Tour de France 2024 stages

  • Tour de France 2024 route
  • Tour de France past winners
  • Stage 1 | Florence - Rimini 2024-06-29 205km
  • Stage 2 | Cesenatico - Bologna 2024-06-30 200km
  • Stage 3 | Piacenza - Turin 2024-07-01 225km
  • Stage 4 | Pinerolo - Valloire 2024-07-02 138km
  • Stage 5 | Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne - Saint-Vulbas Plaine de l'Ain 2024-07-03 177km
  • Stage 6 | Mâcon - Dijon 2024-07-04 163km
  • Stage 7 | Nuits-Saint-Georges - Gevrey-Chambertin (ITT) 2024-07-05 25km
  • Stage 8 | Semur-en-Auxois - Colombey-les-Deux-Églises 2024-07-06 176km
  • Stage 9 | Troyes - Troyes 2024-07-07 199km
  • Rest Day 1 | Orléans 2024-07-08
  • Stage 10 | Orléans - Saint-Amand-Montrond 2024-07-09 187km
  • Stage 11 | Évaux-les-Bains - Le Lioran 2024-07-10 211km
  • Stage 12 | Aurillac - Villeneuve-sur-Lot 2024-07-11 204km
  • Stage 13 | Agen - Pau 2024-07-12 171km
  • Stage 14 | Pau - Saint-Lary-Soulan (Pla d'Adet) 2024-07-13 152km
  • Stage 15 | Loudenvielle - Plateau de Beille 2024-07-14 198km
  • Rest Day 2 | Gruissan 2024-07-15
  • Stage 16 | Gruissan - Nîmes 2024-07-16 187km
  • Stage 17 | Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux - Superdévoluy 2024-07-17 178km
  • Stage 18 | Gap - Barcelonnette 2024-07-18 179km
  • Stage 19 | Embru - Isola 2000 2024-07-19 145km
  • Stage 20 | Nice - Col de la Couillole 2024-07-20 133km
  • Stage 21 | Monaco - Nice (ITT) 2024-07-21 34km

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Tour de France stage 10 as it happened: Pello Bilbao wins as breakaway has its day

Live updates from the tenth stage of the 2023 Tour de France

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The first rest day has passed and the Tour de France is back. After Sunday's brutal finale on the Puy de Dôme , the race stays in Auvergne for stage 10, set to the backdrop of the region's volcanoes. 

I, Tom Davidson , will be bringing you updates of the racing throughout the day. I spent the last two weeks on the road, following the Tour from Bilbao to the Puy de Dôme. I was lucky to experience one of the best opening week GC slugfests ever from the roadside, but I'm calling a day for the breakaway today. 

The general classification contenders jostle on the Puy de Dôme at the Tour de France 2023

Stage 10: Vulcania > Issoire (167.2km) 

Tour de France 2023 stage 10 profile

Before the stage gets underway at 12:20 BST (13:20 CET), let's take a look at what's in store for the riders. 

Stage 10 offers a lumpy profile, with four category three climbs, and one category two. The peloton will be climbing from the flag drop, and will be spinning up and down throughout the day, with a downhill run-in to the line. 

Expect the GC contenders to bed in for a relaxed one after the first rest day. If a stage was ever scripted for the breakaway, it's this one. 

Here's how the general classification stands going into today's stage: 

1. Jonas Vingegaard (Jumbo-Visma) 38-37-46 2. Tadej Pogačar (UAE Team Emirates), at 17s 3. Jai Hindley (Bora-Hansgrohe), at 2-40 4. Carlos Rodriguez (Ineos Grenadiers), at 4-22 5. Adam Yates (UAE Team Emirates) at 4-39 6. Simon Yates (Jayco AlUla), at 4-44 7. Tom Pidcock (Ineos Grenadiers), at 5-26 8. David Gaudu (Groupama-FDJ), at 6-01 9. Sepp Kuss (Jumbo-Visma) at 6-45 10. Romain Bardet (dsm-firmenich) at 6-58

Barring disaster for any of the 10 riders, I suspect this will look the same come the end of the day. 

To find out who's leading the other competitions at the race, visit our up-to-date classifications tracker . 

Tour de France Femmes unveils Rotterdam Grand Départ for 2024

Annemiek van Vleuten blocks sun from her eyes as she smiles. Christian Prudhomme and Marion Rousse stand blurred in the background.

In case you missed it yesterday, next year's Tour de France Femmes avec Zwift will start in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. 

The event will begin on 12 August 2024 - so as to not clash with the Paris Olympics - and the first three of the eight stages will take place in the Netherlands. 

"The last few seasons have been a tale of Dutch ascendancy," said race director Marion Rousse in a press statement. "Starting from the home of these champions will kindle a great popular celebration. Expect their supporters to turn our in force."

It will be the first time the race has left France since it was added to the calendar last summer. It will also be the first edition that won't include Annemiek van Vleuten , winner of the recent Giro d'Italia Donne, who is scheduled to retire at the end of the season.

Full details of the route will be revealed on 25 October. 

A slow start? 

Here's an interesting stat for you. This year's Tour de France has set off slower than last year's edition. 

The average speed of the yellow jersey wearer Jonas Vingegaard is 42.1km/h over the first nine stages. After the same time last year, the race leader Tadej Pogačar averaged 44.5km/h.

This is no doubt a symptom of the tough Grand Départ held in the Basque Country, where the first two stages clocked around 3,000m of climbing each. 

Stage four to Nogaro - "the most boring Tour de France stage for a long time," according to Jasper Philipsen - also kept the average speed down. 

A post shared by Tour de France™ (@letourdefrance) A photo posted by on

There's an hour and a half until stage 10 begins. Don't forget to check out our how to watch the Tour de France guide , so you can tune into the action live, wherever you are in the world.

Sign-on has started in Vulcania ahead of stage 10. 

"What's Vulcania?" I hear you call. "That's not a place in France." 

Well, you're right. Vulcania is an amusement park, or as the tourist signs say, the European Park of Volcanism . It opened in 2001 and is jam-packed with volcano-themed educational fun. 

Of course, the WorldTour peloton is no stranger to amusement parks. In February this year, stage six of the UAE Tour began at Abu Dhabi's Warner Bros World - the world's largest indoor theme park, which cost $1 billion to develop. 

Vulcania project plans

3D model of the Vulcania amusement park. 

10 minutes to go until kilometre zero. 

While I'm busy covering today's Tour de France stage, my colleagues in the tech team are gathering all the best Amazon Prime Day deals . If you're after some new kit or a bike computer, go check our the discounts available. 

Stage 10 gets underway

Omar Fraile shelters under an umbrella at the Tour de France 2023

We're off! Christian Prudhomme waves his yellow flag and the race start is given. 

It is a hot day in Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, where ground temperatures are set to exceed 40 degrees celsius. Spare a thought for the riders, and my colleagues at the roadside. 

166km to go: The battle for the break has begun. There's a lot of movement at the front of the pack, but no move has stuck yet. 

161.5km to go: Bryan Coquard (Cofidis) and Krists Neilands (Isreal-Premier Tech) have kick-started an attack on the opening category-three climb. Three others have joined them, including Ineos Grenadiers rider Michal Kwiatkowski. 

159km to go: The gruppetto is forming. Fabio Jakobsen (Soudal Quick-Step), victim of some nasty road rash on stage four, is one of those out the back. As is birthday boy Caleb Ewan (Lotto Dstny). It's going to be a long day for the sprinters. 

152km to go: The GC men, for some reason, have bridged across to the breakaway. The gap to the peloton is 47 seconds. Ineos Grenadiers have missed the split. 

148km to go: We're about to reach the foot of the category-three Col de Guéry. Here's the climb details, courtesy of Strava, and the KOM time to beat, held by Valentin. 

The hilliest of the #TourdeFrance, Stage 10 appropriately starts in a volcano-themed park. Peep below ⬇️ for the Strava Segments that’ll test the riders today, kicking off with Col-de-Guéry: https://t.co/PQOdgw5q0G pic.twitter.com/BmN1c78ju5 July 11, 2023

146km to go: There's clearly some fresh legs in the peloton, because the racing is relentless. Jonas Vingegaard and Tadej Pogačar have now left the front group on the road and dropped back. We're still waiting on a clear breakaway to form. 

143km to go: You'd think you were watching a criterium at Crystal Palace here. Moves are flying out of the peloton, but they're all being kept on a tight leash at the moment. 

137.5km to go: Some of the top-10 contenders are struggling to keep up with the frantic start. Romain Bardet (dsm-firmenich) and David Gaudu (Groupama-FDJ) are both out the back. 

🇫🇷After Romain Bardet, it's now @GauduDavid exiting at the back of the peloton. Tough day for the French riders. 🇫🇷Après Romain Bardet, c'est maintenant @GauduDavid qui sort à l'arrière de peloton. Journée difficile pour les coureurs français. #TDF2023 pic.twitter.com/CsypyF1mpt July 11, 2023

131km to go: There's now two men off the front - Julian Alaphilippe and Matej Mohorič. 

126km to go: The Gaudu-Bardet group is now two minutes behind the yellow jersey. This could end up being a disaster for the Frenchmen.  

Krists Neilands was one of those who animated this stage early on. Here he is in action, stringing out the peloton. 

Krists Neilands on Tour de France 2023 stage 10

121km to go: The average speed so far is 41.2km/h. So much for a calm one after the rest day. 

117km to go: Wout van Aert (Jumbo-Visma), one of the pre-race favourites for the stage win, is also in the trailing group with Gaudu and Bardet. 

There's a rumour circulating around the peloton that this is the Belgian's final day at the Tour de France. He and his partner are expecting their second child, and the birth is due any day now. 

112km to go: There's a seven-man front group with around a one-minute advantage over the peloton. 

They are: Esteban Chaves (EF Education-EasyPost), Kasper Asgreen (Soudal-Quick Step), Pello Bilbao (Bahrain Victorious), Mattias Skjelmose (Lidl-Trek), Georg Zimmermann (Intermarché-Circus-Wanty), Nick Schultz (Israel-Premier Tech)  and Warren Barguil (Arkéa Samsic). 

110km to go: The frantic start is yet to settle down. We're about to head onto the third categorised climb of the day, the Col de la Croix Saint-Robert. 

Col de la Croix Saint Robert is another monster KOM - we'll see who maximized their recovery day: https://t.co/AQXIWcYoYz pic.twitter.com/ecQXph1Fn2 July 11, 2023

108km to go: Hats off to Stefan Küng. The Groupama-FDJ rider has given a monster tow to carry his leader David Gaudu back into the peloton. Romain Bardet has also rejoined the group. Panic over, les français. 

107.4km to go: Kasper Asgreen wins the day's only intermediate sprint. He won't care for the green jersey points, but there will be a nice prime heading to the Dane's bank account. 

105km to go: There's a second group on the road, 25 seconds behind the breakaway. In it are Julian Alaphilippe and Ben O'Connor, who is determined to bridge across. 

100km to go: The breakaway crests the stage's highest point - 1451m - and tucks in for the descent into the valley. Things are starting to settle down. 

94km to go: I've had word from my colleague, Adam Becket , who is on the ground in France. 

"I cannot stress how hot it is," he says of the near 40C temperatures. "If there was an extreme weather protocol for journalists, I would ask for it to be invoked." 

90km to go: The gap to the peloton is now at 2-43. I think it's fair to say the breakaway has been established. 

86km to go: Another one of my colleagues, Chris Marshall-Bell , would like to weigh in on the heat. 

"I would just like to say that it is unseasonably warm here in France," he says. "If I had the option of jumping head first into a freezing pool of water or sitting for the next six hours in this climbing gym-cum-press room, I would choose the former." 

85km to go: Esteban Chaves (EF Education-EasyPost) is on the attack. The Colombian champion leads solo up the Côte de Saint-Victor-la-Rivière, with a 30-second gap to the breakaway. 

79km to go: We're into the last 80km, so here's a reminder of the situation on the road. 

Esteban Chaves has shot out of a 14-man breakaway and is leading solo. The peloton is 3-20 in arrears. 

77.5km to go: Scrap that, Chaves is caught. Suddenly a day alone under the sun doesn't seem so attractive to the Colombian. 

72km to go: The breakaway continues to work well together, with the gap to the peloton stable, now at 3.13.

70.8km to go: Some sort of shoe / pedal issue going on for Giulio Ciccone (Lidl-Trek), who is hanging on to the team car while trying to put a shoe on with one hand. Problem apparently sorted, he's back and chasing back on to the bunch.

66.2km to go: If you're just joining us, allow us just to reiterate how strong this breakaway is looking. It's 14 riders strong, and includes Michał Kwiatkowski (Ineos Grenadiers), Julian Alaphilippe and Kasper Asgreen (both Soudal-Quick Step), Ben O'Connor (Ag2r-Citroën) and Matthias Skjelmose (Lidl-Trek). They're working well together too – the peloton is going to have a job to catch them.

62km to go: The Israel-PremierTech team car comes over the radio, addressing breakaway riders Krists Neilands and Nick Schultz: "Today we can win a second stage, you know that guys. Heads up and good luck."

58km to go: The gap to the breakaway has slowly been coming down. It's now 2.42 and the break may need to think about stepping up the pace if its going to survive.

54km to go: Perhaps Neilands (Israel-PremierTech) was inspired by his DS's words – he's attacked out of the breakaway, gaining a small gap. But the break looks motivated behind.

53km to go: 9 seconds for Neilands from the break, whose gap over the bunch is down to 2.15, with no less than Mathieu Van Der Poel plugging away on the front in pursuit.

51km to go: Julian Alaphilippe has a go! He's followed by Kwiatkowski, and the rest... Neilands is coming back fast.

46km to go: The riders are now on a long, long descent. It's followed by the climb of the cat-three climb of the Côte de Chapelle-Marcousse. That's six kilometres long at 5.6%, and then comes 25km of mainly downhill to the finish at Issoire.

45km to go: Mathieu Van Der Poel (Alpecin-Deceuninck) and Wout Van Aert (Jumbo-Visma) have slipped off the front of the peloton as it heads downhill.

41km to go: MVDP and WVA have 11 seconds on the peloton, and are 2.18 behind the break, which is enjoying renewed impetus after the attacks of Neilands and Alaphilippe. The kilometres are ticking by fast now.

The pair aren't making much headway on the breakaway, still at 2.18 as they approach the bottom of the Chapelle-Marcousse. They'll hope to deliver the killer blow when the road points uphill though.

32km to go: The break, and the chasing pair of Wout Van Aert and Mathieu Van Der Poel, are on the climb now. These two are 50sec ahead of the bunch and still 2.16 behind the break.

30km to go: Israel-Premier Tech's Neilands is leading solo, with a 26-second advantage. Van der Poel has been reeled in by the peloton. 

29.5km to go:  Let's not forget that this stage finishes with a downhill run-in to the line. It's prime Alaphilippe territory, provided the Frenchman doesn't give Neilands too big of a gap. 

28km to go: Neilands's advantage is stretching out. It now stands at 40 seconds. Can he hold on? 

Krists Neilands at the Tour de France 2023

22km to go: Neilands crests the final climb with a 25-second gap. Behind him, Chaves, Bilbao, O'Connor, Zimmermann and Pedrero chase. 

There has been no movement in the yellow jersey group for a while. 

18km to go: This is going to be a fast finale. Neilands's advantage has been slashed to 16 seconds, with Zimmermann leading the descent in the chasing group. 

12km to go:  14 seconds for Neilands now. The chasing group is hitting speeds of 75km/h on the descent to Issoire. 

10km to go: No surprise here, but Neilands has been awarded the prize for the day's most combative rider. He was one of the original animators of the breakaway from the flag drop, and is now 10km away from a momentous stage win. 

6.5km to go: Neilands is pedalling like there's no tomorrow. His speed is 60km/h as the road starts to flatten out. 12 seconds to the chasers.  

3km to go: Heartbreak for Neilands. He's caught by the Bilbao group.

There's more drama too, with a four-man group containing Alaphilippe just 22 seconds behind. 

1.7km to go: Ben O'Connor attacks! Bilbao follows closely on his wheel. Pedrero the only other who can hold on. 

1.1km to go: Zimmerman now goes over the top. Again Bilbao latches onto the attacker's wheel. 

Bilbao wins! 

He launches his sprint with 200m to go and holds his position to the line. Zimmerman second, while O'Connor finishes third. 

Hold tight, I'll have a full race report up soon. 

As promised, here's the full report from stage 10 of the Tour de France . 

Pello Bilbao wins tour de france stage 10 2023

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cycling news tour de france stages

  • Giro d'Italia

Tour de France 2024

The 2024 Tour de France will host a first Grand Départ in Italy along with gravel roads, several mountain tests and a first ever finish outside of Paris

cycling news tour de france stages

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Tour de France

Tour de France

  • Dates 29 Jun - 21 Jul
  • Race Length 3,492 kms
  • Race Category Elite Men

Updated: January 29, 2024

Tour de France 2024 overview

The 2024 Tour de France will begin on Saturday 29 June, with a first-ever Grand Départ in Italy. The 111th edition of Le Tour will run until Sunday 21 July, finishing in Nice. It will be the first time in the race's history that it will finish outside of France's capital due to the Olympic Games.

The race will feature four summit finishes across the three weeks, at Saint-Lary-Soulan Pla d’Adet and Plateau de Beille in the Pyrenees before Isola 2000 and Col de la Couillole in the Alps. There are three further mountain days, four hilly stages, and eight stages for the sprinters to target.

Two time trials feature in the route too, with a 25km course on stage 7 and a 34km final stage time trial into Nice. It marks the first time that the Tour de France will conclude with a race against the clock since the iconic Fignon-LeMond battle in 1989.

Gravel also makes an appearance at the Tour for the first time in 2024, with 32km of Champagne region white gravel roads included in stage 9's parcours.

The full route for 2024's edition was unveiled by race organisers ASO on October 25 at Paris' Palais des Congrès.

  • Tour de France 2024 route revealed
  • Tour de France 2024: Analysing the contenders
  • Geraint Thomas to ride both Giro d'Italia and Tour de France in 2024
  • Tadej Pogačar to race Tour de France, Olympics, and Worlds after Giro debut
  • Jumbo-Visma still expect Tadej Pogačar to threaten at Tour de France

Tour de France 2024 key information

When is the Tour de France 2024?  The 2024 edition of the Tour de France will start on Saturday 29 June and run until Sunday, 21 July.

Where does the Tour de France 2024 take place?  The 2024 Tour de France starts in Italy for the opening three stages, before moving to France for the remainder. For the first time in the race’s history, it will finish outside Paris, due to the 2024 Olympic Games in the French capital, with Nice stepping in to host the finale. In between the Tour will make use of its two staple high-mountain ranges, the Alps and Pyrenees.

Who won the Tour de France in 2023?  The 2023 edition was won by Jonas Vingegaard (Jumbo-Visma), with the Dane putting two-time winner Tadej Pogačar (UAE Team Emirates) to the sword for the second year in a row. The contest was evenly-matched until the stage 16 time trial in the Alps, where Vingegaard blew the competition to smithereens.

How old is the Tour de France?  The Tour Tour de France was first held in 1903. The 2024 edition is the 111th.

Who won the first Tour de France?  Maurice Garin was the first ever winner of the Tour de France in 1903, winning the opening stage and holding the lead all the way through.

Who has the most wins at the Tour de France?  Four riders stand at the top of the all-time honours list, with five victories each for Jacques Anqetuil, Eddy Merckx, Bernard Hinault, and Miguel Indurain They claimed their fifth titles, respectively, in 1964, 1974, 1985, 1995.

Tour de France 2024 route: Four summit finishes, two time trials and gravel roads

The 2024 Tour de France will feature four summit finishes, two time and some gravel roads after a testing start in Italy.

The route for the 111th edition of the race was officially unveiled to the world in Paris’ Palais des Congrès on October 25th by race organisers ASO.

An Italian Grand Départ for the first time ever was already known, so too were the race's final two stages, taking place around Nice as the traditional finish in Paris has been disrupted by the French capital gearing up for the Olympic Games. It marks the first finish outside Paris in the Tour de France's history.

Starting in Florence on June 29 and finishing, 21 stages and two rest days later, in Nice on July 21, the race will cover 3,405.6km, through Italy, San Marino, Monaco and France, with a total of 52,230m of elevation gain.

The race's mountain-heavy focus across the board is clear to see, with a hilly opening few days in Italy followed by a return to France with a bang. Stage 4 sees the race head north from Pinerolo in Italy and the only way is via the Alps. An early meeting with the Col du Galibier before a finish down in Valloire on stage 4 means the highest point in the 2024 Tour will come on the first day of racing on French soil.

Once that's tackled, the Tour de France heads north for a time trial and some gravel roads along France's eastern flank.

As the race enters its second half, back-to-back summit finishes await in the Pyrenees before the riders return to the Alps with finishes atop Isola 2000 and La Colmiane likely to play a deciding factor in the overall standings.

Even after the Alps are dealt with, a final stage individual time trial from Monaco to Nice still includes some climbing, with both La Turbie and Col d'Èze to be tackled before the three weeks can officially be drawn to a close and the winner crowned.

The 2024 Tour de France route will feature gravel for the first time

The 2024 Tour de France route will feature gravel for the first time

Despite the race actually featuring 4,170m less elevation gain that the 2023 edition, its bookend positioning is likely to keep the sprinters up at night. The 2024 Tour de France route will traverse four different mountain ranges over the three weeks, including the Apennines in Italy, both the Italian and French Alps, the Massif Central and the Pyrenees. Of the seven mountain stages, four of them will be summit finishes: Saint-Lary-Soulan Pla d’Adet, Plateau de Beille, Isola 2000 and the Col de la Couillole.

Meanwhile, away from the climbing, there's an increase to the time trialling distance at the 2024 Tour de France. Compared to 110th edition's meagre serving of just 22km, there will be 59km against the clock in 2024 on stages 7 and 21. The first ITT is a 25km rolling test, whilst the final stage measures 34km from Monaco to Nice which includes the La Turbie and Col d’Eze climbs before a long descent back to the coast for a short run up and down the Promenade des Anglais to finish the Tour.

The sprinters will be buoyed by at least seven possible chances of glory, however they will first have to battle through the opening few days in the Apennines and Alps.

Arguably one of the most eye-catching days of the race will fall on stage 9, with 32km of white gravel roads included on the route that starts and finishes in Troyes. The hilly stage features 14 gravel sectors across its 199km distance, with the first arriving after 47km and the last just 10km from the line.

For a full look at the route, including a breakdown of each of the three weeks, head to our route announcement page .

Tour de France 2024 contenders: Vingegaard, Roglič, Evenepoel and surely Pogačar

Although the route has not yet been officially unveiled, it’s already clear that we will have a stellar cast of Grand Tour stars for the 2024 Tour de France. Jonas Vingegaard , winner of the past two editions is all but certain to return to go for the triple, and build his season around that target.

It’s also no secret that Primož Roglič , having won the Giro d’Italia last year and the Vuelta a España three times before that, has made the Tour the central ambition of what remains of his career. He has forced an exit from Jumbo-Visma precisely to make that happen, and will certainly lead the line for his new team Bora-Hansgrohe next July.

Remco Evenepoel (Soudal Quick-Step) has also strongly indicated that 2024 is the time for his Tour de France debut, even if the Giro d’Italia’s hefty helping of time trialling might give him some cause for doubt. The 23-year-old Belgian won the Vuelta in 2022 but was forced out of this year’s Giro with COVID-19 before an off-day derailed his Vuelta, but he is eager to make the next step to the highest rung of Grand Tour riders.

There is a little more doubt surrounding the other member of the superstar tier of contenders, Tadej Pogačar (UAE Team Emirates), who has been linked with a debut at the Giro. The Slovenian won the Tour twice in 2020 and 2021 but has been runner-up to Vingegaard for the past two years and, for a rider so keen on variety, 2024 may well be the time to shake things up. Even if he did the Giro, it’s unlikely UAE would let him miss the Tour entirely. Whether he could win both is another matter – no one has done it since Marco Pantani in 1998.

Ineos Grenadiers won seven yellow jerseys in the nine years from 2012 to 2019, but have fallen from their perch and don’t appear to have a rider on the same level of those listed above, with Carlos Rodríguez and possibly Geraint Thomas to carry the torch.

Which teams are racing the Tour de France 2024?

The 2024 Tour de France will comprise 22 teams, 18 of which are the WorldTour teams , and two of which are set to be the automatically-invited top two second-division ProTeams . That leaves two wildcard slots for the organisers to grant to teams of their choosing.

  • AG2R Citroën
  • Alpecin-Deceuninck
  • Arkéa Samsic
  • Astana Qazaqstan
  • Bahrain Victorious
  • Bora-Hansgrohe
  • dsm-firmenich
  • EF Education-EasyPost
  • Groupama-FDJ
  • Ineos Grenadiers
  • Intermarché-Circus-Wanty
  • Jayco AlUla
  • Jumbo-Visma
  • Soudal-Quick Step
  • UAE Team Emirates
  • Lotto Dstny (if they take up their invite)
  • Israel-Premier Tech (if they take up their invite)
  • Wildcard invite (TBC)

Tour de France jerseys

As well as 21 stage wins, there are also four distinctive jerseys up for grabs at the Tour de France, with each of the four awarded to a rider at the end of each stage, before the ultimate winner is crowned at the end of the race.

The jersey winners at the 2023 Tour de France

© Velo Collection (TDW) / Getty Images

The jersey winners at the 2023 Tour de France

Yellow jersey (maillot jaune) –  worn by the leader of the general classification, the rider with the lowest overall time.

Polka dot jersey (maillot à pois) –  worn by the leader of the mountains classification, with points awarded on all categorised climbs.

Green jersey (maillot vert) –  worn by the leader of the points classification, which is based on finishing positions on all road stages. This is often a sprinter.

White jersey (maillot blanc) –  worn by the best young rider, being 25 or under, on the general classification.

Additional classifications:  There is a teams classification, where the riders of the leading team wear yellow dossards (bib numbers), and a combativity prize, where the boldest rider from the previous stage wears a red dossard, with an overall combativity award presented at the end.

What happened at the Tour de France 2023?

Jonas Vingegaard (Jumbo-Visma) won the 2023 Tour de France, claiming his second straight yellow jersey after another entertaining battle with Tadej Pogačar (UAE Team Emirates)

Vingegaard landed the first real blow, gaining over a minute on the first Pyrenrean stage in the opening week, but Pogačar hit back the very next day, dropping Vingegaard en route to stage victory at Cauterets. The pair were locked in battle throughout the second week, with Pogačar the chief aggressor on the Puy de Dome, Grand Colombier, and the Col de Joux Plane that preceded the finish in Morzine.

However, he could not shake Vingegaard, and he was knocked for six on the opening day of the final week as the Dane produced one of the most stunning time trial displays in recent memory, taking more than 90 seconds on the hilly TT in the Alps. This time, Pogačar could not fight back, and he fell apart the next day on the tough stage over the Col de la Loze to Courchevel, falling to more than seven minutes down.

There was one final kick-back, as Pogačar won the penultimate stage on the Markstein, but Vingegaard was sailing by that point, and rode into Paris to seal his second Tour de France title.

The green jersey was won by Jasper Philipsen (Alpecin-Deceuninck), who won four sprint stages, while the polka-dot mountains jersey was won by Lidl-Trek’s Italian Giulio Ciccone. Pogačar was the best young rider in his last year of eligibility, while Jumbo-Visma topped the teams classification.

Tour de France history

This maiden Tour started in Montgeron and finished in Paris, visiting Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Bordeaux and Nantes along the way. Many of the stages in this first edition exceeded 400km in length, forcing riders to race throughout the night. The home favourite, Maurice Garin, won this inaugural edition and in doing so etched his name into the cycling history books. The Frenchman, affectionately known as ‘The Little Chimney Sweep’, won the first edition by a massive margin of two hours, 59 minutes and 21 seconds - the largest ever winning margin in the history of the race.

In the editions that followed the race snowballed in popularity and soon inspired similar races elsewhere in Europe, most notably in Italy with the Giro d’Italia. During these early years Desgrange toyed with the race’s format and in 1910 he sent the race on its first foray into the Pyrenees, setting a precedent that would remain for nearly every edition since.

He changed the race once again in the 30s when he introduced the concept of national teams, forcing riders to race for their countries rather than their trade teams. After a brief hiatus during World War II the race returned in 1947 under the control of a new chief organiser, Jacques Goddet. Goddet orchestrated the race up until 1986, slowly moulding it into the three-week race we all know and love today.

Over these post-war years, each decade has been dominated by a different rider - their names almost as famous as the Tour itself. Jacques Anquetil dominated during the 60s, Eddy Merckx the 70s, Bernard Hinault the 80s and Miguel Indurain the 90s. These four riders also share the record for the largest number of wins, having won five overall titles apiece.

France dominates the winners list in this race, with 36 wins from 109 editions. Despite topping this list, the home nation has failed to win since 1985 when Hinault took his fifth and final overall title. Several Frenchman have come close over the years - most recently Romain Bardet who placed second in 2016 - but none have managed to bring home the coveted yellow jersey and end the 38-year drought.

It’s France’s sporting rivals, Great Britain, who dominated the race during the last decade. Since 2012, British riders have taken six overall titles with three different riders - Bradley Wiggins (2012), Chris Froome (2013, 2015, 2016 and 2017) and Geraint Thomas (2018). All three of these riders rode for Team Sky during their Tour-winning years, a team that dominated the Grand Tours for the best part of a decade. In 2019 they won their seventh Tour title in just eight years, with the young Colombian, Egan Bernal.

The British team, however, have fallen from their perch, with UAE Team Emirates and Jumbo-Visma usurping them in the UCI rankings and sharing the past four Tours between them. The Vingegaard-Pogačar rivalry has served up a thrilling modern chapter of the Tour de France, and witg Evenepoel and Roglič joining the fray from different angles, the 2024 edition promises to be a blockbuster.

Explore more about the Tour de France by clicking on the tabs above.

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Pogacar wins the Giro d’Italia by a big margin and will now aim for a 3rd Tour de France title

Tour of Italy winner Slovenia's Tadej Pogacar holds the trophy during the podium ceremony at the end of the 21st and last stage of the Giro D'Italia, cycling race, in Rome, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Tour of Italy winner Slovenia’s Tadej Pogacar holds the trophy during the podium ceremony at the end of the 21st and last stage of the Giro D’Italia, cycling race, in Rome, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Slovenia’s Tadej Pogacar, wearing the pink jersey overall leader, crosses the finish line of the 21st and last stage of the Giro D’Italia, tour of Italy cycling race, in Rome, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Cyclists are cheered by fans as they ride past the ancient Colosseum during the final stage of the Giro d’Italia cycling race in Rome, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (Gian Mattia D’Alberto/LaPresse via AP)

Slovenia’s Tadej Pogacar, wearing the pink jersey overall leader, flashes the victory sign after crossing the finish line of the 21st and last stage of the Giro D’Italia, tour of Italy cycling race, in Rome, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Cyclists, including the pink jersey overall leader Slovenia’s Tadej Pogacar, ride past the ancient Colosseum during the final stage of the Giro d’Italia cycling race in Rome, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

From left, second classified Colombia’s Daniel Felipe Martinez, first classified Slovenia’s Tadej Pogacar and third classified Britain’s Geraint Thomas celebrate during the podium ceremony at the end of the 21st and last stage of the Giro D’Italia, tour of Italy cycling race, in Rome, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Third classified Britain’s Geraint Thomas celebrates during the podium ceremony at the end of the 21st and last stage of the Giro D’Italia, tour of Italy cycling race, in Rome, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Slovenia’s Tadej Pogacar, wearing the pink jersey of the race overall leader, is lifted in celebration by teammates ahead of the start of the final stage of the Giro d’Italia cycling race, in front of the Palazzo della Civilta’ Italiana, also known as Colosseo Quadrato (Square Colosseum) in Rome, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (Marco Alpozzi/LaPresse via AP)

Belgium’s Tim Merlier celebrates winning the final stage of the Giro d’Italia cycling race in Rome, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (Gian Mattia D’Alberto/LaPresse via AP)

Cyclists ride past the ancient Colosseum during the final stage of the Giro d’Italia cycling race in Rome, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (Massimo Paolone/LaPresse via AP)

Slovenia’s Tadej Pogacar, 2nd right, wearing the pink jersey of the race overall leader, poses as he waits for the start of the final stage of the Giro d’Italia cycling race, in front of the Palazzo della Civilta’ Italiana, also known as Colosseo Quadrato (Square Colosseum) in Rome, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (Marco Alpozzi/LaPresse via AP)

Cyclists ride past the ancient Colosseum during the final stage of the Giro d’Italia cycling race in Rome, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Cyclists ride past the Unknown Soldier monument during the final stage of the Giro d’Italia cycling race, in Rome, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (Fabio Ferrari/LaPresse via AP)

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ROME (AP) — Tadej Pogacar won the Giro d’Italia on Sunday with the race’s biggest margin of victory in nearly six decades — earning a third Grand Tour trophy to go with his two Tour de France titles.

Pogacar, riding a pink bike to go with his pink jersey, shorts and helmet, crossed safely in the main pack to conclude the mostly ceremonial final stage of the three-week race in Rome, ending with an advantage of 9 minutes, 56 seconds over runner-up Daniel Martinez.

Geraint Thomas finished third overall, 10:24 behind.

The last time there was a bigger margin of victory in the Giro came in 1965, when Vittorio Adorni won by 11:26.

Pogacar, a Slovenian with UAE Team Emirates, also won six stages in the race, the most since Eddy Merckx also won six in 1973.

“Winning any bike race is important but winning the Giro, especially like this, is really incredible,” Pogacar said.

Now Pogacar will attempt to rest and recover in time to make an attempt at winning his third Tour title, with cycling’s biggest race starting on June 29 with four stages in Italy.

Pogacar will be attempting to become the first rider to win the Giro and the Tour in the same year since Marco Pantani in 1998.

Slovenia's Tadej Pogacar, wearing the pink jersey of the race overall leader, holds his bike up as he celebrates after winning the 20th stage of the Giro d'Italia cycling race from Alpago to Bassano del Grappa, Italy, Saturday, May 25, 2024. (Fabio Ferrari/LaPresse via AP)

“This was the big goal for the first part of the season. Now finally I’ll have a bit of rest before the second part, which could be the more important part,” Pogacar said. “We’ll see.”

Belgian rider Tim Merlier won the final stage in a sprint ahead of Jonathan Milan by the Colosseum. It was Merlier’s fourth career win at the Giro and third this year.

Milan, the Italian sprinter who also won three stages in the race, had a mechanical issue and needed to change his bike at the start of the last lap. He then managed to catch up with the main pack and almost grabbed another victory.

The 125-kilometer (78-mile) mostly flat final stage finished with a circuit through the center of the capital that was completed eight times, taking riders past the Baths of Caracalla, the Roman Forum, the Tiber River and the Circus Maximus before the finish on cobblestones near the Arch of Constantine.

Pogacar entered the Giro for the first time this year and made an immediate impact. He finished second in the opening stage in Turin and gained time on almost all of his direct rivals. Then he won the second stage, grabbed the leader’s pink jersey and kept on increasing his advantage day after day.

Pogacar won the Tour in 2020 and 2021 and then finished second behind Jonas Vingegaard in 2022 and 2023.

Vingegaard is hoping to defend his Tour title despite a crash in April that left him with several broken ribs and a collapsed lung.

AP cycling: https://apnews.com/hub/cycling

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