Simple Flying

Sunwing passengers stranded in mexico because of cancellations.

Sunwing passengers in a few Latin American countries have been stranded for multiple days.

The winter storms gripped North America and have affected Sunwing Airlines almost as much as Southwest Airlines this week . Passengers of Sunwing have found themselves needing a flight out of Cancun International Airport (CUN) and other Latin American airports back to Canada .

Sunwing Airlines stranding thousands throughout Latin America

shutterstock_2087742370 - Silhouette of young man standing next to window at Pearson International airport, out of focus airplanes and runway in the background. Includes Sunwing Airline Boeing 737

Canadian media reports that thousands are stranded throughout Latin America, waiting for their Sunwing Airlines flight home to Canada. According to a December 26 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) report, passengers have been stranded since December 22 in Cancun.

Poor communication from the airline to stranded passengers has emerged as a serious issue. For Tess Friedenberger, who was scheduled to fly home to Calgary on December 22 on Sunwing, the frustration is,

"It's the lack of communication and the not knowing what's going to happen and the bouncing around. If you know we're not going to get home until Dec. 28, that's fine. Tell us that, and put us up in a room at one hotel."

Instead, Sunwing Airlines has been shuffling stranded passengers between Latin American hotels. This has been reported to happen not just in Cancun but also in Puerto Vallarta.

Sheldon de Souza was one of the passengers left stranded in Puerto Vallarta. According to the Canadian Press, Sheldon was able to rebook for a Christmas Day flight home. Still, crew rest regulations were violated, so the return flight had to be canceled. As de Souza told the Canadian Press:

"It felt like Sunwing just abandoned us, they didn't care. It's not even that they made an effort, they forgot us."

Get all the latest aviation news for North America here.

Options for Sunwing Airlines customers

According to a Sunwing Airlines travel advisory posted December 24, the following options exist for those with flight delays at or longer than 24 hours, as well as tickets for flights “up to and including December 30, 2022”,

  • Customers can cancel their flight or vacation and receive a full refund to the original form of payment by contacting their travel agent or the Sunwing Sales Centre at 1-877-786-9464, provided the cancellation request is made prior to the customer's departure.
  • Customers who would prefer to make a one time change to their travel plans may do so by contacting their travel agent or the Sunwing Sales Centre, and we will waive the fee for changes of travel date or destination. Current system rates will apply.
  • Those customers who would prefer to travel as planned are encouraged to sign up for flight alerts on Sunwing.ca for information on revised travel times, but should note that additional delays may occur. Those with southbound departures should also allow plenty of time to arrive at their airport.

For filing claims to Sunwing, Sunwing Airlines posted the below directions:

Claims for compensation can be submitted for review at www.sunwing.ca/en/sunwing-airlines/delay-claim/ and should be submitted a minimum of 48 hours after the flight arrives at its destination. Passengers may also submit their receipts for related expenses to Sunwing Cares for review at www.sunwing.ca/en/sunwing-cares .

The carrier did also submit they “Sincerely regret the impact to travel plans over the holidays and thank our customers for their understanding.”

Get the latest aviation news straight to your inbox: Sign up for our newsletters today.

Potential litigation in Canadian court

shutterstock_2171176459 - Candian flag and judge's gavel

Also in the December 26 Canadian Press article was this retort by Gabor Lukacs, president and founder of the Air Passenger Rights group.

We're at a point in Canada where suing an airline is not simply about your own money, it's about changing how they operate. It's about behaviour modification. And that's where the government is derelict in its duties to the public.

Since Sunwing Airlines is a Canadian airline, the airline falls under Canadian law. Canadian courts are proven receptive to litigation under the Montreal Convention and may be under other points of Canadian aviation law.

Sources: Daily Hive News , Canadian Broadcasting Corporation , Canadian Press

Flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS A lock ( Lock A locked padlock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

sunwing travel advisory mexico

U.S. Embassy & Consulates in Mexico

Side Navigation Logo

Location:   Mexico

Event:   The U.S. Department of State updated the  Mexico Travel Advisory  and the  Mexico country information page  on August 22, 2023.  The Travel Advisory includes individual risk assessment levels for each state.

Actions to Take:

  • Read the  Mexico Travel Advisory , including the detailed state summaries and advisory levels for information on your specific travel destination.
  • Read the  Mexico country information page .

Assistance:

Contact Form

U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Mexico

From Mexico: (55) 8526 2561

From the United States:  +1-844-528-6611

Department of State – Consular Affairs:  +1-888-407-4747 or +1-202-501-444

Mexico International Travel Information

U.S. Passports

Smart Traveler Enrollment Program

Traveler’s Checklist

Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter

U.S. Embassy Mexico City on  Facebook  and  Twitter

sunwing travel advisory mexico

An immigrant visa is a document issued by a U.S. consular officer abroad that allows you to travel to the United States and apply for admission as a legal permanent resident (LPR). An immigration inspector of U.S. Customs and Border Protection of the Department of Homeland Security makes the final decision as to whether or not to admit you as an LPR. Once you are admitted as an LPR, you generally have the right to live and work in the United States permanently. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services of the Department of Homeland Security will mail your permanent resident card (often called a “green card”) to your new address in the United States, usually within three months of your entry into the United States. Please see 9 FAM 502.1-3 for a list of classification symbols and a brief description of each.

Getting an immigrant visa usually means that you will be able to live and work in the United States for as long as you want. A nonimmigrant visa, on the other hand, is generally for short-term visitors to the United States. You cannot stay in the United States permanently on a nonimmigrant visa, and you generally cannot work. A nonimmigrant visa is sometimes informally called a “tourist visa” but can be issued for reasons other than tourism, such as medical treatment, business or study. Please see our nonimmigrant visa page for more information.

There are three basic methods for obtaining an immigrant visa: 1.through a family relationship with a U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident 2.through employment 3.through the Diversity Immigrant Visa Program (the visa lottery) Most applicants in Mexico obtain their immigrant visas via family relationships. The first step in obtaining a family-based immigrant visa is for your relative (the petitioner) to file a Form I-130 (Petition for Alien Relative) by mail with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) of the Department of Homeland Security. Once your relative has filed a petition for you, you may check its status by accessing the USCIS Case Status Search Page. You may obtain an immigrant visa through employment rather than through a family member. More information on obtaining an immigrant visa through employment rather than through a family member is available on USCIS’s Green Card through a Job page. Please see the Fiscal Year 2016 Diversity Visa Entry Instructions. Note that the registration period for 2015 has closed. You may check this page for the Fiscal Year 2016 Diversity Visa Entry instructions in approximately September 2014.

Once U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) of the Department of Homeland Security approves an immigrant visa petition, USCIS sends the approved petition to the Department of State’s National Visa Center in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

The Department of State’s National Visa Center (NVC) retains the approved petition until the case is ready for adjudication by a consular officer abroad. Petitions may remain at NVC for several months or for many years depending on the visa category and country of birth of the visa applicant. When a beneficiary’s (the beneficiary is the person on whose behalf the petition was filed) priority date appears about to become current, NVC sends the petitioner a bill for processing Form I-864 (Affidavit of Support Under Section 213A of the Act) and sends the beneficiary a Form DS-261 (Choice of Address and Agent). Once the Form I-864 processing fee is paid, NVC sends the Form I-864 and related instructions to the petitioner. Once NVC receives the completed Form DS-261 from the applicant, NVC mails a bill for the immigrant visa fee to the agent designated on the Form DS-261. Once the immigrant visa fee is paid, NVC sends the Instruction Package for Immigrant Visa Applicants to the agent. You or your agent must follow the directions in the Instruction Package for Immigrant Visa Applicants exactly. Failure to do so could result in a delay in your case and could even cause you to lose your chance to live and work in the United States. Once NVC completes its administrative processing of your case, the case file is sent to the Immigrant Visa Unit of the U.S. Consulate General, Ciudad Juarez. NVC will notify you by mail when this occurs.

The priority date, in the case of a family-based immigrant visa petition, is the date your petition was filed (not the date it was approved). Family-based immigrant visas are divided into two broad groups, immediate relative cases and preference cases. An immediate relative family-based petition is filed by a U.S. citizen on behalf of a spouse, parent, or child. A preference family-based petition is filed by a U.S. citizen on behalf of a son, daughter, or sibling; or by a legal permanent resident on behalf of a spouse, son or daughter, or child. Because the law does not limit the number of immediate relative visas, the priority date is normally irrelevant in such cases (please see the 9 FAM 502.1-1(d)(1) for the notable exception, related to the Child Status Protection Act). Workload permitting, the Immigrant Visa Unit may begin processing the approved petition upon receipt from the Department of State’s National Visa Center or the Department of Homeland Security. The priority date in a preference case, however, matters greatly. The law limits the number of preference visas available. All categories of family-based preference visas are currently “oversubscribed” (i.e., there are more people who want visas than there are visa numbers available). Your priority date, along with your visa category and nationality, determines whether a visa number is available or whether you must wait. Once your priority date is earlier than the cut-off date listed in the most recent Visa Bulle

Use up to three keywords instead of using a full sentence for the best search results.

product warranty

free shipping offer

Would you help us improve our website

Note: This feature is strictly for feedback about your experience using the website. All other questions and feedback will be disregarded. Thank you for your understanding. You are visiting a website that just underwent a redesign. Please take a few moments to provide us with your valuable feedback.

Note: This feature is strictly for feedback about your experience using the website.

Please take a few moments to provide us with your valuable feedback. Note: This feature is strictly for feedback about your experience using the website. All other questions and feedback will be disregarded.

{{ error }}

* Please see our Contact Us page for more information on how to reach us.

Thank you for sharing your feedback!

From the United States: 1-844-528-6611

It looks like you are visiting us from the US. View our US site!

  • Group vacations
  • Destination weddings
  • Wedding services and packages
  • Wedding inspiration
  • Wedding promotions
  • Start wedding planning
  • Meet our wedding planners
  • Destination weddings FAQs
  • Things to do
  • All destinations
  • The Bahamas
  • Cayman Islands
  • Dominican Republic
  • Saint Lucia
  • St. Maarten
  • United States
  • About Sunwing Airlines
  • Baggage allowance
  • Flight status and alerts
  • In-flight service
  • Seat selection
  • Special assistance
  • Airport and web check-in
  • Vacation inspiration blog

From the sparkling shores of Riviera Maya to the dramatic rocky archways of Los Cabos and the bustling nightlife of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico is packed with variety from coast-to-coast. Whether your dream Mexico vacation consists of sipping margaritas beachside or racing along the coast on an ATV, there’s plenty to see and do in Mexico. Get inspired on how you can Vacation Better with our top Mexico vacation ideas, tips and advice!

Latest vacation inspiration

  • Test Blog Category Country
  • Real Weddings
  • Test Blog Category Wedding
  • Celebrity weddings
  • Expert advice
  • Test Blog Category Topic
  • Adults only
  • Sports and adventure
  • Spa and wellness
  • Celebrities and Influencers

4 reasons to explore Mexico

4 reasons to explore Mexico

7 beaches you have to experience

7 beaches you have to experience

5 things you didn't know you could do in Los Cabos

5 things you didn't know you could do in Los Cabos

5 words you should know before you leave for Mazatlán

5 words you should know before you leave for Mazatlán

6 getaways that are more than sun and sand

6 getaways that are more than sun and sand

Destination-inspired dishes

Destination-inspired dishes

4 reasons to visit Riviera Maya

4 reasons to visit Riviera Maya

4 places to explore in the Caribbean and Mexico

4 places to explore in the Caribbean and Mexico

Breathtaking beaches you need to see in your lifetime

Breathtaking beaches you need to see in your lifetime

Tropical-inspired books to curl up with this weekend

Tropical-inspired books to curl up with this weekend

12 zodiac-inspired vacation destinations

12 zodiac-inspired vacation destinations

5 must-stay resorts in Cancun

5 must-stay resorts in Cancun

Festivals and celebrations in the tropics you won't want to miss

Festivals and celebrations in the tropics you won't want to miss

5 unbeatable places to watch the sunset in the tropics

5 unbeatable places to watch the sunset in the tropics

5 vacations inspired by pop culture

5 vacations inspired by pop culture

Top adults only resorts in the tropics

Top adults only resorts in the tropics

5 reasons to discover Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo

5 reasons to discover Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo

4 sparkling pools with breathtaking views

4 sparkling pools with breathtaking views

6 hottest destinations to visit in 2019

6 hottest destinations to visit in 2019

6 vacation destinations off the beaten path

6 vacation destinations off the beaten path

5 ways to explore Mazatlán

5 ways to explore Mazatlán

4 can't miss beaches

4 can't miss beaches

Hottest new resorts to visit in 2020

Hottest new resorts to visit in 2020

Top ways to explore Pacific Mexico this winter

Top ways to explore Pacific Mexico this winter

5 ways to explore Cancun

5 ways to explore Cancun

The hottest resorts-within-a-resort

The hottest resorts-within-a-resort

Huatulco vacations for every travel style

Huatulco vacations for every travel style

Beach destinations for every travel style

Beach destinations for every travel style

Signature dishes to try on your tropical getaway

Signature dishes to try on your tropical getaway

5 things you didn’t know you could do in Mexico

5 things you didn’t know you could do in Mexico

5 places you’ll want to see in the New Year

5 places you’ll want to see in the New Year

5 reasons to travel right now

5 reasons to travel right now

Bucket list activities to try in Mexico

Bucket list activities to try in Mexico

5 ways to say goodbye to 2020

5 ways to say goodbye to 2020

Top three destinations you’re allowed to travel to right now

Top three destinations you’re allowed to travel to right now

Tropical playlists to get you in an island state of mind

Tropical playlists to get you in an island state of mind

The most screensaver-worthy destinations in paradise

The most screensaver-worthy destinations in paradise

Vacations for everyone on your gift list this holiday season

Vacations for everyone on your gift list this holiday season

4 things that are better in the tropics

4 things that are better in the tropics

Destination Spotlight: Mexico

Destination Spotlight: Mexico

The most beautiful national parks in paradise

The most beautiful national parks in paradise

5 of the most unique resort bars in Mexico

5 of the most unique resort bars in Mexico

6 cultural experiences you're missing out on

6 cultural experiences you're missing out on

Resort Spotlight: Planet Hollywood Beach Resort Cancun

Resort Spotlight: Planet Hollywood Beach Resort Cancun

Destination Spotlight: Riviera Maya

Destination Spotlight: Riviera Maya

  • Skip to main content
  • Skip to "About this site"

Language selection

Search travel.gc.ca.

Help us to improve our website. Take our survey !

Travel advice and advisories by destination

COVID-19: travel health notice for all travellers

The Government of Canada’s official source of travel information and advice, the Travel Advice and Advisories help you to make informed decisions and travel safely while you are outside Canada. Check the page for your destination often, because safety and security conditions may change. See Travel Advice and Advisories – FAQ for more information.

Where are you going?

Take normal security precautions

Exercise a high degree of caution

Avoid non-essential travel

Avoid all travel

Travel advice from other countries

Travel advice is also provided by the governments of Australia , New Zealand , the United Kingdom and the United States .

Risk Levels

  take normal security precautions.

Take similar precautions to those you would take in Canada.

  Exercise a high degree of caution

There are certain safety and security concerns or the situation could change quickly. Be very cautious at all times, monitor local media and follow the instructions of local authorities.

IMPORTANT: The two levels below are official Government of Canada Travel Advisories and are issued when the safety and security of Canadians travelling or living in the country or region may be at risk.

  Avoid non-essential travel

Your safety and security could be at risk. You should think about your need to travel to this country, territory or region based on family or business requirements, knowledge of or familiarity with the region, and other factors. If you are already there, think about whether you really need to be there. If you do not need to be there, you should think about leaving.

  Avoid all travel

You should not travel to this country, territory or region. Your personal safety and security are at great risk. If you are already there, you should think about leaving if it is safe to do so.

You are using an outdated browser. Upgrade your browser today or install Google Chrome Frame to better experience this site.

Mexico Traveler View

Travel health notices, vaccines and medicines, non-vaccine-preventable diseases, stay healthy and safe.

  • Packing List

After Your Trip

Map - Mexico

Be aware of current health issues in Mexico. Learn how to protect yourself.

Level 1 Practice Usual Precautions

  • Dengue in the Americas February 09, 2024 Dengue is a risk in many parts of Central and South America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. Some countries are reporting increased numbers of cases of the disease. Travelers to the Americas can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites. Destination List: Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, French Guiana (France), Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique (France), Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Saint Barthelemy, Saint Martin, Turks and Caicos Islands (U.K.)
  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Mexico December 11, 2023 There have been reports of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) in people traveling to the United States from Tecate, in the state of Baja California, Mexico.
  • Salmonella Newport in Mexico September 08, 2022 Some travelers who have spent time in Mexico have been infected with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Newport.

⇧ Top

Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor at least a month before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need. If you or your doctor need help finding a location that provides certain vaccines or medicines, visit the Find a Clinic page.

Routine vaccines

Recommendations.

Make sure you are up-to-date on all routine vaccines before every trip. Some of these vaccines include

  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR)

Immunization schedules

All eligible travelers should be up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines. Please see  Your COVID-19 Vaccination  for more information. 

COVID-19 vaccine

Hepatitis A

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers one year old or older going to Mexico.

Infants 6 to 11 months old should also be vaccinated against Hepatitis A. The dose does not count toward the routine 2-dose series.

Travelers allergic to a vaccine component or who are younger than 6 months should receive a single dose of immune globulin, which provides effective protection for up to 2 months depending on dosage given.

Unvaccinated travelers who are over 40 years old, immunocompromised, or have chronic medical conditions planning to depart to a risk area in less than 2 weeks should get the initial dose of vaccine and at the same appointment receive immune globulin.

Hepatitis A - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep A

Hepatitis B

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers younger than 60 years old traveling to Mexico. Unvaccinated travelers 60 years and older may get vaccinated before traveling to Mexico.

Hepatitis B - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep B

CDC recommends that travelers going to certain areas of Mexico take prescription medicine to prevent malaria. Depending on the medicine you take, you will need to start taking this medicine multiple days before your trip, as well as during and after your trip. Talk to your doctor about which malaria medication you should take.

Find  country-specific information  about malaria.

Malaria - CDC Yellow Book

Considerations when choosing a drug for malaria prophylaxis (CDC Yellow Book)

Malaria information for Mexico.

Infants 6 to 11 months old traveling internationally should get 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine before travel. This dose does not count as part of the routine childhood vaccination series.

Measles (Rubeola) - CDC Yellow Book

Rabid dogs are commonly found in Mexico. However, if you are bitten or scratched by a dog or other mammal while in Mexico, rabies treatment is often available. 

Consider rabies vaccination before your trip if your activities mean you will be around dogs or wildlife.

Travelers more likely to encounter rabid animals include

  • Campers, adventure travelers, or cave explorers (spelunkers)
  • Veterinarians, animal handlers, field biologists, or laboratory workers handling animal specimens
  • Visitors to rural areas

Since children are more likely to be bitten or scratched by a dog or other animals, consider rabies vaccination for children traveling to Mexico. 

Rabies - CDC Yellow Book

Recommended for most travelers, especially those staying with friends or relatives or visiting smaller cities or rural areas.

Typhoid - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Typhoid

Avoid contaminated water

Leptospirosis

How most people get sick (most common modes of transmission)

  • Touching urine or other body fluids from an animal infected with leptospirosis
  • Swimming or wading in urine-contaminated fresh water, or contact with urine-contaminated mud
  • Drinking water or eating food contaminated with animal urine
  • Avoid contaminated water and soil

Clinical Guidance

Avoid bug bites, chagas disease (american trypanosomiasis).

  • Accidentally rub feces (poop) of the triatomine bug into the bug bite, other breaks in the skin, your eyes, or mouth
  • From pregnant woman to her baby, contaminated blood products (transfusions), or contaminated food or drink.
  • Avoid Bug Bites

Chagas disease

  • Mosquito bite

Leishmaniasis

  • Sand fly bite
  • An infected pregnant woman can spread it to her unborn baby

Airborne & droplet

Avian/bird flu.

  • Being around, touching, or working with infected poultry, such as visiting poultry farms or live-animal markets
  • Avoid domestic and wild poultry
  • Breathing in air or accidentally eating food contaminated with the urine, droppings, or saliva of infected rodents
  • Bite from an infected rodent
  • Less commonly, being around someone sick with hantavirus (only occurs with Andes virus)
  • Avoid rodents and areas where they live
  • Avoid sick people

Tuberculosis (TB)

  • Breathe in TB bacteria that is in the air from an infected and contagious person coughing, speaking, or singing.

Learn actions you can take to stay healthy and safe on your trip. Vaccines cannot protect you from many diseases in Mexico, so your behaviors are important.

Eat and drink safely

Food and water standards around the world vary based on the destination. Standards may also differ within a country and risk may change depending on activity type (e.g., hiking versus business trip). You can learn more about safe food and drink choices when traveling by accessing the resources below.

  • Choose Safe Food and Drinks When Traveling
  • Water Treatment Options When Hiking, Camping or Traveling
  • Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene | Healthy Water
  • Avoid Contaminated Water During Travel

You can also visit the Department of State Country Information Pages for additional information about food and water safety.

Prevent bug bites

Bugs (like mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas) can spread a number of diseases in Mexico. Many of these diseases cannot be prevented with a vaccine or medicine. You can reduce your risk by taking steps to prevent bug bites.

What can I do to prevent bug bites?

  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
  • Use an appropriate insect repellent (see below).
  • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents). Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
  • Stay and sleep in air-conditioned or screened rooms.
  • Use a bed net if the area where you are sleeping is exposed to the outdoors.

What type of insect repellent should I use?

  • FOR PROTECTION AGAINST TICKS AND MOSQUITOES: Use a repellent that contains 20% or more DEET for protection that lasts up to several hours.
  • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin)
  • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or para-menthane-diol (PMD)
  • 2-undecanone
  • Always use insect repellent as directed.

What should I do if I am bitten by bugs?

  • Avoid scratching bug bites, and apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to reduce the itching.
  • Check your entire body for ticks after outdoor activity. Be sure to remove ticks properly.

What can I do to avoid bed bugs?

Although bed bugs do not carry disease, they are an annoyance. See our information page about avoiding bug bites for some easy tips to avoid them. For more information on bed bugs, see Bed Bugs .

For more detailed information on avoiding bug bites, see Avoid Bug Bites .

Some diseases in Mexico—such as dengue, Zika, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease—are spread by bugs and cannot be prevented with a vaccine. Follow the insect avoidance measures described above to prevent these and other illnesses.

Stay safe outdoors

If your travel plans in Mexico include outdoor activities, take these steps to stay safe and healthy during your trip.

  • Stay alert to changing weather conditions and adjust your plans if conditions become unsafe.
  • Prepare for activities by wearing the right clothes and packing protective items, such as bug spray, sunscreen, and a basic first aid kit.
  • Consider learning basic first aid and CPR before travel. Bring a travel health kit with items appropriate for your activities.
  • If you are outside for many hours in heat, eat salty snacks and drink water to stay hydrated and replace salt lost through sweating.
  • Protect yourself from UV radiation : use sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15, wear protective clothing, and seek shade during the hottest time of day (10 a.m.–4 p.m.).
  • Be especially careful during summer months and at high elevation. Because sunlight reflects off snow, sand, and water, sun exposure may be increased during activities like skiing, swimming, and sailing.
  • Very cold temperatures can be dangerous. Dress in layers and cover heads, hands, and feet properly if you are visiting a cold location.

Stay safe around water

  • Swim only in designated swimming areas. Obey lifeguards and warning flags on beaches.
  • Practice safe boating—follow all boating safety laws, do not drink alcohol if driving a boat, and always wear a life jacket.
  • Do not dive into shallow water.
  • Do not swim in freshwater in developing areas or where sanitation is poor.
  • Avoid swallowing water when swimming. Untreated water can carry germs that make you sick.
  • To prevent infections, wear shoes on beaches where there may be animal waste.

Leptospirosis, a bacterial infection that can be spread in fresh water, is found in Mexico. Avoid swimming in fresh, unchlorinated water, such as lakes, ponds, or rivers.

Keep away from animals

Most animals avoid people, but they may attack if they feel threatened, are protecting their young or territory, or if they are injured or ill. Animal bites and scratches can lead to serious diseases such as rabies.

Follow these tips to protect yourself:

  • Do not touch or feed any animals you do not know.
  • Do not allow animals to lick open wounds, and do not get animal saliva in your eyes or mouth.
  • Avoid rodents and their urine and feces.
  • Traveling pets should be supervised closely and not allowed to come in contact with local animals.
  • If you wake in a room with a bat, seek medical care immediately. Bat bites may be hard to see.

All animals can pose a threat, but be extra careful around dogs, bats, monkeys, sea animals such as jellyfish, and snakes. If you are bitten or scratched by an animal, immediately:

  • Wash the wound with soap and clean water.
  • Go to a doctor right away.
  • Tell your doctor about your injury when you get back to the United States.

Consider buying medical evacuation insurance. Rabies is a deadly disease that must be treated quickly, and treatment may not be available in some countries.

Reduce your exposure to germs

Follow these tips to avoid getting sick or spreading illness to others while traveling:

  • Wash your hands often, especially before eating.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, clean hands with hand sanitizer (containing at least 60% alcohol).
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Try to avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home or in your hotel room, unless you need medical care.

Avoid sharing body fluids

Diseases can be spread through body fluids, such as saliva, blood, vomit, and semen.

Protect yourself:

  • Use latex condoms correctly.
  • Do not inject drugs.
  • Limit alcohol consumption. People take more risks when intoxicated.
  • Do not share needles or any devices that can break the skin. That includes needles for tattoos, piercings, and acupuncture.
  • If you receive medical or dental care, make sure the equipment is disinfected or sanitized.

Know how to get medical care while traveling

Plan for how you will get health care during your trip, should the need arise:

  • Carry a list of local doctors and hospitals at your destination.
  • Review your health insurance plan to determine what medical services it would cover during your trip. Consider purchasing travel health and medical evacuation insurance.
  • Carry a card that identifies, in the local language, your blood type, chronic conditions or serious allergies, and the generic names of any medications you take.
  • Some prescription drugs may be illegal in other countries. Call Mexico’s embassy to verify that all of your prescription(s) are legal to bring with you.
  • Bring all the medicines (including over-the-counter medicines) you think you might need during your trip, including extra in case of travel delays. Ask your doctor to help you get prescriptions filled early if you need to.

Many foreign hospitals and clinics are accredited by the Joint Commission International. A list of accredited facilities is available at their website ( www.jointcommissioninternational.org ).

In some countries, medicine (prescription and over-the-counter) may be substandard or counterfeit. Bring the medicines you will need from the United States to avoid having to buy them at your destination.

Malaria is a risk in some parts of Mexico. If you are going to a risk area, fill your malaria prescription before you leave, and take enough with you for the entire length of your trip. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking the pills; some need to be started before you leave.

Select safe transportation

Motor vehicle crashes are the #1 killer of healthy US citizens in foreign countries.

In many places cars, buses, large trucks, rickshaws, bikes, people on foot, and even animals share the same lanes of traffic, increasing the risk for crashes.

Be smart when you are traveling on foot.

  • Use sidewalks and marked crosswalks.
  • Pay attention to the traffic around you, especially in crowded areas.
  • Remember, people on foot do not always have the right of way in other countries.

Riding/Driving

Choose a safe vehicle.

  • Choose official taxis or public transportation, such as trains and buses.
  • Ride only in cars that have seatbelts.
  • Avoid overcrowded, overloaded, top-heavy buses and minivans.
  • Avoid riding on motorcycles or motorbikes, especially motorbike taxis. (Many crashes are caused by inexperienced motorbike drivers.)
  • Choose newer vehicles—they may have more safety features, such as airbags, and be more reliable.
  • Choose larger vehicles, which may provide more protection in crashes.

Think about the driver.

  • Do not drive after drinking alcohol or ride with someone who has been drinking.
  • Consider hiring a licensed, trained driver familiar with the area.
  • Arrange payment before departing.

Follow basic safety tips.

  • Wear a seatbelt at all times.
  • Sit in the back seat of cars and taxis.
  • When on motorbikes or bicycles, always wear a helmet. (Bring a helmet from home, if needed.)
  • Avoid driving at night; street lighting in certain parts of Mexico may be poor.
  • Do not use a cell phone or text while driving (illegal in many countries).
  • Travel during daylight hours only, especially in rural areas.
  • If you choose to drive a vehicle in Mexico, learn the local traffic laws and have the proper paperwork.
  • Get any driving permits and insurance you may need. Get an International Driving Permit (IDP). Carry the IDP and a US-issued driver's license at all times.
  • Check with your auto insurance policy's international coverage, and get more coverage if needed. Make sure you have liability insurance.
  • Avoid using local, unscheduled aircraft.
  • If possible, fly on larger planes (more than 30 seats); larger airplanes are more likely to have regular safety inspections.
  • Try to schedule flights during daylight hours and in good weather.

Medical Evacuation Insurance

If you are seriously injured, emergency care may not be available or may not meet US standards. Trauma care centers are uncommon outside urban areas. Having medical evacuation insurance can be helpful for these reasons.

Helpful Resources

Road Safety Overseas (Information from the US Department of State): Includes tips on driving in other countries, International Driving Permits, auto insurance, and other resources.

The Association for International Road Travel has country-specific Road Travel Reports available for most countries for a minimal fee.

For information traffic safety and road conditions in Mexico, see Travel and Transportation on US Department of State's country-specific information for Mexico .

Maintain personal security

Use the same common sense traveling overseas that you would at home, and always stay alert and aware of your surroundings.

Before you leave

  • Research your destination(s), including local laws, customs, and culture.
  • Monitor travel advisories and alerts and read travel tips from the US Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) .
  • Leave a copy of your itinerary, contact information, credit cards, and passport with someone at home.
  • Pack as light as possible, and leave at home any item you could not replace.

While at your destination(s)

  • Carry contact information for the nearest US embassy or consulate .
  • Carry a photocopy of your passport and entry stamp; leave the actual passport securely in your hotel.
  • Follow all local laws and social customs.
  • Do not wear expensive clothing or jewelry.
  • Always keep hotel doors locked, and store valuables in secure areas.
  • If possible, choose hotel rooms between the 2nd and 6th floors.

To call for emergency services while in Mexico, dial 066, 060, or 080. Write these numbers down to carry with you during your trip.

Learn as much as you can about Mexico before you travel there. A good place to start is the country-specific information on Mexico from the US Department of State.

Americans in Mexico have been arrested for purchasing souvenirs that were, or looked like, antiques and that local customs authorities believed were national treasures. Familiarize yourself with any local regulations for antiques and follow these tips:

  • When you are considering purchasing an authentic antique or a reproduction, ask if you are allowed to export these items before you purchase them.
  • If you buy a reproduction, document on the customs form that it is a reproduction.
  • If you buy an authentic antique, obtain the necessary export permit (often from the national museum).

Healthy Travel Packing List

Use the Healthy Travel Packing List for Mexico for a list of health-related items to consider packing for your trip. Talk to your doctor about which items are most important for you.

Why does CDC recommend packing these health-related items?

It’s best to be prepared to prevent and treat common illnesses and injuries. Some supplies and medicines may be difficult to find at your destination, may have different names, or may have different ingredients than what you normally use.

If you are not feeling well after your trip, you may need to see a doctor. If you need help finding a travel medicine specialist, see Find a Clinic . Be sure to tell your doctor about your travel, including where you went and what you did on your trip. Also tell your doctor if you were bitten or scratched by an animal while traveling.

If your doctor prescribed antimalarial medicine for your trip, keep taking the rest of your pills after you return home. If you stop taking your medicine too soon, you could still get sick.

Malaria is always a serious disease and may be a deadly illness. If you become ill with a fever either while traveling in a malaria-risk area or after you return home (for up to 1 year), you should seek immediate medical attention and should tell the doctor about your travel history.

For more information on what to do if you are sick after your trip, see Getting Sick after Travel .

Map Disclaimer - The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on maps do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Approximate border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement are generally marked.

Other Destinations

If you need help finding travel information:

Message & data rates may apply. CDC Privacy Policy

File Formats Help:

  • Adobe PDF file
  • Microsoft PowerPoint file
  • Microsoft Word file
  • Microsoft Excel file
  • Audio/Video file
  • Apple Quicktime file
  • RealPlayer file
  • Zip Archive file

Exit Notification / Disclaimer Policy

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website.
  • Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website.
  • You will be subject to the destination website's privacy policy when you follow the link.
  • CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on other federal or private website.

Hundreds of Canadians stranded for days in Mexico after Sunwing cancellations

Passengers have been shuffled between hotels in cancun, paying for cabs themselves.

Passengers are seen as they await transport at the airport in Cancun, Mexico on Christmas Day.

Social Sharing

Hundreds of Canadians stranded in Cancun, Mexico, after their Sunwing flights were cancelled last week are still trying to find out how they'll get home.

Passengers said they've been shuffled from hotel to hotel after sleeping on floors at the airport and in lobbies with no end in sight to their ordeal.

"We just want to go home," said Tess Friedenberger, who was scheduled to fly home to Calgary on Dec. 22 aboard a Sunwing flight from Mexico.

"I never expected us to be in a situation like this. I never thought that it would even be possible. We're writing to the consulate, we're writing to hire lawyers, we're ready to do whatever it takes."

Friedenberger said in an interview the information from Sunwing has been inadequate and inaccurate, and many of her fellow travellers are angry and beginning to feel desperate. Video shot by a stranded Sunwing passenger and viewed by The Canadian Press shows dozens of people in the Cancun Airport chanting "Liars!" and "Get us home!"

"There is no help and there's no one who we can really trust at this point," she said. "We're pretty much fending for ourselves."

Due to severe winter weather across Canada, which has limited our ability to move planes and crew to other airports, a number of Sunwing flights continue to experience delays. Our teams are working hard to reaccommodate customers locally and in destination. — @SunwingVacay

Friedenberger left Calgary on Dec. 15 for Cancun. She was supposed to return home a week later, but got a notification saying the flight was delayed. Over the next few days, the notifications kept coming, pushing the flight later into the week.

Finally, she and her companion were told their flight would leave on Christmas Eve, she said. But when the time came, she said, a Sunwing representative said the flight didn't exist.

They haven't heard anything since about when they might get home, she said.

People sleeping in hotel lobby

In the meantime, she and her fellow passengers have been shuffled by Sunwing between hotels in Cancun, paying for cabs themselves to get there, she said. The second hotel they arrived at didn't know they were coming and had no rooms booked for them, she said. People slept in the hotel lobby until finally they were given a bed.

"There were elderly people who needed medication," she said. "There were children all over the lobby, screaming, crying and trying to sleep."

SUNWING WEBSITE HAS FINALLY UPDATED WITH A FLIGHT WG596 - OUR REP ON LAND SAID NOTHING OF THIS FLIGHT - SHE IS TELLING US TOMORROW (MONDAY) AT 515PM! WHERE IS THE DISCONNECT? WHO DO WE TRUST? <a href="https://twitter.com/SunwingVacay?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@SunwingVacay</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/CTVNews?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@CTVNews</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/AirPassRightsCA?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@AirPassRightsCA</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/ABDanielleSmith?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@ABDanielleSmith</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/globalnews?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@globalnews</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/Transport_gc?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Transport_gc</a> <a href="https://t.co/pioTRvoPmv">pic.twitter.com/pioTRvoPmv</a> &mdash; @tweedleteeee

When Sunwing directed them to another location on Christmas Eve, some were so distrustful they stayed behind to sleep in the lobby again until they had proof a room was waiting for them, she added.

Sunwing said in tweets on Dec. 22, 23 and 24 that it had cancelled flights because of the severe wintry weather conditions in various parts of the country. Friedenberger said she understands that bad weather can wreak havoc, noting: "We're Canadians."

"It's the lack of communication and the not knowing what's going to happen and the bouncing around," she explained. "If you know we're not going to get home until Dec. 28, that's fine. Tell us that, and put us up in a room at one hotel."

Friedenberger said she's encountered other Canadians stranded in Cancun by other Sunwing flights, and she said they're coping with the same unknowns.

"There's plenty more than just us," she said. "I would say hundreds at this point."

Cristina Oppedisano said her Sunwing flight home from Cancun to Toronto on Dec. 21 was also cancelled. Like Friedenberger, Oppedisano said in an interview that she and her family don't know when they'll get home.

'We're trapped here'

She said she and her group of 10 family members, which includes four children, have also been sent from one unprepared hotel to another, sleeping on airport and lobby floors all the while. She and her family are part of a group of about 100 passengers who were scheduled to be on the cancelled Sunwing flight, she said.

"We're trapped here," she said, adding that she, too, has not received any word from Sunwing on when they might get home.

In a statement emailed Sunday afternoon to The Canadian Press and, later, In a statement sent to CBC on Monday, Sunwing said "a number of northbound flights" continue to face delays as severe weather hampers its ability to move planes and crews to other airports.

The company did not say how many flights were affected.

The statement sent to CBC News said customers whose southbound departure flights were cancelled due to the weather will receive a full refund.

"For impacted customers with flight delays of 24 hours or more and scheduled travel up to and including Dec. 30, they have the option to cancel their flight or vacation and receive a full refund to the original form of payment," the statement said.

  • Travellers stranded as more than a dozen Via trains between Windsor and Quebec City cancelled or immobilized

"Our teams are working hard to re-accommodate customers by sub-servicing aircraft where possible, in addition to arranging alternate hotels and transfers for those with overnight delays," the airline's statement sent to CP says, adding that customers should keep checking their flight status online.

"Our teams locally and in destination continue to proactively manage the situation, and are doing everything possible to return customers home in the coming days."

Sunwing did not immediately respond to a followup email asking when those stranded in Cancun might get home.

Related Stories

  • Get informed on the top stories of the day in one quick scan
  • Days after she called for help, girl's body found in car in Gaza City, relatives say
  • 'One is too high': Manitoba, school divisions trying to track hundreds of unaccounted-for students
  • Human trafficking victim says he was forced to target Canadians in crypto investment scam
  • Tour Operators
  • Destinations
  • Hotels & Resorts
  • Agent Feedback
  • Deals & Incentives
  • On Location
  • Industry Experts
  • Sphere – HomeBased
  • Digital Editions
  • Subscribe today!

sunwing travel advisory mexico

  • Hotels and Resorts
  • Types of Travel
  • Subscribe Now

sunwing travel advisory mexico

Air Canada, Air Transat, Sunwing have updated information in wake of advisory

Post date: Mar 16 2020

Date: Mar 16 2020

By: Travelweek Group

TORONTO — It was a gruelling weekend for travel agents and suppliers. A number of airlines and tour operators have updates in the wake of the federal government’s global travel advisory, announced Friday, warning Canadians to avoid all non-essential travel outside of Canada, a warning that set off an unprecedented wave of rebookings and cancellations.

Sunwing notes that the federal government has given assurances that flights arriving back to Canada from sun destinations including those in the Caribbean and Mexico will operate as scheduled and will be able to land at the airports they were supposed to arrive at. The government had said on Friday that flights returning from Canada from international destinations would only be permitted to land at a handful of airports to allow for more coronavirus screening.

Looking ahead to spring, airlines including Air Canada and Air Transat have announced suspended routes to Europe and beyond. Several of Air Canada’s Europe routes have been either delayed or suspended entirely for the summer.

Other Air Canada routes both to the U.S. and destinations worldwide are also temporarily suspended.

Air Canada says it will continue to monitor the evolving situation closely in consultation with the Public Health Agency of Canada, Transport Canada and Global Affairs and will update its schedule as needed.

Here’s the latest, with more updates posted as soon as they are available:

U.S.& CANADA

Toronto-Abbotsford – Full summer suspension

Toronto-San Jose – New route launch postponed until June 1

Toronto-Portland – Seasonal startup delayed until June 30

Montreal-Seattle – New route launch postponed until June 1

EUROPE & MIDDLE EAST

Toronto-Copenhagen – Temporary suspension March 17 – April 30

Toronto-Dubai – Temporary suspension March 29 – April 24

Toronto-Madrid – Temporary suspension March 18 – May 1

Toronto-Budapest – Seasonal startup delayed until May 2

Montreal/Toronto-Barcelona – Seasonal startup delayed until May 1

Montreal-Athens – Seasonal startup delayed until April 10

Toronto-Athens – Seasonal startup delayed until April 9

Toronto-Israel – Temporary suspension March 18 – March 30Toronto-Milan – Seasonal startup delayed until June 4

Toronto-Rome – Temporary suspension March 10 – April 30

Montreal-Venice – Full summer suspension

Montreal-Marseille – Full summer suspension

Montreal-Bordeaux  – Full summer suspension

Toronto-Brussels – New route launch postponed to June 3

Ottawa-London (LHR) – Temporary suspension April 7 – 30

All routes to the People’s Republic of China – Suspension extended to April 30

Toronto-Hong Kong – Suspension extended to May 31

Toronto-Seoul (Incheon) – Suspension extended May 31. Last flight from Toronto departs March 21

Calgary-Tokyo (Narita) – Seasonal startup delayed until June 30

SOUTH AMERICA

Montreal-Lima – Earlier route cancellation, last flight April 30

AIR TRANSAT

With Air Transat’s cancellations on its temporarily suspended routes, in some cases it may be possible to re-route passengers on another Air Transat flight. In cases where it isn’t possible to re-route, Air Transat says the total amount of the client’s reservation will be credited to their file for future travel within one year of the original initial travel date. ( More Transat flight information can also be found in this March 17 post )

Montreal-Rome, TS302 – Temporary suspension April 10 – 24

Montreal-Rome, TS402 – Temporary suspension April 23 and April 30

Toronto-Rome, TS386 – Temporary suspension April 10 – 24

Vancouver-London, TS576 – Temporary suspension April 10 – 24

Vancouver-London, TS752 – Temporary suspension April 12 – 26

Vancouver-London, TS274 – Temporary suspension April 15 – 29

London-Vancouver, TS577 – Temporary suspension April 11 – 25

London-Vancouver, TS757 – Temporary suspension April 13 – 27

London-Vancouver, TS275 – Temporary suspension April 16 – 30

Rome-Toronto, TS387 – Temporary suspension April 11 – 25

Rome-Montreal, TS303 – Temporary suspension April 11 – 25

Sunwing says the federal government has given assurances that flights arriving to Canada from sun destinations including those in the Caribbean and Mexico can continue to operate as scheduled and will be able to land at the airports they were supposed to arrive at.

Sunwing says passengers who wish to return home early can seek out the services of a Sunwing Experiences rep in destination and/or by phone. Flight changes in these cases can be made free of charge and flights are subject to availability. Passengers who choose to return home early will forfeit the unused portion of their vacation.

With Sunwing’s change policy, customers with a departure date March 14 – April 14 who booked their vacation before March 4, 2020 and did not purchase travel insurance or a Sunwing Worry Free Cancellation Waiver can cancel and receive a future travel voucher in the value of the original package price paid. All cancellations are subject to a $100 admin fee per person, collected at time of cancellation. The future travel voucher can be redeemed against future travel for departures up to and including March 31, 2021. For bookings with departure dates from May 1 onwards, the company’s standard terms and conditions apply to changes and cancellations.

For new bookings made March 4 – 13, Sunwing will waive any admin fees associated with the first change to the booking. New travel dates must be given at the time of making this first change. This applies to bookings with a departure date up to and including June 24. Any change must be requested at least seven days prior to travel or normal conditions will apply.

For new bookings made March 14 – 31, Sunwing will allow customers to cancel their booking and receive a future travel voucher. A $100 change admin fee per person applies. Any difference in fare will also apply. This applies to all new bookings with a departure date from now up to and including June 24.

There are also options available for those who the Sunwing Worry Free Cancellation Waiver, and also options for those who purchased third-party travel insurance.

Full details are at Sunwing’s website. Also for the latest update from Sunwing see this March 17 post.

Travel Week Logo

Tags: Air Canada, Air Transat, Latest News, Sunwing

sunwing travel advisory mexico

  • Mexico Tourism
  • Mexico Hotels
  • Mexico Bed and Breakfast
  • Mexico Vacation Rentals
  • Flights to Mexico
  • Mexico Restaurants
  • Mexico Attractions
  • Mexico Travel Forum
  • Mexico Photos
  • All Mexico Hotels
  • Mexico Hotel Deals
  • Last Minute Hotels in Mexico
  • Things to Do
  • Restaurants
  • Vacation Rentals
  • Travel Stories
  • Rental Cars
  • Add a Place
  • Travel Forum
  • Travellers' Choice
  • Help Centre

Warning About All-Inclusive Through Sunwing - Mexico Forum

  • Mexico    

Warning About All-Inclusive Through Sunwing

  • Canada Forums
  • United States Forums
  • Europe Forums
  • Asia Forums
  • Central America Forums
  • Africa Forums
  • Caribbean Forums
  • Mexico Forums
  • South Pacific Forums
  • South America Forums
  • Middle East Forums
  • Honeymoons and Romance
  • Business Travel
  • Train Travel
  • Traveling With Disabilities
  • Tripadvisor Support
  • Solo Travel
  • Bargain Travel
  • Timeshares / Vacation Rentals
  • North America forums
  • Mexico forum

' class=

Double check your packages that advertise 8 nights as they're really 7 nights ... and you'll be sleeping in the lobby the night before departure.... check out:

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/sunwing-vacation-includes-sleepless-night-20110104-050649-936.html

This topic has been closed to new posts due to inactivity.

  • Travel in May 17:30
  • Anyone here flown Flair? Reviews are scary! 17:31
  • Has Uber changed 17:28
  • Low rise, smaller number of units condos? 17:27
  • Would like purchase medicine in cozumel 17:27
  • Eclipse weekend/Mazatlan taxi & transportation question 17:24
  • Planning trip for November…suggestions?! 17:22
  • Booking your room online or in person upon arrival 17:17
  • Best base to visit Olmec archaeology sites? 17:15
  • Hotel direct or 3rd party 17:13
  • Terminal of Euroairlines at Cancun Airport 17:08
  • Safe for families in December? 17:07
  • Current Taxi Fare? 17:07
  • Condo choices 17:06
  • tipping at an all-inclusive resort??? 14 replies
  • Best PARTY resorts?? 11 replies
  • Has anyone purchased a Grand Paradise Club memebership 38 replies
  • Dollars not accepted / currency changing? 3 replies
  • All Inclusive Resort near Mayan Ruins 2 replies
  • singles resorts.... any suggestions 2 replies
  • Mexico Travel Company 27 replies
  • Best All-Inclusive Resort that includes golf 2 replies
  • criminal record , flying non stop over US 4 replies
  • Where to go in January 4 replies

sunwing travel advisory mexico

Caution October 19, 2023

Worldwide caution, update january 10, 2024, information for u.s. citizens in the middle east.

  • Travel Advisories |
  • Contact Us |
  • MyTravelGov |

Find U.S. Embassies & Consulates

Travel.state.gov, congressional liaison, special issuance agency, u.s. passports, international travel, intercountry adoption, international parental child abduction, records and authentications, popular links, travel advisories, mytravelgov, stay connected, legal resources, legal information, info for u.s. law enforcement, replace or certify documents.

Share this page:

Mexico Travel Advisory

Travel advisory august 22, 2023, see state summaries.

Reissued after periodic review with general security updates, and the removal of obsolete COVID-19 page links.

Country Summary: Violent crime – such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery – is widespread and common in Mexico. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico, as travel by U.S. government employees to certain areas is prohibited or restricted. In many states, local emergency services are limited outside the state capital or major cities.

U.S. citizens are advised to adhere to restrictions on U.S. government employee travel. State-specific restrictions are included in the individual state advisories below. U.S. government employees may not travel between cities after dark, may not hail taxis on the street, and must rely on dispatched vehicles, including app-based services like Uber, and regulated taxi stands. U.S. government employees should avoid traveling alone, especially in remote areas. U.S. government employees may not drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico, except daytime travel within Baja California and between Nogales and Hermosillo on Mexican Federal Highway 15D, and between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey on Highway 85D.

Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to Mexico.

Do Not Travel To:

  • Colima state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Guerrero state  due to  crime .
  • Michoacan state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Sinaloa state due to  crime  and  kidnapping
  • Tamaulipas state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping.
  • Zacatecas  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Baja California  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Chihuahua state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Durango state  due to  crime .
  • Guanajuato state  due to  crime and kidnapping .
  • Jalisco state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Morelos state  due to  crime .
  • Sonora state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .

Exercise Increased Caution When Traveling To:

  • Aguascalientes  state due to  crime .
  • Baja California Sur state  due to  crime .
  • Chiapas state  due to  crime .
  • Coahuila state  due to  crime .
  • Hidalgo state  due to  crime .
  • Mexico City  due to  crime .
  • Mexico State  due to  crime .
  • Nayarit state  due to  crime.
  • Nuevo Leon  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Oaxaca state  due to  crime .
  • Puebla state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Queretaro state  due to  crime .
  • Quintana Roo state  due to  crime .
  • San Luis Potosi state  due to  crime and kidnapping .
  • Tabasco state  due to  crime .
  • Tlaxcala state due to  crime .
  • Veracruz state  due to  crime .

Exercise Normal Precautions When Traveling To:

  • Campeche state
  • Yucatan state

Visit our website for  Travel to High-Risk Areas .

If you decide to travel to Mexico:

  • Keep traveling companions and family back home informed of your travel plans. If separating from your travel group, send a friend your GPS location. If taking a taxi alone, take a photo of the taxi number and/or license plate and text it to a friend.
  • Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving alone or at night. In many states, police presence and emergency services are extremely limited outside the state capital or major cities.
  • Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Follow the U.S. Embassy on Facebook and Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for Mexico.
  • Mariners planning travel to Mexico should check for U.S. maritime  advisories  and  alerts , which include instructions on reporting suspicious activities and attacks to Mexican naval authorities.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest travel health information related to your travel. 

Aguascalientes state – Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Aguascalientes state.

Baja California state – Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime and kidnapping.

Transnational criminal organizations compete in the border area to establish narco-trafficking and human smuggling routes. Violent crime and gang activity are common. Travelers should remain on main highways and avoid remote locations. Of particular concern is the high number of homicides in the non-tourist areas of Tijuana. Most homicides appeared to be targeted; however, criminal organization assassinations and territorial disputes can result in bystanders being injured or killed. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

U.S. government employees must adhere to the noted restrictions:

  • Mexicali Valley:  U.S. government employees should avoid the Mexicali Valley due to the heightened possibility of violence between rival cartel factions.  The boundaries of the restricted area are: to the east, the Baja California/Arizona and Baja California/Sonora borders; to the south, from La Ventana (on Highway 5) due east to the Colorado River; to the west, Highway 5; and to the north, Boulevard Lazaro Cardenas/Highway 92/Highway 1 to Carretera Aeropuerto, from the intersection of Highway 1 and Carretera Aeropuerto due north to the Baja California/California border, and from that point eastward along the Baja California/California border.
  • Travelers may use Highways 2 and 2D to transit between Mexicali, Los Algodones, and San Luis Rio Colorado during daylight hours. Travelers may also use Highways 1 and 8 to transit to and from the Mexicali Airport during daylight hours.  Travel on Highway 5 is permissible during daylight hours.

There are no other travel restrictions for U.S. government employees in Baja California state. These include high-traffic tourism areas of border and coastal communities, such as  Tijuana ,  Ensenada , and  Rosarito .

Baja California Sur state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Baja California Sur state.

Campeche state – Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Campeche state.

Chiapas state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Chiapas state.

Chihuahua state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common. Most homicides are targeted assassinations against members of criminal organizations. Battles for territory between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens and U.S. government employees, including restaurants and malls during daylight hours. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

U.S. government employee travel is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Ciudad Juarez:  U.S. government employees may travel to the area of Ciudad Juarez bounded to the east by Bulevar Independencia; to the south by De los Montes Urales/Avenida Manuel J Clouthier/Carretera de Juárez; to the west by Via Juan Gabriel/Avenida de los Insurgentes/Calle Miguel Ahumada/Francisco Javier Mina/Melchor Ocampo; and to the north by the U.S.-Mexico border.  Direct travel to the Ciudad Juarez airport (officially called the Abraham González International Airport) and the factories located along Bulevar Independencia and Las Torres is permitted.  Travel to San Jerónimo is permitted only through the United States via the Santa Teresa U.S. Port of Entry; travel via Anapra is prohibited.

U.S. government employees may only travel from Ciudad Juarez to the city of Chihuahua during daylight hours via Federal Highway 45, with stops permitted only at the Guardia Nacional División Caminos station, the Umbral del Milenio overlook area, the border inspection station at KM 35, and the shops and restaurants on Federal Highway 45 in the city of Ahumada.

  • U.S. government employees may travel between Ciudad Juarez and Ascension via Highway 2.
  • Nuevo Casas Grandes Area (including Nuevo Casas Grandes, Casas Grandes, Mata Ortiz, Colonia Juárez, Colonia LeBaron, Paquimé and San Buenaventura):  U.S. government employees may travel to the Nuevo Casas Grandes area during daylight hours via Mexico Federal Highway 2, and subsequently Federal Highway 10, to Nuevo Casas Grandes.  Employees are permitted to stay overnight in the cities of Nuevo Casas Grandes and Casas Grandes only.
  • City of Chihuahua:  U.S. government employees may travel at any time to the area of the city of Chihuahua bounded to the north by Avenida Transformación; to the east by Avenida Tecnológico/Manuel Gómez Morín/Highway 16/Blvd.José Fuentes Mares; to the west by the city boundary; and to the south by Periférico Francisco R. Almada.
  • U.S. government employees may travel on Highways 45, 16, and 45D through the city of Chihuahua and to the Chihuahua airport (officially called the General Roberto Fierro Villalobos International Airport). 
  • U.S. government employees may travel to Santa Eulalia to the east of the city of Chihuahua, as well as to Juan Aldama via Highway 16 to the northeast.
  • U.S. government employees may travel south of the city of Chihuahua on Highway 45 to the southern boundary of Parral, including each town directly connected to Highway 45, including Lázaro Cárdenas, Pedro Meoqui, Santa Cruz de Rosales, Delicias, Camargo, Ciudad Jiménez, and Parral itself.
  • U.S. government employees may only travel on official business from the city of Chihuahua on Highway 16 to Ciudad Cuauhtémoc bounded by Highway 21 to the north and east, Highway 5 to the west, and Bulevar Jorge Castillo Cabrera to the south. 
  • Ojinaga:  U.S. government employees must travel to Ojinaga via U.S. Highway 67 and enter through the U.S. Port of Entry in Presidio, Texas.
  • Palomas:  U.S. government employees may travel to Palomas via U.S. highways through the U.S. Port of Entry in Columbus, New Mexico, or via Highway 2 in Mexico.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Chihuahua, including  Copper Canyon .

Coahuila state – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime and gang activity occur in parts of Coahuila state. 

U.S. government employees must adhere to the following travel restrictions:

  • Zaragoza, Morelos, Allende, Nava, Jimenez, Villa Union, Guerrero, and Hidalgo municipalities : U.S. government employees may not travel to these municipalities.
  • Piedras Negras and Ciudad Acuña:  U.S. government employees must travel directly from the United States and observe a curfew from midnight to 6:00 a.m. in both cities.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Coahuila state.

Colima state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime and kidnapping.  

Violent crime and gang activity are widespread. Most homicides are targeted assassinations against members of criminal organizations. Shooting incidents between criminal groups have injured or killed bystanders. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.  

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with noted restrictions: 

  • Manzanillo:   U.S. government employee travel is limited to the tourist and port areas of Manzanillo.  
  • Employees traveling to Manzanillo from Guadalajara must use Federal Toll Road 54D during daylight hours.  

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Colima state. 

Durango state – Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Durango state.

  • West and south of Federal Highway 45:  U.S. government employees may not travel to this region of Durango state.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Durango state.

Guanajuato state – Reconsider Travel

Gang violence, often associated with the theft of petroleum and natural gas from the state oil company and other suppliers, occurs in Guanajuato, primarily in the south and central areas of the state.  Of particular concern is the high number of murders in the southern region of the state associated with cartel-related violence. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Areas south of Federal Highway 45D:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area south of and including Federal Highway 45D, Celaya, Salamanca, and Irapuato.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Guanajuato state, which includes tourist areas in:  San Miguel de Allende ,  Guanajuato City , and  surrounding areas.

Guerrero state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime.

Crime and violence are widespread. Armed groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and may use violence towards travelers. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping in previous years.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following area with the noted restrictions:

  • Taxco:  U.S. government employees must use Federal Highway 95D, which passes through Cuernavaca, Morelos, and stay within downtown tourist areas of Taxco. Employees may visit Grutas de Cacahuamilpa National Park during the day with a licensed tour operator.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of the state of Guerrero, including to tourist areas in  Acapulco ,  Zihuatanejo , and  Ixtapa .

Hidalgo state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Hidalgo state.

Jalisco state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Jalisco state. In Guadalajara, territorial battles between criminal groups take place in tourist areas. Shooting incidents between criminal groups have injured or killed innocent bystanders. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Jalisco-Michoacan border and Federal Highway 110:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area between Federal Highway 110 and the Jalisco-Michoacan border, nor travel on Federal Highway 110 between Tuxpan, Jalisco, and the Michoacan border.
  • Federal Highway 80:  U.S. government employees may not travel on Federal Highway 80 south of Cocula.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S government employees in Jalisco state which includes tourist areas in:  Guadalajara Metropolitan Area ,  Puerto Vallarta (including neighboring Riviera Nayarit) ,  Chapala , and  Ajijic .

Mexico City (Ciudad de Mexico) – Exercise Increased Caution

Both violent and non-violent crime occur throughout Mexico City. Use additional caution, particularly at night, outside of the frequented tourist areas where police and security patrol more routinely. Petty crime occurs frequently in both tourist and non-tourist areas.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Mexico City.

Mexico State (Estado de Mexico) – Exercise Increased Caution

Both violent and non-violent crime occur throughout Mexico State. Use additional caution in areas outside of the frequented tourist areas, although petty crime occurs frequently in tourist areas as well.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Mexico State.

Michoacan state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime and kidnapping.

Crime and violence are widespread in Michoacan state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Federal Highway 15D:   U.S. government employees may travel on Federal Highway 15D to transit the state between Mexico City and Guadalajara.
  • Morelia:  U.S. government employees may travel by air and by land using Federal Highways 43 or 48D from Federal Highway 15D.
  • Lazaro Cardenas:  U.S. government employees must travel by air only and limit activities to the city center or port areas.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of the state of Michoacan, including the portions of the  Monarch Butterfly Reserve  located in Michoacan.

Morelos state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Morelos state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Morelos state.

Nayarit state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout Nayarit state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S government employees in Nayarit state.

Nuevo Leon state – Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime and kidnapping.

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Nuevo Leon state.

Oaxaca state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence occur throughout the state.

U.S. travelers are reminded that U.S. government employees must adhere to the following travel restrictions:

  • Isthmus region:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area of Oaxaca bounded by Federal Highway 185D to the west, Federal Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca-Chiapas border to the east.  This includes the cities of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas Atempa.  
  • Federal Highway 200 northwest of Pinotepa:  U.S. government employees may not use Federal Highway 200 between Pinotepa and the Oaxaca-Guerrero border.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees to other parts of Oaxaca state, which include tourist areas in:  Oaxaca City ,  Monte Alban ,  Puerto Escondido,  and  Huatulco .

Puebla state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Puebla state.

Queretaro state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Queretaro state.

Quintana Roo state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur in any location, at any time, including in popular tourist destinations.  Travelers should maintain a high level of situational awareness, avoid areas where illicit activities occur, and promptly depart from potentially dangerous situations. 

While not directed at tourists, shootings between rival gangs have injured innocent bystanders.  Additionally, U.S. citizens have been the victims of both non-violent and violent crimes in tourist and non-tourist areas.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Quintana Roo state. However, personnel are advised to exercise increased situational awareness after dark in downtown areas of Cancun, Tulum, and Playa del Carmen, and to remain in well-lit pedestrian streets and tourist zones.

San Luis Potosi state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state.  U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in San Luis Potosi state.

Sinaloa state – Do Not Travel

Violent crime is widespread. Criminal organizations are based in and operating in Sinaloa. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Mazatlan:  U.S. government employees may travel to Mazatlan by air or sea only, are limited to the Zona Dorada and historic town center, and must travel via direct routes between these destinations and the airport and sea terminal.
  • Los Mochis and Topolobampo:  U.S. government employees may travel to Los Mochis and Topolobampo by air or sea only, are restricted to the city and the port, and must travel via direct routes between these destinations and the airport.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Sinaloa state.

Sonora state – Reconsider Travel

Sonora is a key location used by the international drug trade and human trafficking networks. Violent crime is widespread. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping. Travelers should maintain a heightened level of awareness of their surroundings in all their travels in Sonora.  Security incidents may occur in any area of Sonora.

  • Travel between Hermosillo and Nogales:  U.S. government employees may travel between the U.S. Ports of Entry in Nogales and Hermosillo during daylight hours via Federal Highway 15 only. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures. Travelers should exercise caution and avoid unnecessary stops as security incidents, including sporadic, armed carjackings, and shootings have been reported along this highway during daylight hours. Travelers should have a full tank of gas and inform friends or family members of their planned travel.
  • Nogales:  U.S. government employees may not travel in the triangular area north of Avenida Tecnologico, west of Bulevar Luis Donaldo Colosio (Periferico), nor east of Federal Highway 15D (Corredor Fiscal). U.S. government employees also may not travel in the residential and business areas to east of the railroad tracks along Plutarco Elias Calle (HWY 15) and Calle Ruiz Cortino, including the business area around the Morley pedestrian gate port-of-entry. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in Nogales due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.  
  • Puerto Peñasco:  U.S. government employees may travel between Puerto Peñasco and the Lukeville-Sonoyta U.S. Port of Entry during daylight hours via Federal Highway 8 only. They may not travel on any other route to Puerto Peñasco. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in Puerto Peñasco. due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.
  • Triangular region near Mariposa U.S. Port of Entry:  U.S. government employees may not travel into or through the triangular region west of the Mariposa U.S. Port of Entry, east of Sonoyta, and north of Altar municipality.
  • San Luis Rio Colorado, Cananea, and Agua Prieta : U.S. government employees may travel directly from the nearest U.S. Port of Entry to San Luis Rio Colorado, Cananea (via Douglas Port of Entry), and Agua Prieta, but may not go beyond the city limits. Travel is limited to daylight hours only. Travel between Nogales and Cananea via Imuris is not permitted. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in these cities due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.
  • Eastern and southern Sonora (including San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas and Alamos):  U.S. government employees may not travel to areas of Sonora east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and State Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16. U.S. government employees may travel to San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas and Alamos; travel to Alamos is only permitted by air and within city limits.  U.S. government employees may not travel to areas of Sonora south of Federal Highway 16 and east of Federal Highway 15 (south of Hermosillo), as well as all points south of Guaymas, including Empalme, Guaymas, Obregon, and Navojoa.  U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in these areas due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.

U.S. government employees may travel to other parts of Sonora state in compliance with the above restrictions, including tourist areas in: Hermosillo , Bahia de Kino , and Puerto Penasco .

Tabasco state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Tabasco state.

Tamaulipas state – Do Not Travel

Organized crime activity – including gun battles, murder, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, forced disappearances, extortion, and sexual assault – is common along the northern border and in Ciudad Victoria. Criminal groups target public and private passenger buses, as well as private automobiles traveling through Tamaulipas, often taking passengers and demanding ransom payments.

Heavily armed members of criminal groups often patrol areas of the state and operate with impunity particularly along the border region from Reynosa to Nuevo Laredo.  In these areas, local law enforcement has limited capacity to respond to incidents of crime. Law enforcement capacity is greater in the tri-city area of Tampico, Ciudad Madero, and Altamira, which has a lower rate of violent criminal activity compared to the rest of the state.

U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Matamoros and Nuevo Laredo:  U.S. government employees may only travel within a limited radius around and between the U.S. Consulates in Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros, their homes, the respective U.S. Ports of Entry, and limited downtown sites, subject to an overnight curfew.
  • Overland travel in Tamaulipas:  U.S. government employees may not travel between cities in Tamaulipas using interior Mexican highways. Travel between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey is limited to Federal Highway 85D during daylight hours with prior authorization.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other parts of Tamaulipas state.

Tlaxcala state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Tlaxcala state.

Veracruz state – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime and gang activity occur with increasing frequency in Veracruz, particularly in the center and south near Cordoba and Coatzacoalcos. While most gang-related violence is targeted, violence perpetrated by criminal organizations can affect bystanders. Impromptu roadblocks requiring payment to pass are common.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Veracruz state.

Yucatan state – Exercise Normal Precautions

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Yucatan state, which include tourist areas in:  Chichen Itza ,  Merida ,  Uxmal , and  Valladolid .

Zacatecas state – Do Not Travel

Violent crime, extortion, and gang activity are widespread in Zacatecas state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Zacatecas City : U.S. government employee travel is limited to Zacatecas City proper, and employees may not travel overland to Zacatecas City.
  • U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Zacatecas state.

Travel Advisory Levels

Assistance for u.s. citizens, search for travel advisories, external link.

You are about to leave travel.state.gov for an external website that is not maintained by the U.S. Department of State.

Links to external websites are provided as a convenience and should not be construed as an endorsement by the U.S. Department of State of the views or products contained therein. If you wish to remain on travel.state.gov, click the "cancel" message.

You are about to visit:

Search Icon

  • Tour Operators
  • Destinations
  • Hotels & Resorts
  • Digital Edition Fall 2023
  • Travel Webcast
  • Suppliers Kit
  • Canadian Travel Press
  • Travel Courier
  • Offshore Travel Magazine

Facebook Icon

Sunwing Travel Group Expands Resorts In Mexico

May 13, 2022

sunwing travel advisory mexico

Sunwing Travel Group is gearing up for the opening of its newest all-inclusive resort in the Riviera Maya, Mexico – the Royalton Splash Riviera Cancun which is slated to open Dec. 20, 2022.

Samantha Taylor, Chief Marketing Officer at Sunwing, said that: “For 11 years and counting, Sunwing’s resort division has continued to expand its portfolio and meet our customers in some of the most beloved sun destinations in Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America.”

Taylor continued: “We’re thrilled for Sunwing customers to experience the new Royalton Splash Riviera Cancun, the first Royalton Splash in Mexico, and enjoy its luxury offerings and larger-than-life amenities, just in time for the 2022-2023 holiday season.”

Boasting more than 1,000 modern suites, guests familiar with Royalton’s All-In Luxury concept can also enjoy its privileges and host of in-room amenities at Royalton Splash Riviera Cancun, including the Royalton signature DreamBed with high-thread-count sheets, rain shower, 24-hour room service, in-suite Jacuzzi in select room categories and a well-stocked mini-bar.

Customers kicking off their winter vacations at this resort will adore its on-site water amenities and activities with four pools, a variety of beach and water sports and one of the Caribbean’s largest on-site water parks. Featuring 14 large water slides, two lazy rivers, kids pool and splash pad, kids and kids-at-heart can exercise their right to fun with unlimited access to one of the resort’s main attractions.

For a more elevated experience, Sunwing customers can upgrade their booking and stay in the resort’s exclusive Diamond Club section where they’ll receive dedicated butler services, a private oceanview lounge with premium drinks and canapés and an exclusive beach area, among other upscale amenities in designated suites.

Plus, vacationers can enjoy an array of entertainment facilities designed with both families and friend groups in mind. In addition to the brand’s Sports Event Guarantee where the big game is always on, guests are never short of fun with daily entertainment and nightly shows, two theatres, laser tag, bowling, a trampoline park, supervised programming for kids and teens and complimentary resort-wide Wi-Fi to capture every moment.

Should customers wish to enjoy a more relaxed setting, they can reserve a treatment at The Royal Spa or a private beachfront cabana or keep their heart rate up at the on-site fitness centre with the Royalton Fit program.

When it comes time to satiate their appetites, guests can sample one of 12 restaurants, nine bars and much more on-site with the added benefit of unlimited reservation-free dining, all set among astonishing views of the Caribbean Sea.

Go to www.sunwing.ca

sunwing travel advisory mexico

WestJet, Air Canada slice fares after Lynx Air announces shut down

Coconut Bay, ACV put the spotlight on Saint Lucia

Coconut Bay, ACV put the spotlight on Saint Lucia

  • Your Profile
  • Your Subscriptions
  • Your Business
  • Support Local News
  • Payment History
  • Sign up for Daily Headlines
  • Sign up for Notifications

Is it safe to visit Mexico? What Canadians need to know about the 2024 travel advisory

Elana Shepert

  • Share by Email
  • Share on Facebook
  • Share on LinkedIn
  • Share via Text Message

canada-mexico-travel-advisory-vancouver-flights-yvr-2024

The Mexico travel advisory has been updated several times over the past year and includes several warnings at the start of 2024.

The Canadian government continues to advise travellers to exercise a high degree of caution in the North American country. Additionally, there are several regions they should avoid all travel to. 

Mexico is the second-largest tourist destination for Canadians after the United States and travellers from Vancouver International Airport (YVR) can enjoy affordable flights to hot spots like Cancun throughout the year. However, violent crime and kidnapping have been rapidly increasing in the country over the past several years.

In November 2023, the United Nations stated that over 100,000 people are currently missing in Mexico , characterizing the mass disappearances as "alarming," according to Reuters.

What do I do if I get kidnapped?

Canada warns that Mexico has one of the highest kidnapping rates in the world; it is a "serious security risk" for people who travel to this country. Although many tourist areas are considered safe, this issue is widespread. 

Many contracted Canadians working for Mexican businesses have been kidnapped but "kidnappers target all classes." They often work in areas that aren't under the control of security forces or police.

If you're kidnapped:

  • comply with the kidnappers’ requests
  • don’t attempt to resist

A second kind of kidnapping, called express kidnapping, occurs in large urban areas. Criminals ask for a small and immediate ransom and often work with taxi drivers (or pose as them). They force victims to use their debit or credit card to withdraw money from ATMs in exchange for their release.

  • Use only a reputable taxi company or a trusted ride-sharing app
  • Book taxis through your hotel or an authorized taxi stand ( sitio )

Do not travel to the Guerrero State

Although Hurricane Otis made landfall in Mexico in October 2023, parts of the country are still grappling with damages left in its wake.

People should completely avoid travelling to the Guerrero State due to the precarious security situation. There continues to be a threat of "armed violence, banditry, and looting in cities and on roads."

 The cities of Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo and Taxco are excluded from the advisory.

Updated Mexico travel advisory for Canada in 2024

In 2022, Canada and its neighbours south of the border issued updated  advisories for parts of Mexico  due to violent crime, including homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery. 

There continue to be high rates of these types of crime in popular tourist destinations such as the Mayan Riviera (Cancún, Playa del Carmen, Puerto Morelos, and Tulum), and Acapulco. Criminal groups and drug cartels are also present in tourist areas and bystanders can get caught in crossfire. 

Disputes between taxi and ridesharing application drivers may occur in these popular tourist destinations. Drivers generally don't target tourists but you "be caught up in these incidents and harassed or injured."

In Mexico City, government-authorized taxis have licence plates starting with “A” or “B." Other taxis at stands will have both the logo of their company and the plate number stamped on the side of the car. Official taxis in Mexico City are pink and white. Users can validate the pink and white taxis on the CDMX app.

Buses are relatively safe in the capital city but you should use VIP or executive class transportation when travelling to other cities.

Penalties for breaking the law in Mexico can be more severe than in Canada, even for similar offences. Travellers can be held in pre-trial detention with lengthy delays before a trial.

"Many petty crimes (such as public urination, failure to pay a bill or disorderly behaviour) can result in a 72-hour detention by police. Paying a fine can secure an early release from detention."

Smoking is prohibited in all public places except for clearly marked designated smoking areas. Some of the places tourists can no longer smoke in include beaches, parks, hotels, and restaurants. If you are caught smoking in public, you may be fined.

Avoid non-essential travel to these areas in Mexico

The Canadian government warns against non-essential travel to the following areas due to high levels of violence of violence and organized crime.

  • all Chihuahua
  • all Colima, except the city of Manzanillo
  • all Coahuila, except the southern part of the state at and below the Saltillo-Torreón highway corridor
  • all Durango, except Durango City
  • Highway 45 between León and Irapuato
  • the area south of and including Highway 45D between Irapuato and Celaya
  • all Michoacán, except the city of Morelia
  • the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas
  • the municipality of Xoxocotla
  • the area within 20 km of the border with Sinaloa and Durango
  • the city of Tepic
  • all Nuevo León, except the city of Monterrey
  • all Sinaloa, except the city of Mazatlán
  • all Sonora, except the cities of Hermosillo and Guaymas/San Carlos and Puerto Peñasco
  • all Tamaulipas
  • all Zacatecas

What to do if you need help while you are in Mexico 

In case of an emergency in Mexico, dial 911. 

Contact roadside assistance if you run into an issue on a highway. The Angeles Verdes is a highway patrol service that provides free assistance on all major toll highways from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. local time. 

To contact the Angeles Verdes,  download their App  on your mobile device. In case of an emergency, you can also dial 078 or 800 006 8839 (toll-free in Mexico) to reach them.

Canadians in need of emergency consular assistance should contact Global Affairs Canada's Emergency Watch and Response Centre by calling 001-800-514-0129 (toll-free from Mexico only), +1 613 996 8885, by text message at +1 613-686-3658, via WhatsApp at +1 613-909-8881, via Telegram at Canada Emergency Abroad or by  e-mail . 

What to do before you leave on your trip to Mexico 

Visit a travel medical clinic before you book a ticket. The healthcare professionals will inform you about what vaccinations you require and what you can expect on your trip. There are risks of contracting several viruses spread by mosquitoes including dengue, Zika, and chikungunya.

Travellers should always check the latest advice from the government before they book a ticket from Vancouver to Mexico. They should also purchase a  comprehensive travel insurance policy  when they book their ticket, which will cover the cost of your ticket in case you can't leave due to an unforeseeable medical or other emergency reason. It will also cover incidents like missed connections, baggage interruption and loss, and more. 

Canadian travel advisories that have a "level three" or "level four" warning may be claimed under a trip cancellation and interruption plan. However, travellers can't claim insurance if they booked the flights or accommodation after the advisory was issued. 

You must fill out a tourist card to enter Mexico unless you plan to stay under 72 hours within the northern border zone. 

If you don’t obtain a tourist card upon arrival , you may face:

Canadians should always register trips that they take  online  before they leave so that the government can contact them in an emergency.

  • Oldest Newest

This has been shared 0 times

'Should be ashamed': Vancouverites react to Air Canada ranking worst airline for flight delays

Featured Flyer

sunwing travel advisory mexico

It looks like you are visiting us from the US. View our US site!

Account Profile

Extreme Adventure

alt

Thrill seekers, enjoy a series of adventures in the jungle on Mexico’s longest zipline, followed by an exciting waterslide and UTV off-road adventure.

• Soar above the jungle on one of Mexico’s longest ziplines • Jump into the river after an exhilarating water slide adventure • Admire stunning views of the Sierra Madre mountains on board an UTV

Embark on a series of adventures on land, air and sea in the depths of the jungle! Start on Mexico’s longest zipline and soar 60 metres (200 feet) above the riverscapes and along the massive treetops. Try to spot the diverse variety of wildlife and beautiful flora as you zip over 305 metres (1000 feet) across the jungle. After your aerial adventure, take a refreshing plunge into the river, after taking a thrilling slide down one of Mexico’s tallest water slides! After fun in the water, take in stunning views of Puerto Vallarta’s natural landscapes on board an UTV as you embark an off-road adventure along on the Sierra Madre mountains.

  • Non-alcoholic drinks
  • Snacks or box lunch
  • Safety equipment

Minimum age: 8 years old. Min. Height to participate: 4 ft. Max. Weight: 260 lbs. For safety reasons, pregnant women, people with back or neck, heart, balance or/and dizziness conditions are restricted. Cameras are not allowed. Drivers of the Polaris UTV vehicles must be at least 18 years, able to present a valid driver’s license and a credit card for insurance.

You may also like

Extreme Adventure

SUNWING APP -

 alt=

Switch currencies in the main menu: CAD, Euro, MXN or GBP

Nexus

  • español "> español
  • français "> français

sunwing travel advisory mexico

Destination / Hotel

Choose dates.

  • Left : previous day
  • Right : next day
  • Up : previous week
  • Down : next week
  • Page up : prev month
  • Page down : next month
  • Alt + Page up : prev year
  • Alt + Page down : next year
  • Home : today, or closest selectable date
  • Enter : select date
  • Escape : close calendar and return to the text input
  • Up or Down (while inside the text input): open calendar

sunwing travel advisory mexico

Stay connected ON THE GO!

Get your sim today, explore the most breathtaking destinations in the caribbean with nexustours.

Get ready to embark on the adventure of a lifetime with the top excursions! Explore breathtaking landscapes, witness incredible wildlife, and immerse yourself in local cultures. Whether you're looking for thrills and excitement, or a relaxing escape from the hustle and bustle of everyday life, you'll find it all on these unforgettable trips. Don't miss your chance to make memories that will last a lifetime - book your top excursion today!

sunwing travel advisory mexico

Riviera Maya

AQUATIC ADVENTURE

Isla Mujeres Full Experience

Venture to Isla Mujeres on a catamaran excursion to explore this beautiful island. As you sail from Cancun to Isla Mujeres, grab your favourite drink from the open bar on board and admire the beautiful coast passing you by.

sunwing travel advisory mexico

Flexible Cancellation

Platinum VIP Catamaran

You will escape to a world of relaxation, fun, and tropical paradise. Experience the Dominican culture through merengue lessons, beach volleyball, and more. As you embark on a comfortable catamaran from the dock, kicking off an exciting journey. Your first stop will be at a stunning natural pool lagoon known for its abundance of starfish.

Falmouth Mystic Lagoon

Cruise through the glowing waters of Luminous Lagoon, the largest of only four bioluminescent lagoons in the world, on this unique evening excursion. Surrounded by mangroves, this rare lagoon is home to millions of microscopic organisms that glow when the water is disturbed, giving the lagoon its mystical look.

Riviera maya

Tour Xcaret Plus

Xcaret will steal your heart. Mexico's ecological and archaeological park in the Riviera Maya is an adventure with over 40 attractions offering something for everyone in your group! Explore the clear waters of the underground lazy river tour. Snorkel in sparkling lagoons, float down Paradise River, or lounge on a sunny beach.

Punta Cana Buggies Double

Tour the beautiful countryside of Punta Cana on this off-road dune buggy adventure! Venture across exotic landscapes and through small villages on a dune buggy as you navigate narrow trails to your first stop of El Hoyo Cave. Swim through the cave’s underground river before getting back on your dune buggy and making your way to Macao Beach. Relax beneath the shade of a palm tree or swim through the crystal-clear waters off the shore before visiting Tours Point Ranch.

sunwing travel advisory mexico

Cool Running Cruise

The best experience in Ocho Rios is waiting for you on the Cool Runnings Cruise Jamaica! Journey along the island’s coastline on board a catamaran

Chichen Itza Tour

You’d be amazed at all the incredible things to do in Chichén Itzá ! Discover the magic of Chichén Itzá and the fascinating story of this ancient Mayan city abandoned in the 15th century, now a UNESCO World Heritage archaeological park.

Jamwest Super Deal

Take your vacation to new heights as you unleash the thrill of an exhilarating Jamaica ATV tour. Get ready for heart-pounding moments as you navigate expansive woodland and conquer a stunning beach trail, experiencing the coast of Negril in a new way.

With the Saona Catamaran Excursion, you will escape to a world of relaxation, fun, and tropical paradise. Experience the Dominican culture through merengue lessons, beach volleyball, and more. As you embark on a comfortable catamaran from the dock, kicking off an exciting journey. Your first stop will be at a stunning natural pool lagoon known for its abundance of starfish.

The most stunning Caribbean destinations with NexusTours!

Immerse yourself in the picturesque sights and sounds of Cancun, bask in the sun on Punta Cana's golden beaches, wander through the beauty of Aruba, soak in Jamaica's unparalleled culture, or explore the distinctive landscape of Costa Rica. Wherever you go, you'll discover the best of the Caribbean with nexustours. Plan the perfect getaway with a safe and comfortable airport transfer.

The best destinations

Immerse yourself in the stunning sights and sounds of Cancun, soak up the sun on the golden beaches of Punta Cana, and explore the beauty of Aruba.

Why book with nexustours ?

sunwing travel advisory mexico

Dedicated local & virtual customer service

sunwing travel advisory mexico

Largest product selection

sunwing travel advisory mexico

Great value for money

sunwing travel advisory mexico

Book now and pay later

IMAGES

  1. Stranded passengers have all been returned from Mexico, Sunwing says

    sunwing travel advisory mexico

  2. Sunwing travellers stranded in Mexico demand answers, compensation

    sunwing travel advisory mexico

  3. Travel PR News

    sunwing travel advisory mexico

  4. 411 travelbuys Blog: 411travelbuys.ca: Recreate Your Emotions at Mexico

    sunwing travel advisory mexico

  5. Inquiry launched into 29-hour Sunwing flight delay in Mexico

    sunwing travel advisory mexico

  6. A Big Mazatlan Welcome For Sunwing

    sunwing travel advisory mexico

COMMENTS

  1. Mexico Travel Advisory

    August 22, 2023 See State Summaries K C Reissued after periodic review with general security updates, and the removal of obsolete COVID-19 page links. Country Summary: Violent crime - such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery - is widespread and common in Mexico.

  2. Sunwing

    Sunwing

  3. Travel advice and advisories for Mexico

    Canada.ca Travel Destinations Mexico travel advice Exercise a high degree of caution (with regional advisories) Latest updates: The Need help? section was updated. Last updated: February 21, 2024 11:51 ET On this page Risk levels Safety and security Entry and exit requirements Health Laws and culture Natural disasters and climate Risk levels

  4. Sunwing Passengers Stranded In Mexico Because Of Cancellations

    According to a Sunwing Airlines travel advisory posted December 24, the following options exist for those with flight delays at or longer than 24 hours, as well as tickets for flights "up to and including December 30, 2022",

  5. Travel Advisory: Update for Mexico

    The Travel Advisory includes individual risk assessment levels for each state. Actions to Take: Read the Mexico Travel Advisory , including the detailed state summaries and advisory levels for information on your specific travel destination. Read the Mexico country information page . Assistance: Contact Form U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Mexico

  6. Mexico International Travel Information

    Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). See the State Department's travel website for the Worldwide Caution and Travel Advisories.

  7. Mexico Travel Guide

    Mexico Travel Guide | Sunwing.ca | Sunwing.ca Vacation Inspiration Mexico From the sparkling shores of Riviera Maya to the dramatic rocky archways of Los Cabos and the bustling nightlife of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico is packed with variety from coast-to-coast.

  8. Travel advice and advisories

    The Government of Canada's official source of travel information and advice, the Travel Advice and Advisories help you to make informed decisions and travel safely while you are outside Canada. Check the page for your destination often, because safety and security conditions may change. See Travel Advice and Advisories - FAQ for more information.

  9. Sunwing Airlines Reviews and Flights

    Mexico. Not bad for what you pay. Vancouver to Cancun, Feb 12 to 18, round trip. Our flight to Cancun was on time, no issue. ... We continuously aim to rise above and beyond our customers' travel expectations with Sunwing therefore, your feedback is greatly valued and will be shared among the applicable departments. Thank you, DZ | Social Media ...

  10. Mexico

    Dengue in the Americas February 09, 2024 Dengue is a risk in many parts of Central and South America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. Some countries are reporting increased numbers of cases of the disease. Travelers to the Americas can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites. Destination List: Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, French Guiana ...

  11. Hundreds of Canadians stranded for days in Mexico after Sunwing

    Hundreds of Canadians stranded in Cancun, Mexico, after their Sunwing flights were cancelled last week are still trying to find out how they'll get home. Passengers said they've been shuffled...

  12. Mazatlán Mexico All Inclusive Vacation Deals

    You'll travel through the Huana Coa Canopy Park on a refurbished army truck and enjoy the scenery on your way to an incredible 5,000-foot-long zipline course. Take in the incredible wildlife as you glide through the forest across nine panoramic platforms.

  13. Air Canada, Transat updated info in wake of advisory

    Sunwing notes that the federal government has given assurances that flights arriving back to Canada from sun destinations including those in the Caribbean and Mexico will operate as scheduled...

  14. Cancun Mexico All Inclusive Vacation Deals

    Wednesday, Visit the ancient Mayan city of Tulum and enjoy all inclusive access to Xel-Há Park on this exciting excursion. Start by visiting the ancient Mayan ruins of Tulum on a guided tour through this fascinating settlement.

  15. Warning About All-Inclusive Through Sunwing

    16 posts 38 reviews 65 helpful votes Warning About All-Inclusive Through Sunwing 13 years ago Save Double check your packages that advertise 8 nights as they're really 7 nights ... and you'll be sleeping in the lobby the night before departure.... check out: http://ca.news.yahoo.com/sunwing-vacation-includes-sleepless-night-20110104-050649-936.html

  16. alpha.sunwing.ca

    Are you ready to book your next vacation with alpha.sunwing.ca? This webpage helps you find out the travel requirements for various destinations, including COVID-19 testing, vaccination, and quarantine rules. You can also learn more about the exclusive perks and benefits of flying with Sunwing Airlines, such as free seat selection, priority boarding, and flexible booking options. Don't miss ...

  17. Is it safe to travel to Mexico? Here's what you need to know

    There are 32 states in Mexico, and the US State Department has "do not travel" advisories in place for six, including Tamaulipas state, where Matamoros is located.

  18. Things To Do In Riviera Maya, Mexico

    THINGS TO DO IN RIVIERA MAYA. Discover Riviera Maya under our wing with a wide range of Sunwing Experiences excursions. Choose from some of the best excursions in Riviera Maya for every travel style, whether you want to explore the ancient Mayan ruins of Tulum and Chichén Itzá, swim in breathtaking cenotes hidden in the jungle or spend the day at one of the Xcaret and Xplor adventure parks.

  19. Mexico Travel Advisory

    U.S. DEPARTMENT of STATE — BUREAU of CONSULAR AFFAIRS. Travel.State.Gov > Travel Advisories > Mexico Travel Advisory. Congressional Liaison; Special Issuance Agency; Legal Resources

  20. Sunwing Travel Group Expands Resorts In Mexico

    Sunwing Travel Group is gearing up for the opening of its newest all-inclusive resort in the Riviera Maya, Mexico - the Royalton Splash Riviera Cancun which is slated to open Dec. 20, 2022. Samantha Taylor, Chief Marketing Officer at Sunwing, said that: "For 11 years and counting, Sunwing's resort division has continued to expand its…more ›

  21. Canada's Mexico travel advisory: Is visiting safe in 2024?

    Updated Mexico travel advisory for Canada in 2024. In 2022, Canada and its neighbours south of the border issued updated advisories for parts of Mexico due to violent crime, including homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery. There continue to be high rates of these types of crime in popular tourist destinations such as the Mayan Riviera ...

  22. Extreme Adventure

    Embark on a series of adventures on land, air and sea in the depths of the jungle! Start on Mexico's longest zipline and soar 60 metres (200 feet) above the riverscapes and along the massive treetops. Try to spot the diverse variety of wildlife and beautiful flora as you zip over 305 metres (1000 feet) across the jungle.

  23. Home

    Xcaret will steal your heart. Mexico's ecological and archaeological park in the Riviera Maya is an adventure with over 40 attractions offering something for everyone in your group! Explore the clear waters of the underground lazy river tour. Snorkel in sparkling lagoons, float down Paradise River, or lounge on a sunny beach.