way to get more medication."

Kathryn Martucci said her group was scheduled to stay in Machu Picchu for two days, so they were told to pack light and only bring a two-day supply of medication.

On Friday morning, Martucci said her tour guide took her group to city hall to be medically evaluated in hopes that local officials would understand their situation and help them find a way out.

"There were about 100 tourists in line, and we waited for two hours before we saw the doctor," Martucci said. "They told me I was a priority, and that they were going to try to get me on a helicopter out of Machu Picchu in the next two days."

Yet, Martucci is unsure whether that will happen, she told CNN.

"There are several people in need of help, and a helicopter can only carry 10 people. We don't know what's going on."

(The-CNN-Wire & 2022 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.)

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Places the U.S. Government Warns Not to Travel Right Now

You may want to reconsider traveling to these countries right now.

Do Not Travel to These Countries

Man walking through an airport with his suitcase

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Crime, civil unrest and terrorism are common risk factors for countries that end up on the State Department's "Do Not Travel" advisory list.

Global conflicts and climate crises , ranging from a series of coups across Africa to earthquakes and floods in catastrophe-prone countries, affected international travel patterns throughout 2023.

Still, international tourist arrivals reached 91% of pre-pandemic levels in the third quarter of 2023, according to estimates by the World Tourism Organization based on travel patterns through September. In December alone, about 6 million U.S. citizens left the country for international destinations, 16% higher than the same month in 2019, according to the International Trade Administration . But some destinations warrant more caution than others.

On Oct. 19, following the outbreak of war between Israel and Gaza and flaring tensions in the region, the U.S. State Department issued a worldwide caution advisory due to “increased tensions in various locations around the world, the potential for terrorist attacks, demonstrations or violent actions against U.S. citizens and interests.” Prior to this update, the most recent worldwide caution advisory was issued in 2022 after a U.S. strike killed Ayman al-Zawahiri, Osama bin Laden’s successor as leader of Al Qaeda, causing “a higher potential for anti-American violence.” The worldwide caution advisory remains in effect.

The U.S. State Department also issues individual travel advisory levels for more than 200 countries globally, continually updating them based on a variety of risk indicators such as health, terrorism and civil unrest. Travel advisory levels range from Level 1, which means exercise normal precautions, to Level 4, which means do not travel there.

About 10% of countries – 19 total – have a Level 4: “Do Not Travel” advisory as of Jan. 29. In Level 4 countries, the U.S. government may have “very limited ability” to step in should travelers’ safety or security be at risk, according to the State Department. Crime, civil unrest, kidnapping and terrorism are common risk factors associated with Level 4 countries.

So far in 2024, the State Department made changes to the existing Level 4 advisories for Myanmar, Iran and Gaza, and moved Niger and Lebanon off of the Level 4 list.

Places With a Level 4 Travel Advisory

These are the primary areas the U.S. government says not to travel to right now, in alphabetical order:

Jump to Place: Afghanistan Belarus Burkina Faso Central African Republic Myanmar (formerly Burma) Gaza Haiti Iran Iraq Libya Mali Mexico North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) Russia Somalia South Sudan Sudan Syria Ukraine Venezuela Yemen

Afghanistan: The Central Asian country is wrestling with “terrorism, risk of wrongful detention, kidnapping and crime,” according to the State Department. U.S. citizens are specifically at risk for wrongful detention and kidnapping. In 2022, the government reinstituted public floggings and executions, and women’s rights are disappearing under Taliban control. The U.S. Embassy in Kabul halted operations in August 2021. Since the Taliban took control , many forms of international aid have been halted . Meanwhile, in October 2023, some of the year’s deadliest earthquakes killed more than 2,400 in Afghanistan while the country continues to face a years-long extreme drought.

Belarus: Belarus, which shares a western border with Russia and a southern border with Ukraine, has been flagged for “Belarusian authorities’ continued facilitation of Russia’s war against Ukraine, the buildup of Russian military forces in Belarus, the arbitrary enforcement of local laws, the potential of civil unrest, the risk of detention, and the Embassy’s limited ability to assist U.S. citizens residing in or traveling to Belarus.” The U.S. Embassy in Minsk halted operations in February 2022.

Burkina Faso: Terrorism, crime and kidnapping are plaguing this West African nation. Terrorist attacks may target hotels, restaurants and schools with little to no warning, and the East and Sahel regions of the country are under a state of emergency. In late November hundreds died in clashes between state security forces and rebels near the country’s border with Mali. More than 2 million people in Burkina Faso are displaced due to “violence linked to al-Qaida and the Islamic State group.”

Central African Republic: While there have not been specific incidents of U.S. citizens targeted with violence or crime, violent crime and sudden closure of roads and borders is common. The advisory states that “Embassy Bangui’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens, crime, civil unrest, and kidnapping” is a factor in its assessment. Recent data from UNICEF suggests the country has the worst drinking water accessibility of all countries in 2022.

Myanmar (Formerly Burma): Armed conflict and civil unrest are the primary reasons to not travel to this Southeast Asian country, which experienced a military coup in early 2021. Limited health care resources, wrongful detentions and “areas with land mines and unexploded ordnance” are also listed as risk factors. After Ukraine and Israel, Myanmar had the highest conflict-related death toll in 2023.

Gaza : Hamas, a foreign terrorist organization as designated by the State Department, controls much of the Gaza Strip, which shares borders with both Israel and Egypt. On Oct. 7, 2023, Hamas fighters broke across the border into Israel, killing hundreds of civilians and soldiers in a brazen attack that stunned Israelis. On Oct. 10, Israel hit the Gaza Strip with “the fiercest air strikes in its 75-year conflict” according to Reuters . The conflict has since escalated into war between Israel and Hamas, with regular Israeli airstrikes leading to extensive civilian casualties in Gaza. As of mid-December, nearly 85% of Gaza’s population were displaced from their homes, according to UN estimates . The region continues to face shortages of food , water, electricity and medical supplies , with conditions deemed “far beyond a humanitarian crisis.” The State Department warns of terrorism and armed conflict within Gaza’s borders.

Haiti: In July 2023, the Department of State ordered all non-emergency U.S. government personnel and family members to leave the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince in response to the increased risk of kidnapping and violent crime in the country , as well as armed conflict between gangs and police. The travel advisory states that cases of kidnapping “often involve ransom negotiations and U.S. citizen victims have been physically harmed during kidnappings.” The travel advisory also states that “U.S. citizens in Haiti should depart Haiti as soon as possible” given “the current security situation and infrastructure challenges.” A series of gang attacks in late September 2023 caused thousands to flee their homes, and many aid groups have been forced to cut or suspend operations amid escalating violence in recent months.

Iran: Terrorism, kidnapping and civil unrest are risk factors for all travelers to Iran, while U.S. citizens are specifically at risk for “arbitrary arrest.” U.S.-Iranian nationals such as students, journalists and business travelers have been arrested on charges of espionage and threatening national security. Executions in Iran rose sharply between 2021 and 2022, bringing the country’s total to nearly 580 people over the year, according to a report by Amnesty International released in May 2023.

Iraq: The State Department cites “terrorism, kidnapping, armed conflict [and] civil unrest” as cause for the country’s Level 4 distinction. Iraq’s northern borders, and its border with Syria, are especially dangerous. Since the escalation of conflict in neighboring Israel in October, there has been an increase in attacks against Iraqi military bases, which host U.S. troops and other international forces. On Oct. 20, non-emergency U.S. government personnel and eligible family members were ordered to leave the U.S. embassy in Baghdad.

Libya: Following the end of its dictatorship over a decade ago, Libya has been wrought with internal conflict between armed groups in the East and West. Armed conflict, civil unrest, crime, kidnapping and terrorism are all risk factors. U.S. citizens have been targets of kidnapping for ransom, with terrorists targeting hotels and airports frequented by Westerners. The U.S. Embassy in Tripoli halted operations in 2014. In mid-September 2023, floods, which some say were intensified by climate change , killed thousands in eastern Libya. Clashes between armed factions escalated across the country in the latter half of 2023, including in the capital city of Tripoli and in Benghazi.

Mali: After experiencing military coups in 2020 and 2021, crime, terrorism and kidnapping are all prevalent threats in this West African landlocked nation. In July 2022, non-emergency U.S. government employees and their families were ordered to leave the country due to higher risk of terrorist activity. A U.N. report in August 2023 said that military groups in the country, including both Mali security forces and possibly Russian Wagner mercenaries, were spreading terror through the use of violence against women and human rights abuses. Democratic elections were supposed to occur in February 2024, but Mali’s military junta postponed the plans indefinitely. In December, the U.N. officially ended a decade-long peacekeeping presence in the country, which had been among the agency’s deadliest missions, with hundreds of the mission personnel killed since 2013.

Mexico: Each state in Mexico is assessed separately for travel advisory levels. Six of the 32 states in Mexico are designated as Level 4: Colima, Guerrero, Michoacan, Sinaloa, Tamaulipas and Zacatecas. Crime and kidnapping are listed as the primary risk factors throughout the country. Nearly 112,000 people were missing across the country as of October, a number the U.N. has called “alarming.”

North Korea (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea): U.S. passports are not valid for travel “to, in, or through” this country, home to one of the world's longest-running dynastic dictatorships. The travel advisory states that the Level 4 distinction is due to “the continuing serious risk of arrest and long-term detention of U.S. nationals.” In July 2023, a U.S. soldier fled across the border into North Korea, where he is believed to be in North Korean custody, the first American detained in the North in nearly five years. He was returned to U.S. custody in September 2023.

Russia: The travel advisory for Russia cites its invasion of Ukraine , harassment of U.S. citizens by Russian government officials and arbitrary law enforcement as a few of the reasons for the Level 4 designation. Chechnya and Mount Elbrus are specifically listed as Level 4 regions. Terrorism, civil unrest, health, kidnapping and wrongful detention are all noted as risks.

Russia Invades Ukraine: A Timeline

TOPSHOT - Black smoke rises from a military airport in Chuguyev near Kharkiv  on February 24, 2022. - Russian President Vladimir Putin announced a military operation in Ukraine today with explosions heard soon after across the country and its foreign minister warning a "full-scale invasion" was underway. (Photo by Aris Messinis / AFP) (Photo by ARIS MESSINIS/AFP via Getty Images)

Somalia: A severe drought resulting from five failed rainy seasons in a row killed 43,000 people in 2022, and caused a famine amid conflict with Islamist insurgents . Violent crime is common throughout Somalia , pirates frequent its coast off the Horn of Africa, and medical facilities, where they exist, have limited capacity. Crime, terrorism, civil unrest, health and kidnapping are all risk factors. In January 2024, some passengers aboard a U.N.-contracted helicopter were taken hostage by al-Shabaab militants after the vehicle crashed in central Somalia.

South Sudan: Crime, kidnapping and armed conflict are the primary risk factors for South Sudan, which separated from Sudan in 2011, making it the world’s newest country . Weapons are readily available, and travelers have been victims of sexual assault and armed robbery.

Sudan: The U.S. evacuated its embassy in Khartoum in April 2023, and the country closed its airspace due to the ongoing conflict in the country, only permitting humanitarian aid and evacuation efforts. Fighting has escalated in the region between two warring generals seeking to gain control after a military coup in 2021 ousted the country’s prime minister. Civil unrest is the primary risk factor for Africa’s third largest country by area. Crime, terrorism, kidnapping and armed conflict are also noted. The International Criminal Court began investigating alleged war crimes and violence against African ethnic groups in the country in 2023. Millions have fled their homes due to conflict, and the U.N. has said its efforts to provide aid have been hindered by a lack of support, safety and resources. As recently as December 2023, the United Nations warned of catastrophic famine , with millions of children at-risk for malnutrition .

Syria: The advisory states that “No part of Syria is safe from violence,” with terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping, armed conflict and risk of unjust detention all potential risk factors. U.S. citizens are often a target for kidnappings and detention. The U.S. Embassy in Damascus halted operations in 2012. Fighting in neighboring Israel has escalated since October, and the conflict has spilled over into Syria, where the U.S. has carried out air strikes following drone and rocket attacks against American troops in Syria and Iraq, triggered by the Israel-Hamas war.

Ukraine: Russian setbacks in their invasion of Ukraine buoyed hopes in Ukraine in 2023. However, Ukraine is a Level 4 country due to Russia’s invasion, with crime and civil unrest also noted as risk factors. The country’s forces shot down two Russian fighter jets on Christmas Eve 2023, in a move Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said “sets the right mood for the entire year ahead.”

Venezuela: Human rights abuses and lack of health care plague this South American nation, which has been in a political crisis since 2014. In 2019, diplomatic personnel were withdrawn from the U.S. Embassy in Caracas. Threats in the country include crime, civil unrest, kidnapping, wrongful detention and poor health infrastructure.

Yemen: Six of the nine risk factors defined by the State Department – terrorism, civil unrest, health risks, kidnapping, armed conflict and landmines – are all present in Yemen. Despite private companies offering tourist visits to the Yemeni island of Socotra, the U.S. government argues those arranging such visits “are putting tourists in danger.” Civil war and cholera are also both present throughout the country. The U.S. Embassy in Sanaa halted operations in 2015. The country has experienced a relative lull in the civil war fighting, but as peace negotiations have gotten traction, flare ups in the fighting have jeopardized progress. Most recently, the U.S. and U.K. have carried out a series of airstrikes in the country, targeting Iran-backed Houthi sites.

Other Countries to Watch

Since Jan. 1, the State Department has updated travel advisories for 14 different countries as well as for the West Bank and Gaza, adding information about specific regions or risk factors, or simply renewing an existing advisory. Travel advisory levels can change based on several factors in a nation, such as increased civil unrest, policies that affect human rights or higher risks of unlawful detention.

The State Department has given about 25 countries an assessment of Level 3, meaning it recommends people “reconsider travel” to those destinations.

On Oct. 14, one week after the deadly Hamas attack on Israel, Israel and the West Bank were both moved from Level 2 to Level 3, while Gaza remains at Level 4. The region’s travel advisory was updated again in November to reflect travel restrictions for certain government employees who have not already left the area, and it was updated again on Jan. 3.

Following the outbreak of the Israel-Hamas war in early October, the U.S. State Department raised Lebanon ’s travel advisory level from a Level 3 to a Level 4 level due to “the unpredictable security situation related to rocket, missile, and artillery exchanges” between Israel and Hezbollah or other militant groups. In December, the U.S. Embassy in Beirut returned to normal staffing and presence, and on Jan. 29, the country was moved back to Level 3. Crime, terrorism, armed conflict, civil unrest, kidnapping and unexploded landmines are listed as the country’s primary risk factors. However, the country’s borders with Syria and with Israel, as well as refugee settlements within Lebanon, are specifically noted as Level 4 regions.

China became a Level 3 country in late 2020, with an update in December 2022 citing “the surge in COVID-19 cases, arbitrary enforcement of local laws, and COVID-19-related restrictions” as the reason for the advisory. In June 2023, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) was moved from the Level 3 to the Level 2 list, but travelers are still advised to be cautious in the area due to “arbitrary enforcement of local laws.” Meanwhile, Macau remains at Level 3.

Following an attempted coup in August 2023, Niger was elevated to Level 4 in August and the Department of State ordered all non-emergency U.S. government personnel and family members to leave the U.S. Embassy in Niamey. In early January 2024, the overall risk level for the country was lowered back to Level 3. Despite the new classification, the State Department still asks non-emergency government personnel and eligible family members to depart the country.

In mid-December 2023 there was an explosion at Guinea’s main fuel depot which has since affected access to health care and basic goods and services. The country was subsequently designated a Level 3 nation after having previously been Level 2. Concerns about civil unrest, health, crime and fuel shortages impacting local infrastructure were listed as the primary risk factors contributing to the change.

Several Level 3 countries are among the worst countries for human trafficking, as designated by the State Department’s annual Trafficking in Persons Report . Level 3 countries on this list include Papua New Guinea, Guinea Bissau, China and Chad. There are also nine Level 4 countries designated as among the worst for human trafficking: Afghanistan, Belarus, Iran, Myanmar, North Korea, Russia, Syria, South Sudan and Venezuela.

Over 70 countries are currently at Level 2, meaning the State Department recommends travelers “exercise increased caution” when traveling to those destinations.

Sweden is designated a Level 2 country, with terrorism noted as the primary risk factor in the country. France, which saw nationwide protests throughout 2023, has civil unrest and terrorism noted as risk factors for its Level 2 status.

The Level 2 travel advisory for the Bahamas was updated in January to reflect water safety concerns. The advisory warns that “activities involving commercial recreational watercraft, including water tours, are not consistently regulated” and notes that government personnel are “not permitted to use independently operated jet-ski rentals on New Providence and Paradise Islands.” It also warns visitors to be mindful of sharks, weather and water conditions. The advisory also says that crime is a primary risk factor with gang-on-gang violence contributing to high homicide rates in some areas. Visitors are asked to “be vigilant” and to not physically resist robbery attempts.

Bangladesh 's Level 2 travel advisory was updated in October 2023 to add a note about the country’s upcoming general election Jan. 7, 2024. The advisory states “demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate into violence.”

In November, several Level 2 travel advisories were updated with new cautionary information. The advisory for Ghana was updated in November 2023 to reflect threats against LGBTQI+ travelers specifically, noting “anti-LGBTQI+ rhetoric and violence have increased in recent years.” Meanwhile, the advisory for South Africa now notes that routes recommended by GPS may be unsafe with higher risk for crime.

Turkmenistan was moved off of the Level 2 list to become the newest addition to the Level 1 list on Jan. 22, meaning normal precautions are recommended but there are no risk factors causing travelers to practice increased caution.

The State Department asks travelers to pay attention to travel advisory levels and alerts , review country information pages for their destinations and read related country security reports before going abroad.

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Travel Advisory Updates

Office of the Spokesperson

April 19, 2021

State Department Travel Advisory Updates

In order to provide U.S. travelers detailed and actionable information to make informed travel decisions, the Department of State regularly assesses and updates our Travel Advisories, based primarily on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Travel Health Notices (THNs) and secondary factors such as commercial flight availability, restrictions on U.S. citizen entry, and impediments to obtaining COVID test results within three calendar days.

The following Travel Advisories have been updated to reflect the current CDC THNs for COVID-19.

We continue to monitor health and safety conditions around the world, working with the CDC and other agencies, as conditions evolve.

This week, the following Travel Advisories have been assessed and reissued with updates, raised to a Level 4 – Do Not Travel:

This week, the following Travel Advisory has been assessed and reissued with updates, lowered to a Level 3 – Reconsider Travel.

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COVID-19: travel health notice for all travellers

Peru travel advice

Latest updates: Editorial change

Last updated: January 30, 2024 17:00 ET

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Safety and security, entry and exit requirements, laws and culture, natural disasters and climate, peru - exercise a high degree of caution.

Exercise a high degree of caution in Peru due to high levels of crime, as well as social conflicts and strikes that may occur across the country.

Regional advisory - Avoid non-essential travel

  • Huallaga and Tocache provinces in the department of San Martín
  • the Upper Huallaga and Ene river valleys in the departments of Huánuco and San Martín
  • Padre Abad province in the department of Ucayali
  • Huacaybamba, Humalíes, Leoncio Prado and Marañón provinces in the department of Huánuco
  • Concepción and Satipo provinces in the department of Junín
  • Tayacaja province in the department of Huancavelica
  • the districts of Abancay, Andahuaylas and Chincheros in the department of Apurímac
  • Huanta and La Mar provinces, in the department of Ayacucho
  • Valley of Apurimac, Ene and Mantaro rivers (VRAEM)

Border area with Colombia - Avoid non-essential travel

Avoid non-essential travel to areas within 20 km of the border with Colombia due to drug trafficking and occasional incursions by armed guerrilla forces from Colombia into Peru.

Border area with Ecuador - Avoid non-essential travel

Avoid non-essential travel to areas within 20 km of the border with Ecuador, especially in the Cordillera del Cóndor region, due to the safety threat posed by landmines.

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State of emergency in regions bordering Ecuador

On January 10, 2024, the Peruvian government declared a state of emergency in the northern regions bordering Ecuador following the Government of Ecuador’s declaration of a nationwide state of “internal armed conflict” on January 9, 2024. The state of emergency is in effect in the following regions:

If you are in these regions, you should carry identification with you at all times.

Demonstrations and strikes

Demonstrations and strikes take place regularly throughout the country. Strikes can complicate travel and disrupt public transport and services, including your ability to travel to or leave isolated tourist destinations such as Machu Picchu. They could also lead to border closures with Bolivia. Protestors may also block rivers essential for transportation in some remote regions, including the Manu region of Madre de Dios and Iquitos region. This may result in the temporary detainment of tourists.

Even peaceful demonstrations can turn violent at any time. Police have used tear gas and other methods to disperse crowds in the past. Authorities often declare a state of emergency in response to demonstrations. 

Peruvian law prohibits political activities by foreigners. You may face detention or deportation if you take part in a demonstration.

  • Avoid areas where demonstrations and large gatherings are taking place
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities
  • Consult local media to be aware of strikes and demonstrations that may affect your stay or travel plans

Mass gatherings (large-scale events)

State of Emergency 

The Peruvian government periodically declares a state of emergency in certain areas to allow the military to assist police forces to respond to security incidents and natural disasters. When a state of emergency is in effect, security forces have increased rights to:

  • restrict freedom of movement
  • monitor correspondence
  • conduct search and seizures
  • detain persons of interest

Border area with Colombia

Criminal activity related to narcotics trafficking and occasional incursions by armed guerrilla forces from Colombia at Cordillera del Cóndor, Peru, pose a threat to personal security.

Border area with Ecuador

Cross the Peru–Ecuador border at official crossing points only due to the presence of landmines along the border.

Basic services in the Tumbes district have become increasingly difficult to access due to an increased number of migrants entering Peru from the North land border with Ecuador. The increased population has limited the provision of these services.

Valle de los Ríos Apurímac, Ene y Mantaro (VRAEM)

Drug trafficking.

Cocaine production and trafficking occurs inVRAEM. Travel is particularly dangerous in areas where there is coca cultivation and processing.

Domestic terrorism

Incidents of domestic terrorism have occurred in VRAEM, particularly the region where the Apurímac, Ayacucho, Cuzco and Junín departments meet.

Crime rates are high throughout the country.

  • Maintain a high level of vigilance and personal security awareness, especially at night
  • Avoid walking in deserted or under-populated areas
  • Travel in groups whenever possible

Petty crime

Petty crime, such as pickpocketing and purse snatching, occurs, particularly in Lima, in other cities and even in crowded, public areas. Theft occurs frequently in hotels, restaurants, bus stations and airports, on intercity buses and microbuses and while hailing taxis.

  • Avoid wearing expensive watches and jewellery, or showing signs of affluence
  • Ensure that your belongings, including your passport and other travel documents, are secure at all times
  • Never leave bags unattended

Pickpockets and bag snatchers may work in pairs or groups and employ a variety of ruses to divert their victim’s attention. A common scam involves spraying a substance on victims and then robbing them while pretending to help clean the stain, or distracting the victim by asking questions while another person perpetrates the theft. In some cases, thieves on motorcycles will snatch purses, backpacks or cellular phones. 

Violent crime

Violent crime occurs. Incidents have included:

  • kidnappings

Armed robbery

Armed robberies are on the rise. While most victims are not physically injured, criminals will not hesitate to use force when opposed.

  • If you are robbed, hand over your cash, electronic devices and valuables without resistance
  • Be particularly vigilant after visiting a bank, an ATM or a change bureau, as thieves may follow and rob victims.
  • Use ATMs inside banks and during regular hours of service, when guards are on duty

Assaults have occurred along the Inca Trail and in the Huaraz region of the Cordillera Blanca mountains. Hiking in these regions should be done in groups.

Express kidnappings involving tourists have occurred. Victims are usually abducted for a few hours and forced to withdraw money from ATMs for their release. Most express kidnappings take place at night, but incidents also occur during daylight hours. Incidents often involve criminals posing as taxi drivers, or taxi drivers working for organized gangs. Virtual kidnappings occur throughout the country. Criminals use stolen cellphones to contact family members claiming to have kidnapped the owner of the phone and then ask for ransom money.

  • Be suspicious of strangers approaching you on the street
  • Never leave your cellphone unattended
  • Be cautious when using cellphones and smart devices in public as they are often targeted by thieves, especially while people are using them
  • Ensure your phone is password protected

Organized crime

Organized crime is reportedly increasing in parts of Lima Province and in some districts of the Department of Piura. In some parts of the country, military and security forces have been deployed to assist police in combatting organized crime.

Incidents of domestic terrorism occur, particularly in remote jungle areas such as:

  • parts of the Huancavelica and Ucayali departments
  •  the Upper Huallaga river valley in the Huánuco and San Martín departments.

Incidents have included:

  • temporary ambushes of small villages
  • bombings or threats of violence against local security forces or community figures

Overland travel in these regions is unsafe.

Counterfeit currency

Counterfeit currency in both sol and U.S. dollars is a growing and serious problem. Counterfeit bills are widely distributed, including by banks, casinos and local stores.

Avoid moneychangers on the street, as they may carry counterfeit currency or work with pickpockets.

Credit card fraud

Credit card and ATM fraud occurs. Be cautious when using debit or credit cards:

  • pay careful attention when your cards are being handled by others
  • use ATMs located in well-lit public areas or inside a bank or business
  • avoid using card readers with an irregular or unusual feature
  • cover the keypad with one hand when entering your PIN
  • check for any unauthorized transactions on your account statements

Criminals posing as taxi drivers often rob tourists along the route to and from Lima’s Jorge Chávez International Airport.

  • Use a secure taxi service when arriving at and leaving the airport
  • Exercise caution en route to and from your hotel

Thieves also pose as police officers to gain the confidence and cooperation of their potential victims.

  • If you are stopped by local authorities, ask to see official identification and record the officer’s name, badge number and district.
  • For traffic violations, request that the officer issue you a fine in writing, which is payable at a later date.
  • You should also note the location of the arrest.

Legitimate police officers have also extorted money in exchange for dismissing minor offences or traffic violations. They have also stolen money and valuables during searches.

  • If you are searched, even at the airport, ensure you have all your belongings before leaving
  • If you are planning to participate in volunteer activities in Peru, ensure that the company organizing your trip is legitimate
  • Make sure your accommodations and return arrangements are secure before travelling

Useful links

  • Lima Airport Partners
  • Overseas fraud
  • Volunteering abroad

Spiked food and drinks

Snacks, beverages, gum and cigarettes may contain drugs that could put you at risk of sexual assault and robbery.

  • Be wary of accepting these items from new acquaintances
  • Never leave food or drinks unattended or in the care of strangers

Women’s safety

Women travelling alone may be subject to some forms of harassment and verbal abuse. Incidents of sexual assault, including rape, occur throughout the country, particularly in tourist destinations. In some cases, tour guides have been implicated.

  • Do not travel alone, especially after dark.
  • Remain particularly vigilant at bus terminals and in taxis.
  • Be careful when dealing with strangers or recent acquaintances, especially regarding the acceptance of rides or other invitations.

Women reporting sexual assault should contact police immediately. Medical examinations at identified clinics are part of the investigation process. Women who have delayed reporting may experience more scrutiny by local authorities.

Advice for women travellers

Adventure tourism

Each year, several hikers and climbers are victims of serious, sometimes fatal, accidents in the Andes, including at the Huayna Picchu peak near Machu Picchu and the Cordillera Blanca region in Huaraz, where Peru’s highest peaks are located.

The Inca Trail is usually closed each year in February for maintenance. Other trails, such as those found in Ollantaytambo, may be poorly marked. Hikers have become lost. Be aware that steep or slippery areas are neither fenced nor marked.

In November 2023, the Cusipata District in Quispicanchi Province closed two access routes to Vinicunca, the “Rainbow Mountain.” The closure follows violent disputes between the municipalities surrounding the access routes. Access to Vinicunca from Quispicanchi Province will be closed indefinitely, but access remains open via the Pitumarca District in Canchis Province.

Remote areas of Peru, where popular jungle excursions operate, may not have cellphone coverage or internet access.

If you intend to hike, trek or climb:

  • never do so alone, and always hire an experienced guide from a reputable company
  • only use licensed companies recommended by the Ministry of Tourism for adventure tours and sports
  • exercise extreme caution while climbing, as local authorities have limited rescue capabilities
  • buy travel insurance that includes helicopter rescue and medical evacuation
  • ensure that your physical condition is good enough to meet the challenges of your activity
  • make sure that you’re properly equipped and well-informed about weather and other conditions that may pose a hazard
  • inform a family member or friend of your itinerary, including when you expect to be back to camp
  • know the symptoms of acute altitude sickness, which can be fatal
  • obtain detailed information on trekking routes or ski slopes before setting out and do not venture off marked trails or slopes
  • always leave the contact information of the tour operator with your family and friends
  • always hire an experienced guide from a reputable company if you travel in remote areas
  • iPerú ‎ - Peruvian government’s Tourist Information and Assistance‎
  • APOTUR  - The Peruvian Association of Incoming and Domestic Tour Operators (in Spanish)
  • APAVIT   - Peruvian Association of Travel and Tourist Agencies (in Spanish)
  • APTAE - Peruvian association of adventure, eco, and specialized tourism (in Spanish)
  • Qualified Tourism Service Companies  - Ministry of foreign trade and tourism (in Spanish)

Water activities

There have been several recent white-water rafting accidents and drownings involving tourists, particularly on the Urubamba River near Cuzco. Companies offering white-water rafting, their guides and their equipment may not be held to the same standards as similar companies in Canada. Rescue services may not be consistent with international standards.

Coastal waters can be dangerous. Strong currents exist in the Pacific Ocean and in rivers. Life guards are not always present or properly trained at beaches.

Swimming in jungle lakes and rivers can be dangerous due to the presence of parasites and wildlife.

Seek advice and consult residents and local authorities about conditions before swimming, surfing or participating in other aquatic activities.

Water safety abroad

Ayahuasca ceremonies

Spiritual cleansing and ayahuasca ceremonies, offered by shamans and other individuals, involve consuming substances that can cause medical complications and severely impair cognitive and physical abilities. Exposure to these substances has led to serious illness, injury, assault and even the death of several tourists.

Ceremonies often take place in remote areas with no access to medical or mental health facilities or resources and limited communication with local authorities. Most of the time, the facilities lack basic first aid or emergency plans for those suffering from physical or psychological illness from these ceremonies. Ayahuasca ceremonies are not regulated and there is no way to assess the safety of any of the services, the operators or the shamans.

Road safety

Road conditions and road safety are poor throughout the country. Drivers are extremely aggressive, and they do not respect traffic laws. Mountainous roads can be particularly dangerous, especially at night. Poor signage also poses a hazard. Accidents causing fatalities are common.

Regular police spot checks can cause traffic delays.

When renting a vehicle, always purchase insurance. Most drivers in Peru have only the minimum required car insurance, which may not adequately cover accidents.

Vehicles are a target for robbery. Criminals have thrown objects in front of oncoming traffic in the hope that cars will stop. If this occurs and you need to stop, do so only in a safe location, such as a gas station.

  • While travelling by car, keep your doors locked and windows shut at all times
  • Keep your personal belongings in the trunk of the vehicle, as criminals have been known to shatter windows to “smash and grab” and to attempt entry when they see travel bags or merchandise
  • Avoid travelling by road outside of major cities after dark, when there is a higher risk of robbery

State of the roads in Peru in real time  – Government of Peru (in Spanish)

Thefts on boats by river pirates occur along rivers in the Amazon jungle.

Mariners should take appropriate precautions.

Live piracy report  - International Maritime Bureau

Public transportation

Buses and minibuses operate between most major cities. Demonstrations and strikes can lead to disruptions to traffic and public transportation.

Many of the buses and combis in Lima are old, poorly maintained and overcrowded. Drivers of these vehicles tend to dominate the roads and disregard other drivers or pedestrians.

Intercity bus travel can be dangerous due to the risk of bus accidents, which are usually caused by excessive speed, poor vehicle maintenance and driver fatigue. Armed gangs have been known to stop buses to rob travellers, especially at night. Incidents of assaults on buses have also been reported.

The Government of Peru publishes a list of the bus companies with the highest rates of involvement in fatal or serious injury traffic accidents.

  • Only use reputable transportation companies
  • Contact your travel agency for a list of recommended intercity bus companies

Ministry of Transportation  - Government of Peru (in Spanish)

Trains operate between Arequipa-Cusco-Puno and between Cusco-Ollantaytambo-Machu Picchu . Demonstrations, strikes and derailments can disrupt travel by train, including trains to or from Machu Picchu.

  • Train services – Peru rail
  • Train to Machu Picchu - Inca rail

Licensed taxis are not metered. Taxi drivers sometimes do not provide change or will continue to drive until they can obtain change.

  • Do not hail taxis on the street
  • Reserve a taxi by calling a reputable taxi company or use taxi services associated with major hotels
  • Agree to a fare prior to departure and do not pay until you have reached your destination
  • Try to carry the exact fare

We do not make assessments on the compliance of foreign domestic airlines with international safety standards.

Information about foreign domestic airlines

entry_restrictions_at_land_and_river_borders_with_ecuador

Entry restrictions at land and river borders with Ecuador

On January 11, 2024, the Government of Ecuador announced new entry restrictions in response to the ongoing state of internal armed conflict.

All foreigners entering Ecuador at crossing points with the land or river borders will need to present a criminal records check from their country of origin or residence. Both the original criminal record check and the Spanish translation must be apostilled, and cover the past five years. Minors travelling with their family members will generally be exempt.

The Apostille Convention took effect in Canada on January 11, 2024. An apostille is a standard certificate allowing documents to be accepted in all countries where the convention is in effect.

  • Migration information – Ecuador Immigration Agency (in Spanish)
  • Changes to authentication services in Canada
  • Apostilles for documents

Every country or territory decides who can enter or exit through its borders. The Government of Canada cannot intervene on your behalf if you do not meet your destination’s entry or exit requirements.

We have obtained the information on this page from the Peruvian authorities. It can, however, change at any time.

Verify this information with the  Foreign Representatives in Canada .

Entry requirements vary depending on the type of passport you use for travel.

Before you travel, check with your transportation company about passport requirements. Its rules on passport validity may be more stringent than the country’s entry rules.

Regular Canadian passport

Your passport must be valid for at least 6 months beyond the date you expect to leave Peru.

Passport for official travel

Different entry rules may apply.

Official travel

Passport with “X” gender identifier

While the Government of Canada issues passports with an “X” gender identifier, it cannot guarantee your entry or transit through other countries. You might face entry restrictions in countries that do not recognize the “X” gender identifier. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Other travel documents

Different entry rules may apply when travelling with a temporary passport or an emergency travel document. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

  • Foreign Representatives in Canada
  • Canadian passports

Tourist visa: not required for a stay of less than 90 days per 365 day period Business visa: required  Student visa: required

If you entered Peru with a business visa, you must obtain a certificate from the Peruvian Ministry of the Economy to prove that all Peruvian taxes on income earned during the trip have been paid prior to leaving the country. The certification is required even if no money was paid or earned and must be presented to the central Peruvian immigration office in Lima before departure.

Entering the country

You must register your entry into Peru at the port of entry or checkpoint.

  • Only cross the border at official checkpoints
  • Ensure the immigration office at your port of entry is open at the time you intend to cross the border

Other entry requirements

Customs officials may ask you to show them:

  • a return or onward ticket
  • proof that you have a place to stay
  • proof that you have sufficient funds for the duration of your stay

Length of stay

As a Canadian tourist, you may stay in Peru for up to 90 days in a 365-day period.

Overstaying is a criminal offence. There is a fine for each day of overstay. This fee must be paid upon exiting the country.

Dual citizenship

Peruvian–Canadians entering Peru using their Canadian passport are subject to visit restrictions, including length of stay and associated fines. Dual nationals must use the same nationality to enter and exit the country.

Children and travel

Travellers under 18 exiting Peru after a stay of 183 days are automatically protected by Peru’s law on minors and will require the authorization of both parents/guardians to exit the country.

Children who have resident status in Peru must have written permission from the non-accompanying parents to leave the country.

Children born of Canadian parents in Peru require a Peruvian passport to leave the country for the first time. Contact Peruvian immigration officials for more information.

  • Travelling with children

Yellow fever

Learn about potential entry requirements related to yellow fever (vaccines section).

Relevant Travel Health Notices

  • Global Measles Notice - 31 August, 2023
  • Zika virus: Advice for travellers - 31 August, 2023
  • COVID-19 and International Travel - 31 August, 2023

This section contains information on possible health risks and restrictions regularly found or ongoing in the destination. Follow this advice to lower your risk of becoming ill while travelling. Not all risks are listed below.

Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic preferably 6 weeks before you travel to get personalized health advice and recommendations.

Routine vaccines

Be sure that your  routine vaccinations , as per your province or territory , are up-to-date before travelling, regardless of your destination.

Some of these vaccinations include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, varicella (chickenpox), influenza and others.

Pre-travel vaccines and medications

You may be at risk for preventable diseases while travelling in this destination. Talk to a travel health professional about which medications or vaccines may be right for you, based on your destination and itinerary. 

Yellow fever   is a disease caused by a flavivirus from the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

  • There is a risk of yellow fever in this country.

Country Entry Requirement*

  • Proof of vaccination is not required to enter this country.

Recommendation

  • Vaccination is recommended depending on your itinerary.
  • Contact a designated Yellow Fever Vaccination Centre well in advance of your trip to arrange for vaccination.
  • Discuss travel plans, activities, and destinations with a health care professional.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites.

About Yellow Fever Yellow Fever Vaccination Centres in Canada * It is important to note that   country entry requirements   may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest   diplomatic or consular office   of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.

There is a risk of hepatitis A in this destination. It is a disease of the liver. People can get hepatitis A if they ingest contaminated food or water, eat foods prepared by an infectious person, or if they have close physical contact (such as oral-anal sex) with an infectious person, although casual contact among people does not spread the virus.

Practise  safe food and water precautions and wash your hands often. Vaccination is recommended for all travellers to areas where hepatitis A is present.

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease. It can spread quickly from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

Anyone who is not protected against measles is at risk of being infected with it when travelling internationally.

Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are fully protected against measles.

  Hepatitis B is a risk in every destination. It is a viral liver disease that is easily transmitted from one person to another through exposure to blood and body fluids containing the hepatitis B virus.  Travellers who may be exposed to blood or other bodily fluids (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment, sharing needles, tattooing, acupuncture or occupational exposure) are at higher risk of getting hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for all travellers. Prevent hepatitis B infection by practicing safe sex, only using new and sterile drug equipment, and only getting tattoos and piercings in settings that follow public health regulations and standards.

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious viral disease. It can spread from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

It is recommended that all eligible travellers complete a COVID-19 vaccine series along with any additional recommended doses in Canada before travelling. Evidence shows that vaccines are very effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19. While vaccination provides better protection against serious illness, you may still be at risk of infection from the virus that causes COVID-19. Anyone who has not completed a vaccine series is at increased risk of being infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 and is at greater risk for severe disease when travelling internationally.

Before travelling, verify your destination’s COVID-19 vaccination entry/exit requirements. Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are adequately protected against COVID-19.

 The best way to protect yourself from seasonal influenza (flu) is to get vaccinated every year. Get the flu shot at least 2 weeks before travelling.  

 The flu occurs worldwide. 

  •  In the Northern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs from November to   April.
  •  In the Southern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs between April and   October.
  •  In the tropics, there is flu activity year round. 

The flu vaccine available in one hemisphere may only offer partial protection against the flu in the other hemisphere.

The flu virus spreads from person to person when they cough or sneeze or by touching objects and surfaces that have been contaminated with the virus. Clean your hands often and wear a mask if you have a fever or respiratory symptoms.

Malaria  is a serious and sometimes fatal disease that is caused by parasites spread through the bites of mosquitoes.   There is a risk of malaria in certain areas and/or during a certain time of year in this destination. 

Antimalarial medication may be recommended depending on your itinerary and the time of year you are travelling. Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic before travelling to discuss your options. It is recommended to do this 6 weeks before travel, however, it is still a good idea any time before leaving.    Protect yourself from mosquito bites at all times:  • Cover your skin and use an approved insect repellent on uncovered skin.  • Exclude mosquitoes from your living area with screening and/or closed, well-sealed doors and windows. • Use insecticide-treated bed nets if mosquitoes cannot be excluded from your living area.  • Wear permethrin-treated clothing.    If you develop symptoms similar to malaria when you are travelling or up to a year after you return home, see a health care professional immediately. Tell them where you have been travelling or living. 

In this destination, rabies is carried by dogs and some wildlife, including bats. Rabies is a deadly disease that spreads to humans primarily through bites or scratches from an infected animal. While travelling, take precautions , including keeping your distance from animals (including free-roaming dogs), and closely supervising children.

If you are bitten or scratched by an animal while travelling, immediately wash the wound with soap and clean water and see a health care professional. Rabies treatment is often available in this destination. 

Before travel, discuss rabies vaccination with a health care professional. It may be recommended for travellers who are at high risk of exposure (e.g., occupational risk such as veterinarians and wildlife workers, children, adventure travellers and spelunkers, and others in close contact with animals). 

Safe food and water precautions

Many illnesses can be caused by eating food or drinking beverages contaminated by bacteria, parasites, toxins, or viruses, or by swimming or bathing in contaminated water.

  • Learn more about food and water precautions to take to avoid getting sick by visiting our eat and drink safely abroad page. Remember: Boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!
  • Avoid getting water into your eyes, mouth or nose when swimming or participating in activities in freshwater (streams, canals, lakes), particularly after flooding or heavy rain. Water may look clean but could still be polluted or contaminated.
  • Avoid inhaling or swallowing water while bathing, showering, or swimming in pools or hot tubs. 

Travellers' diarrhea is the most common illness affecting travellers. It is spread from eating or drinking contaminated food or water.

Risk of developing travellers' diarrhea increases when travelling in regions with poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Practise safe food and water precautions.

The most important treatment for travellers' diarrhea is rehydration (drinking lots of fluids). Carry oral rehydration salts when travelling.

Typhoid   is a bacterial infection spread by contaminated food or water. Risk is higher among children, travellers going to rural areas, travellers visiting friends and relatives or those travelling for a long period of time.

Travellers visiting regions with a risk of typhoid, especially those exposed to places with poor sanitation, should speak to a health care professional about vaccination.  

Insect bite prevention

Many diseases are spread by the bites of infected insects such as mosquitoes, ticks, fleas or flies. When travelling to areas where infected insects may be present:

  • Use insect repellent (bug spray) on exposed skin
  • Cover up with light-coloured, loose clothes made of tightly woven materials such as nylon or polyester
  • Minimize exposure to insects
  • Use mosquito netting when sleeping outdoors or in buildings that are not fully enclosed

To learn more about how you can reduce your risk of infection and disease caused by bites, both at home and abroad, visit our insect bite prevention page.

Find out what types of insects are present where you’re travelling, when they’re most active, and the symptoms of the diseases they spread.

There is a risk of chikungunya in this country.  The risk may vary between regions of a country.  Chikungunya is a virus spread through the bite of an infected mosquito. Chikungunya can cause a viral disease that typically causes fever and pain in the joints. In some cases, the joint pain can be severe and last for months or years.

Protect yourself from mosquito bites at all times. There is no vaccine available for chikungunya.

Cutaneous and mucosal   leishmaniasis   causes skin sores and ulcers. It is caused by a parasite spread through the bite of a female sandfly.

Risk is generally low for most travellers. Protect yourself from sandfly bites, which typically occur after sunset in rural and forested areas and in some urban centres. There is no vaccine or medication to protect against leishmaniasis.

  • In this country,   dengue  is a risk to travellers. It is a viral disease spread to humans by mosquito bites.
  • Dengue can cause flu-like symptoms. In some cases, it can lead to severe dengue, which can be fatal.
  • The level of risk of dengue changes seasonally, and varies from year to year. The level of risk also varies between regions in a country and can depend on the elevation in the region.
  • Mosquitoes carrying dengue typically bite during the daytime, particularly around sunrise and sunset.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites . There is no vaccine or medication that protects against dengue.

Zika virus is a risk in this country. 

Zika virus is primarily spread through the bite of an infected mosquito. It can also be sexually transmitted. Zika virus can cause serious birth defects.

During your trip:

  • Prevent mosquito bites at all times.
  • Use condoms correctly or avoid sexual contact, particularly if you are pregnant.

If you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, you should discuss the potential risks of travelling to this destination with your health care provider. You may choose to avoid or postpone travel. 

For more information, see Zika virus: Pregnant or planning a pregnancy.

American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease)   is a risk in this country. It is caused by a parasite spread by infected triatomine bugs. The infection can be inactive for decades, but humans can eventually develop complications causing disability and even death.

Risk is generally low for most travellers. Protect yourself from triatomine bugs, which are active at night, by using mosquito nets if staying in poorly-constructed housing. There is no vaccine available for Chagas disease.

Animal precautions

Some infections, such as rabies and influenza, can be shared between humans and animals. Certain types of activities may increase your chance of contact with animals, such as travelling in rural or forested areas, camping, hiking, and visiting wet markets (places where live animals are slaughtered and sold) or caves.

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, livestock (pigs, cows), monkeys, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats, and to avoid eating undercooked wild game.

Closely supervise children, as they are more likely to come in contact with animals.

There is a risk of   plague   in this country. Plague is a bacterial disease that can cause serious illness, and if left untreated, death.

The occurrence of cases in areas where the plague bacteria are known to circulate can be influenced by weather and environmental conditions. In some countries, this results in seasonal outbreaks. Travellers to areas where plague routinely occurs may be at risk if they are camping, hunting, or in contact with rodents.

Plague is spread by:

  • bites from fleas infected with the plague
  • direct contact with body fluids or tissues from an animal or person who is sick with or has died from plague

Overall risk to travellers is low.   Protect yourself   by   reducing contact with fleas  and potentially infected rodents and other wildlife.

Person-to-person infections

Stay home if you’re sick and practise proper cough and sneeze etiquette , which includes coughing or sneezing into a tissue or the bend of your arm, not your hand. Reduce your risk of colds, the flu and other illnesses by:

  •   washing your hands often
  • avoiding or limiting the amount of time spent in closed spaces, crowded places, or at large-scale events (concerts, sporting events, rallies)
  • avoiding close physical contact with people who may be showing symptoms of illness 

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) , HIV , and mpox are spread through blood and bodily fluids; use condoms, practise safe sex, and limit your number of sexual partners. Check with your local public health authority pre-travel to determine your eligibility for mpox vaccine.  

Tuberculosis is an infection caused by bacteria and usually affects the lungs.

For most travellers the risk of tuberculosis is low.

Travellers who may be at high risk while travelling in regions with risk of tuberculosis should discuss pre- and post-travel options with a health care professional.

High-risk travellers include those visiting or working in prisons, refugee camps, homeless shelters, or hospitals, or travellers visiting friends and relatives.

Medical services and facilities

Quality of care varies throughout the country.

Private hospitals and clinics in urban centres are well-staffed and -equipped to handle any emergency or medical issue. Public hospitals and rural facilities, even in some tourist destinations and major cities, may not meet Canadian standards or may be inadequate to treat serious conditions.

Cases of serious injury or illness in remote areas may require evacuation to the nearest adequate medical facility in the country. Clinic, hospital and evacuation expenses can be costly and the service provider often expects immediate cash payment or confirmation of payment from an insurance company.

Make sure you get travel insurance that includes coverage for medical evacuation and hospital stays.

Travel health and safety

Keep in Mind...

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety.

Be prepared. Do not expect medical services to be the same as in Canada. Pack a   travel health kit , especially if you will be travelling away from major city centres.

You must abide by local laws.

Learn about what you should do and how we can help if you are arrested or detained abroad .

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs are severe. Convicted offenders can expect lengthy jail sentences, regardless of the amount of narcotics seized at arrest.

If you are arrested in Peru, you should expect lengthy delays to resolve your case, pre-trial detention in harsh conditions and significant related expenses.

  • Pack your own luggage and monitor it closely at all times
  • Never transport other people’s packages, bags or suitcases

Drugs, alcohol and travel

Identification

You must carry photo identification at all times. Keep a photocopy of your passport in a safe place, in case it's lost or confiscated. Failure to show identification could result in detention.

Peruvian authorities may impose fines and other penalties for any action considered to be disrespectful at historical and archaeological sites such as Machu Picchu, Ollantaytambo and Saqsayhuaman. Visitors to Machu Picchu must adhere to strict regulations regarding entry restrictions and behaviour within the site. Check with your travel guide or agent for the latest information.

Peruvian law strictly prohibits the export of antiques and artefacts (huacos) from pre-colonial civilizations. Purchase reproductions of colonial or pre-colonial art from reputable dealers only and insist on obtaining documentation from Peru's National Institute of Culture to prove that the object is a reproduction and may be exported.

The export of coca tea bags and products is prohibited.

It is illegal to remove certain fauna and flora items from Peru. Items made from or displaying animals, insects or plants may be seized. If you are convicted of possession of such items, you could face heavy fines or jail sentences.

National Forest and Wildlife Service (SERFOR) - Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation of Peru (in Spanish)

Photography

It is forbidden to photograph military installations.

2SLGBTQI+ travellers

Peruvian law does not prohibit sexual acts between individuals of the same sex. However, homosexuality is not widely accepted in Peruvian society.

Travel and your sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex characteristics

Dual citizenship is legally recognized in Peru.

If you are a Canadian citizen, but also a citizen of Peru, our ability to offer you consular services may be limited while you're there. You may also be subject to different entry/exit requirements .

Travellers with dual citizenship

International Child Abduction

The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction is an international treaty. It can help parents with the return of children who have been removed to or retained in certain countries in violation of custody rights. The convention applies between Canada and Peru.

If your child was wrongfully taken to, or is being held in Peru, and if the applicable conditions are met, you may apply for the return of your child to the Peruvian court.

If you are in this situation:

  • act as quickly as you can
  • contact the Central Authority for your province or territory of residence for information on starting an application under The Hague Convention
  • consult a lawyer in Canada and in Peru to explore all the legal options for the return of your child
  • report the situation to the nearest Canadian government office abroad or to the Vulnerable Children’s Consular Unit at Global Affairs Canada by calling the Emergency Watch and Response Centre

If your child was removed from a country other than Canada, consult a lawyer to determine if The Hague Convention applies.

Be aware that Canadian consular officials cannot interfere in private legal matters or in another country’s judicial affairs.

  • List of Canadian Central Authorities for the Hague Convention
  • International Child Abduction: A Guidebook for Left-Behind Parents
  • The Hague Convention - Hague Conference on Private International Law
  • Canadian embassies and consulates by destination
  • Emergency Watch and Response Centre

You must carry an international driving permit. A foreign driver's licence can be used only in Lima and only for 30 days after arrival.

Carry identification and vehicle registration at all times.

International Driving Permit

The currency is the Peruvian sol (PEN). The U.S. dollar is widely accepted.

Credit cards are not commonly accepted outside major cities. Many establishments will request to see a passport to confirm the identity of the person using the credit card. 

ATMs are not easily accessible in small towns. They often have limits to the amount and number of daily withdrawals.

El Niño

The effects of “Coastal El Niño” are expected to begin in November 2023 and continue until April 2024.

Severe weather could occur, such as:

  • excessive rains
  • severe droughts

The complex weather phenomenon called El Niño happens at irregular intervals of 2 to 7 years. El Niño generally generates heavy rainfalls, occurring at the same time as the rainy season, from November to May.

  • Keep informed of regional weather forecasts before and during your travels, and plan accordingly.
  • Ensure you have adequate insurance to cover the consequences of such events, including the disruption of travel plans. 

Seismic activity

Earthquakes.

Peru is in an active seismic zone and is prone to earthquakes.

Dangerous landslides can also occur, even after minor earthquakes.

Latest earthquakes  - Government of Peru (in Spanish)

Tsunamis can occur following seismic activity. Tsunami evacuation routes are posted along the Costa Verde in Lima and several locations on the coast.

Directorate of Hydrography and Navigation  (in Spanish)

There are active and potentially active volcanoes in southern Peru. Debris from erupting volcanoes may clog rivers and cause them to overflow, resulting in potential flash floods and mudslides. Transportation and services may be affected. Ash clouds may cause disruptions to domestic and international flights. If you live or are travelling near active volcanoes:

  • monitor levels of volcanic activity through the local media
  • pay careful attention to all warnings issued and follow the advice of local authorities
  • Be prepared to modify your travel arrangements or even evacuate the area on short notice

Geophysical Institute of Peru  (in Spanish)

Higher tides are experienced several times throughout the year and may cause flooding and damage along the coast.

Rainy season

The rainy season extends from November to May in the Peruvian Andes.

Seasonal flooding, mudslides and landslides can hamper overland travel and reduce the provision of essential services such as utilities, emergency and medical care, food, fuel and water supplies. Roads may become impassable and bridges damaged.

Keep informed of regional weather forecasts and plan accordingly.

Tornadoes, cyclones, hurricanes, typhoons and monsoons

Local services

  • Police: 105
  • Tourist police: +51 980 122 335 (Whatsapp number)
  • Medical assistance: 116
  • Firefighters: 116

Consular assistance

For emergency consular assistance, call the embassy of Canada to Peru, in Lima, and follow the instructions. At any time, you may also contact the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa.

The decision to travel is your choice and you are responsible for your personal safety abroad. We take the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provide credible and timely information in our Travel Advice to enable you to make well-informed decisions regarding your travel abroad.

The content on this page is provided for information only. While we make every effort to give you correct information, it is provided on an "as is" basis without warranty of any kind, expressed or implied. The Government of Canada does not assume responsibility and will not be liable for any damages in connection to the information provided.

If you need consular assistance while abroad, we will make every effort to help you. However, there may be constraints that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide services.

Learn more about consular services .

Risk Levels

  take normal security precautions.

Take similar precautions to those you would take in Canada.

  Exercise a high degree of caution

There are certain safety and security concerns or the situation could change quickly. Be very cautious at all times, monitor local media and follow the instructions of local authorities.

IMPORTANT: The two levels below are official Government of Canada Travel Advisories and are issued when the safety and security of Canadians travelling or living in the country or region may be at risk.

  Avoid non-essential travel

Your safety and security could be at risk. You should think about your need to travel to this country, territory or region based on family or business requirements, knowledge of or familiarity with the region, and other factors. If you are already there, think about whether you really need to be there. If you do not need to be there, you should think about leaving.

  Avoid all travel

You should not travel to this country, territory or region. Your personal safety and security are at great risk. If you are already there, you should think about leaving if it is safe to do so.

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U.S. Embassy in Peru

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Trujillo and Pataz Regions, Peru  

The Peruvian government declared a 60-day State of Emergency for the provinces of Trujillo and Patazin the Region of Libertad, starting February 12, 2024.  During this time, a curfew is in place between the hours of midnight and 4:00a.m.  These curfew hours maybe subject to change with little to no warning.  The State of Emergency is in response to a spike in crime, with over 30,000 crimes registered in the region, 11,000 of which involved theft and robbery.

U.S. citizens throughout Peru are reminded to exercise increased caution and maintain situational awareness.  Remember to avoid large crowds, avoid traveling at night, and only carry minimal valuables on your person. If approached by someone who attempts to take your belongings, it is usually best to comply with their demands to maintain your personal safety. Be sure to store valuables in a hotel safe, or in a vehicle trunk while traveling, and to follow the instructions of local officials.

Actions to take:

  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Avoid crowds.
  • Follow the instruction of local officials.
  • Be vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive jewelry or watches.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by tourists.
  • Refer to our website for the latest Alerts and Messages for U.S. citizens:  https://pe.usembassy.gov/

For Assistance:

  • U.S. Embassy Lima, Peru Avenida La Encalada cdra. 17 s/n Santiago de Surco 15023, Lima +51-1-618-2000 [email protected] https://pe.usembassy.gov
  • U.S. Consular Agency Cusco Avenida El Sol 449 Cusco [email protected]
  • State Department – Consular Affairs +1-888-407-4747 or +1-202-501-4444
  • Peru Country Information
  • To receive alerts, enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program ( STEP ).  Need help?  Email:  [email protected] .
  • Follow us on  Facebook  and  Twitter

peru us travel advisory

Please visit the Visa page on our website https://pe.usembassy.gov/visas

Please visit the COVID page in our website https://pe.usembassy.gov/covid-19-information/ .

Please visit the Education page on our website https://pe.usembassy.gov/education

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Please call: 618-2000

Outside of Office Hours, contact: 618-2000

Outside of Peru: 51-1 618-2000

IMAGES

  1. Peru Travel Advisory Updated by U.S. State Department

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  2. Americans Face Issues Returning to US from Peru

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  3. US-State-Department-Issues-New-Travel-Advisory-For-Peru-resized

    peru us travel advisory

  4. Peru Travel Advisory Updated 2023

    peru us travel advisory

  5. U.S. State Department travel advisories this summer

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  6. The State Department Issued a New Travel Advisory for Peru

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COMMENTS

  1. Peru Travel Advisory

    November 15, 2023 Peru - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution K U T C Last Update: Reissued with updates to crime information. Exercise increased caution due to crime, civil unrest, and the possibility of kidnapping. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory. Do not travel to:

  2. Security Alert: Travel Advisory

    State Department - Consular Affairs +1-888-407-4747 or +1-202-501-4444 Peru Country Information To receive alerts, enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program ( STEP ). Need help? Email: [email protected]. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

  3. Travel Advisories

    Liechtenstein Travel Advisory: Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions: July 26, 2023: ... Peru Travel Advisory: Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution: November 15, 2023: ... Subscribe to get up-to-date safety and security information and help us reach you in an emergency abroad.

  4. Travel Information

    The current fee is approximately US$8.00 or S/.21.00. Travelers should be aware that Peruvian immigration authorities do not permit departure from Peru until all immigration matters, including fines and overstays, have been resolved. Contact Us

  5. Peru

    Learn about the current travel advisories, visa requirements, embassy and consulate locations, and bilateral relations between the United States and Peru. Find out how the U.S. is supporting Peru's COVID-19 response and vaccine delivery efforts.

  6. Travel Advisory: Peru

    August 12, 2020 Do not travel to Peru due to COVID-19 . Exercise increased caution in Peru due to crime and terrorism . Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory. Read the Department of State's COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

  7. Peru

    Hide Travel Health Notices There are no notices currently in effect for Peru. Hide Vaccines and Medicines Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor at least a month before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need.

  8. The United States issues new travel warning for Peru

    Posted: June 7, 2023 | Last updated: November 11, 2023 This week, the U.S. State Department issued an updated travel advisory for Peru. The travel warning reiterated its Level 2: Exercise...

  9. The US announces new travel advisories for Peru

    Updated May 09, 2023 9:54 PM Panoramic view of Lima, Peru. The U.S. State Department recently added new travel advisories for the country. Christian Vinces Shutterstock CORRECTION: An earlier...

  10. State Department travel advisory Peru: Hundreds of tourists stranded in

    The United States is in touch with American citizens stranded in Peru, a State Department Spokesperson told CNN on Friday. "We are providing all appropriate consular assistance, and are monitoring ...

  11. Is It Safe to Travel to Peru After the September 2023 State of

    The government of Peru has declared a state of emergency in parts of Peru, including much of the capital city, Lima. The U.K. Foreign Office has issued updated guidance for travel to Peru amid ...

  12. Places the U.S. Government Warns Not to Travel Right Now

    On Oct. 19, following the outbreak of war between Israel and Gaza and flaring tensions in the region, the U.S. State Department issued a worldwide caution advisory due to "increased tensions in...

  13. Travel Advisory Updates

    In order to provide U.S. travelers detailed and actionable information to make informed travel decisions, the Department of State regularly assesses and updates our Travel Advisories, based primarily on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Travel Health Notices (THNs) and secondary factors such as commercial flight availabil...

  14. Health Alert: Peru

    On January 24, the Department of State announced that the Travel Advisory for Peru has increased from Level 3 "Reconsider Travel" to Level 4 "Do Not Travel" due to the ongoing situation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Please be aware of the following:

  15. US State department updates travel advisory to Perú

    Travel Advisory Us State Department Peru Recommended for you The U.S. State Department regularly issues travel advisories to Americans traveling abroad and every country in the world is assigned a level between 1-4.

  16. Travel advice and advisories for Peru

    Canada.ca Travel Destinations Peru travel advice Exercise a high degree of caution (with regional advisories) Latest updates: Editorial change Last updated: January 30, 2024 17:00 ET On this page Risk levels Safety and security Entry and exit requirements Health Laws and culture Natural disasters and climate Risk levels

  17. US issues updated travel warning for Peru

    Plaza Mayor in Lima, Peru, surrounded by the Government Palace, Cathedral, Archbishop's and Municipal Palaces and Palace of the Union. The U.S recently issued a Level 2 travel advisory for the ...

  18. Travel Alert: Peru Travel Advisory Level Raised to Level 3: Reconsider

    June 30, 2022 Location: Peru Event: On June 29, the Department of State raised the travel advisory level for Peru from Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution to Level 3: Reconsider Travel. Those considering travel to Peru are advised to reconsider travel due to crime. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory. Do not travel to:

  19. How to Plan a Trip to Machu Picchu in 2024

    It used to be that you could visit Machu Picchu more than once on the same ticket—entering the Incan ruins at daybreak and then circling back around to see the afternoon sun cast its light on ...

  20. Travel Alert: Travel Advisory for Peru increased from Level 2 "Exercise

    On December 20, 2021, the Department of State announced that the Travel Advisory for Peru has increased from Level 2 "Exercise Increased Caution" to Level 3 "Reconsider Travel" due to the ongoing situation caused by the Covid-19 pandemic. Please be aware of the following:

  21. Alerts Archives

    An official website of the United States government. Here's how you know ... Travel Advisory Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution Travel Advisory Level 2: Last Update: Reissued with updates to crime information. ... Outside of Peru: 51-1 618-2000. Emergency Contact ...

  22. Security Alert: Curfew and State of Emergency declared in Trujillo and

    An official website of the United States government. Here's how you know ... Travel Advisory Level 2: ... U.S. Embassy Lima, Peru Avenida La Encalada cdra. 17 s/n Santiago de Surco 15023, Lima +51-1-618-2000 [email protected] https://pe.usembassy.gov;