NASA, California Institute of Technology, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory Page Header Title

golden record

  • The Contents
  • The Making of

where are they now

  • frequently asked questions
  • Q&A with Ed Stone
  • Register for a new account
  • Request new password
  • Map of Members
  • Competitive Program

NASA VR / 360 multimedia for Planetarium Shows and Informal Education

nasa 3d tour

“Step inside NASA's shoes.”

Length:  ~ 5 minutes each Cost:  Free Last updated:  May 2024 Format: Live, interactive, and short clips/stills, with some fully immersive Virtual Reality (VR) experiences, and some Augmented Reality (AR) experiences  Software: Digital Sky 2 buttons, Uniview instructions, Digistar instructions, Digitalis instructions, Emerald Planetarium instructions, Shira player instructions, ePlanetarium instructions, OpenSpace instructions , some Rift, some Vive, and general media

This is a collection of media and tools, which includes 360 spherical images/videos using equirectangular warping.  Members can access  an interactive, planetarium curriculum using these assets.  The media here should be usable by most digital planetarium systems, headset Virtual Reality, and smartphone VR setups, with minimum extra work to import them. There are also some true, interactive VR experiences listed on this page.  Files are downloadable below, including videos. See the NASA Media Use Policy  and the  JPL Image Use Policy .

Latest addition:   From NASA Goddard, Black Hole Visualization Takes Viewers Beyond the Brink , downloadable in 4k and 8k.  From NASA JPL, Explore Mars’ Gediz Vallis Channel With NASA’s Curiosity Rover , downloadable 8k version here .  From NASA Kennedy,  360 View Inside Artemis Emergency Egress Basket , available in higher than 4k resolution upon request .

Need help or have quesitons?   [email protected]

  • NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory  specializes in robotic space and Earth exploration, and is home to the Deep Space Network .
  • NASA Marshall Space Flight Center specializes in rocket engines and human spaceflight assembly.
  • NASA Kennedy Space Center  specializes in launching space missions.
  • NASA Johnson Space Center specializes in human exploration and operations.
  • NASA Ames Research Center specializes in information technology, aerospace, and aeronautics.
  • NASA Goddard Space Flight Center  specializes in space telescopes, solar missions, and test chambers.  It's also home of the Scientific Visualization Studio, who has its own  360 and planetarium  content.
  • NASA Langley Research Center specializes in aviation, Earth's atmosphere, and technology.
  • NASA Glenn Research Center specializes in developing technology for aeronautics and space, including communications, propulsion, biomedical, and more.
  • NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center  specializes in aircraft innovations including design, fabrication, operations, and more.
  • NASA Stennis Space Center  specializes in rocket propulsion testing.
  • NASA partners and projects  includes Hubble, Chandra, and other content.
  • Other space-related VR and 360 content

For the public to try at home, view these YouTube 360 videos using your mobile device or computer, no goggles or other equipment is required.  Total length of the entire playlist is over 2.5 hours long (data charges may apply).  Pick your favorites and wow your friends and family with a rocket launch or trip to Mars!  Also, while not strictly VR, try the web browser 360 experience  NASA's Home and City  that details NASA spin offs. There may be some third-party content on this page.  NASA does not endorse third-party content.  Any third-party content is provided as examples of how NASA science can be used.  Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in third-party materials are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of NASA.

Possible uses for museums and educators include the following:

  • Use inside your existing planetarium shows, e.g. live, "space update" or "sky tonight" shows (see more information below for talking points), or use them in creating new shows.
  • Use the alpha-channeled images as accurate panoramas for Martian landscapes.
  • Use in a classroom, library, on the museum floor, or at a science festival.  They work with most mobile devices, computers, and of course full VR rigs.  Download for offline use to increase performance and reliabilty, and to decrease cellular data usage or Wi-Fi congestion.  Third party VR players may be needed.

NASA 360 videos and VR experiences:

  • JPL Virtual Tour
  • Earth 360 Video: The Call of Science  with downloadable mp4 .  Also see clips from that feature , available for download .
  • 5,000 Exoplanets: Listen to the Sounds of Discovery , downloadable here .  Note as of posting, this item has flipped the Milky Way layer.  A corrected version is downloadable here .
  • TRAPPIST-1d  - information for the artist concept  surface 360 video , with  labeled  and  unlabeled  stills (See more  TRAPPIST-1 art )
  • See our other exoplanet surface 360 web experiences , includes talking points and features of interest on the surfaces.
  • From the above web experience, download the 8K still of Kepler-16b's moon surface artist concept , and members can download modified versions of Kepler-186f's surface  here .
  • NASA Solar System Treks for Mars  and the Moon  feature "Experience TrekVR" under the settings "wrench," which is compatible with smartphone and goggle set ups.
  • JPL Space Flight Operations Facility and Mars Yard  - With static images of  Mars Yard  featuring Christina Diaz ,  SFOF  featuring Tracy Drain , as well as the Rover Ride Along  360 video
  • Perseverance 360 "Van Zyl" view complete with audio , 8k file , 23k file , and 8k labeled version .
  • The first panorama from the Perseverance rover , with downloadable 4k file .
  • Explore Mars’ Gediz Vallis Channel With NASA’s Curiosity Rover , downloadable 8k version here .
  • Curiosity at Gediz Vallis Ridge , with downloadable still , labeled , and overlay  with separate image .
  • Atop 'Mont Mercou' , with downloadable 360 PNG (higher than 8k) .
  • Glen Torridon  - 8k mp4 .
  • Teal Ridge - 8k MP4
  • Vera Rubin Ridge - Departs 4K
  • Vera Rubin Ridge Panorama for the  8K Curiosity Mars Rover on Vera Rubin Ridge
  • Ogunquit Beach  
  • Murray Buttes , and for the title image at the top of this page , see the original posting , and the JPL feature for talking points.
  • Naukluft Plateau
  • Namib Dune  - For members only, see a version with alpha channeled sky .
  • Pathfinder  - talking points for the 360 video
  • Spirit - October 2016 McMurdo Panorama with alpha channel sky
  • The  Engineering for Mars 2020 file  is a compressed version of the full 1.3 GB file, which is  available here .  Learn more about  Mars 2020 .
  • Engineering for Mars - Mars InSight mission  at the In-situ lab at JPL is a 360 video in 60fps. Learn more about Insight here , which is landing on Mars in November 2018, and hear our archived conversations with the mission leads . For those having playback issues, Mars InSight  has a compressed version that may work for your dome/headset.
  • Cassini Grand Finale  - talking points for the  Cassini Farewell from JPL , which is a ZIP file containing select shots and clips from the 360 livestream from the Cassini mission end on September 15, 2017.  The full, Emmy-award winning , 90 minute, 234 GB file can be viewed  here on YouTube .  The flat screen version can be viewed  here on YouTube .  Also, there's the  360 animation .
  • Ceres Occator Crater   - talking points for the  360 flyby
  • Juno  - resources and talking points for the  360 animation  with  extra audio , and  360 mission control for Jupiter Orbit Insertion   back to the top
  • 4K Virtual Tour  takes audiences inside Flight Hardware Development, Payload Operations, and Propulsion Research Facilities.  Download here as a ZIP file.
  • 8K " Step Inside NASA's Rocket Factory: The Michoud Assembly Facility " with captions ,  4k option , and audio  - For those having playback issues  Michoud is a compressed version that may work for your dome/headset.
  • NASA Marshall  working on the  Orion spacecraft
  • The  Space Launch System's Intertank transportation  - the 8K file is encoded using H265, let us know if you need help processing it for your planetarium. For those having playback issues, SLS - Intertank  is a compressed version that may work for your dome/headset.
  • The U.S. Space & Rocket Center’s “ISS: Science on Orbit” Exhibit , with 8k-upscaled, compressed download here (uncompressed 4GB video available upon request).
  • Human Exploration Rover Challenge VR Test footage back to the top
  •  360 View Inside Artemis Emergency Egress Basket , available in higher than 4k resolution upon request , compressed version available for download .
  • Orion in 360 Degrees  video with downloadable stills here , here , and here .
  • NASA’s Artemis I Rocket at Rollout , downloadable here .
  • Orion to SLS 360 video with downloadable MP4
  • Artemis I Stage Adapter Lift and Mate , with downloadable MP4
  • Artemis I Core Stage Lift and Mate , with downloadable 4k MP4
  • SLS Core Stage Pathfinder Lift, Camera 1 , and Camera 2
  • Artemis Path to the Pad: Crawler-Transporter 2 , with downloadable 4k file .
  • Artemis Path to the Pad: Testing, software and the Launch Control Center with even more
  • Installation of Orion's Spacecraft Adapter Cone , with downloadable 4k file .
  • A New Era in Spaceflight 
  • Video Highlights
  • Preparing to Launch America
  • Boeing CST-100 Starliner
  • SpaceX Crew Dragon
  • Launching from Kennedy Space Center
  • Train Like an Astronaut
  • Walk inside the Vehicle Assembly Building that assembles rockets for their final launch configuration.  See the downloadable MP4 .
  • For the Parker Solar Probe mission , see the Launch 360 , with an  extra audio file .
  • For the  Tracking and Data Relay Satellites , see the  Launch 360  with an  extra audio file ​
  • For  Osiris Rex , see the  Launch 360  with an  extra audio file   
  • For the  Joint Polar Satellite System , see the  Launch 360  with an  extra audio file  
  • For the GOES missions , see the GOES-S Launch in 360 back to the top
  • Nine Ways We Use AR and VR on the International Space Station  - article only
  • Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory Tour
  • For members, try this fisheye dome view from the ISS cupola , other ISS 360 content , and Space Shuttle 360 content
  • NASA Astronaut training pool  with 4k downloadable .
  • See inside the  HERA – the Human Exploration Research Analog  as well as outside
  • Space Launch System Virtual Tour  for the Oculus Rift
  • Spacesuit Training in a Vacuum  download link
  • Welcome Home , the landing of the latest ISS crew in June 2018 back to the top
  • Testing Small Spacecraft Communications Technology
  • Wind Tunnel Test of NASA’s Most Powerful Rocket   back to the top
  • Black Hole Visualization Takes Viewers Beyond the Brink , downloadable in 4k and 8k
  • A Web Around Asteroid Bennu , downloadable 8k version  here
  • Reference Elevation Model of Antarctica (REMA)  downloadable 360 video
  • Worldview Snapshots , an updated database of global mosaics of Earth, so you can download and display the very latest Earth image in your planetarium or other exhibit.  (Most uses will need the "Suomi" or the "NOAA" "True Color" maps.)
  • Sample Asteroid Bennu in 360 , with downloadable HD file  and 8k file (for members only).
  • Deep Star Maps  for rendering 360 space scenes
  • Fly above Alaskan Glaciers
  • Hubble Locations 360 Tour , Career Page , and Hubble Spacecraft 360 tour  (member planetariums can access an  offline version ).
  • Black holes in 360
  • James Webb 360  with audio , and James Webb at Johnson  
  • Inside Hurricane Maria in 360
  • Moon Phases in 360 designed for systems such as Science on a Sphere. 
  • Hubble's 28th Anniversary from the Space Telescope Operations Control Center
  • Tracking Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) Orbital Fleet  animation
  • Not strictly 360, but a spherical display projection of the 2017 eclipse . back to the top
  • Take a  Virtual Tour  (scroll down at each location to see the interactive 360 images)
  • For members, see the 360 media packet for offline use.
  • 360 Video of Greased Lightning GL-10 in flight back to the top
  • Take a Virtual Tour
  • For members, see the 360 multimedia packet for offline use. back to the top
  • Armstrong Virtual Tour
  • NASA’s ER-2 Cockpit During HyspIRI Hawaii Mission  - download here for offline use.
  • F-18 Sonic Boom Dive , with downloadable  mp4 back to the top
  • RS-25 Engine Test, video from NASA MSFC , with a printable infographic about the RS-25 Engine , for the 4 minute and 2 minute cut. back to the top
  • From Fiske Planetarium, with NASA partnerships, a collection of free fulldome movies and clips , including some VR 360 content, such as the Forward to the Moon 360 clip  from the newly released fulldome film.
  • Final Ariane 5 liftoff , downloadable here .
  • Updated International Space Station 360 tours , some in French with English subtitles, downloadable here  and here  with still images , latest addition Apr, 2022.
  • Space Station 360  with online playlist , also an  ISS 360 Tour with astronaut Tim Peake
  • From the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex,  Explore NASA’s 70-Meter Deep Space Communications Dish , with the Spanish Language version .
  • 360 Virtual Tour of the Chandra Operations Control Center (OCC) , including other VR and relevant resources.
  • Reach Across the Stars, women in STEM AR app
  • Walking Among the Stars , a series of VR products including 360 videos, Vive, and AR
  • An Immersive Visualization of the Galactic Center  - talking points for the  downloadable 360 video , and see the "sequel"  released in March 2019 with a downloadable 4k version . 
  • Spitzer's Final Voyage 360 video  (and updated for 2021 ), 8k version available for download .
  • NASA's Exoplanet Excursions VR Experience , for Vive, Oculus, and YouTube 360, downloadable 360 video here  (8k 60fps).  Planetariums and other content developers may also be interested in their TRAPPIST-1 planet surface textures .
  • WebbVR  for the Vive, a free, "true VR," interactive game.
  • Fly through the Orion Nebula.  Info and downloadable  dome masters for planetariums are here , and the  360 file is here .  Also, see the updated versions in Infrared , Visible , and Combined wavelengths, with those dome masters here: Infrared , Visible , and Combined .
  • Space Telescope AR app, for iOS
  • From Arizona State University, with NASA partnerships, a global and interplanetary  Virtual Field Trip  web experience and mobile experience . back to the top

Please note that NASA does not endorse or verify third-party commercial content.  These are examples of how NASA science can be used.  Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in third-party materials are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of NASA.

  • From the Cedar Falls High School Rocket Club - a 360 look from inside a rocket launch on April 28, 2022  and one from April 8, 2022
  • From Space Center Houston - Saturn V Rocket stages
  • From the Planetarium Laupheim - free, fulldome feature "Red-Eye to the Star" planetarium movie about SOFIA , available in VR/360 format , too 
  • From the Clark Planetarium, their "Dome from Home" Series of 360 videos .
  • From the Museum of Science, Boston, tour NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center .
  • From Lockheed Martin, see the loading of the Orion Spacecraft.
  • From the BBC, Total Solar Eclipse from Space 360
  • From the National Space Centre, in the UK, ObserVRtarium for Vive and Rift. Also, see the Capcom Go 360 video and AR apps about the Apollo missions.
  • From the Smithsonian, 360 images and a full 3D model of the Apollo 11 CM  are a part of their full 3D printable collection.
  • From the European Southern Observatory, there's a library of 360 panoramas , and VR videos
  • From the BMC, Black Hole VR 360 video
  • From BBI, Project Eagle: A 3D Interactive Mars Base  for the Vive.
  • From Mission ISS , a 360 flythrough of a digital ISS  to accompany their Rift experience.
  • From Google Street View - explore the ISS through Google Maps , and try this public photo library  to construct your own 360 or fulldome images/videos (members only) . 
  • From FMG Labs, Mars 2030 VR experience  for Vive and Rift - read about it on the  NASA site , and note that the experience may be free for educators if you contact them with your educational email address.
  • From Google Expeditions - host virtual tours of the Juno mission NASA centers, the ISS, Mars, and more.  Just search for "NASA" in the app.
  • From NBC News: Inside Boeing's Starliner Capsule
  • From 8i, Cycling Pathways on Mars for Vive, and a 360 trailer from TIME
  • From USA Today, 360 walk on the Moon .
  • From the New York Times, 360, narrated flyby of Pluto with New Horizons
  • From NOAA, not exactly 360, but might still work for some setups -  Science on a Sphere Space database .
  • Taken at the California Science Center, the  Endeavor  space shuttle talking points for the cylinder panorama in " JPL VR Images ZIP ."  Also, consider this  Space Shuttle 360 video , and this Space Shuttle Carrier 360 video .
  • From the USGS,  Apollo 11  talking points for the cylinder panorama in " JPL VR Images ZIP " (note those cylinders can be easily converted to spherical 360 images). For members , see our Apollo 50th anniversary resource list . 
  • From National Geographic One Strange Rock ~5-minute 3D 360 film about the ISS and astronauts.
  • From the Planetary Society, see Seán Doran's  Curiosity selfie 360  (source of the page image)
  • back to the top

As more 360º video and VR content is released, this page will be updated.  As general tips for planetariums using 360 video, most systems allow you to adjust the tilt and camera center within the spherical video so you can see more landscape, and/or focus on areas of interest throughout the video.  Play with a video to see what the best angles and positions are for your dome setup, and members can ask questions: [email protected] .

  • Download the image/video
  • Get a set of GPS coordinates to locate a sphere on an object (e.g., Earth or Mars).  
  • Create an OpenSpace asset (see this example  for Mars at -4.69520223,137.3530064 ) where you can use the GlobeTranslation to attach a RenderableSphere to mars.  The GPS coordinates get fed to the GlobeTranslation and the image path gets fed to the RenderableSphere as a texture. 
  • The 'Size' of the RenderableSphere in meters. For 360 images, the numbers are usually arbitrary.
  • The Altitude of the GlobeTranslation, by default, when using the heightmap it will put the sphere 1/2 into the ground, so you may have to adjust the altitude based on the size value chosen.
  • Then set the X, Y, and Z Rotation of the sphere.
  • In the OpenSpace settings, open the NaigationHandler -> OrbitalNavigator and change the 'Minimum allowed distance" to 1 to get inside the panorama.  Ideally you'll want to locate yourself directly in, or as close to the center of the sphere to avoid too much warping of the view.  
  • These  Digital Sky 2 buttons include example placement, movement and rotation buttons for your presenters to move and look around the simulations.  Note that these buttons are provided merely as examples, and contain only the first few 360 items that were released in 2016.  If you run into any issues using the newer 360 content, please let us know (see the team chat link above).
  • Essentially, it creates a sphere primitive using the 360 items as a Material/Texture, and moves the sphere around the camera at different angles to simulate the experience.
  • This uses geometric primitives and was made on version 2.4.  
  • Remember that file names and file locations need to match in the code.
  • Members can access a planetarium curriculum with another example Digital Sky 2 button set, script, and media packet.
  • For Dark Matter Users: Create a sphere asset, parent it to the Camera. Create a Media Asset, load your video there. Set your Inner Emissive to "Media:" then the Media Asset Name, e.g. "Media:MediaAssetName" (note: NOT the file name). You'll have to tweak it for your dome and for each video. For example, you can set diffuse to black, set the Z position to 0.5 to see a bit more of the horizon, (note: you sacrifice some warping at the zenith for that), and you can tilt it and rotate, too, if you want change the view in the dome and/or look at the "ground." 

For videos inside World Viewer (From the WorldViewer Manual, starting on Page 17):

  • Panoramic images and videos can be placed on your virtual Earth, allowing people to quickly navigate to and explore immersive content. Drag a 360-degree panoramic image onto a blank cell within the Panos track. Assign this to a “Geolocated Panorama” clip type.
  • Once you’ve loaded a pano bubble, you can click the Fly To radio button under Playback Controls to toggle flying in or out. The Home button also moves the camera out of a pano bubble and back to a zoomed out view of Earth. It’s also possible to load 360-degree movies. When you fly to a movie clip, it will begin playing as soon as you click on “Fly to.”
  • Flying into geolocated panoramas, you may notice the pano bubble's horizon line is not parallel to the spring line of your dome. Use the tilt settings of the pano in order to align it with your dome's geometry.

For stills inside Uniview:

  • In your content “Library” under the “Surface Locations” tab
  • You can do this with any of your locations, or you can “Create a new surface location”, e.g. by clicking the “+”. 
  • Select the location that you want, and you want to “Show properties.” On some systems, click the little notepad icon with a pencil on it. 
  • There you’ll see all the different settings, and you should play around with those numbers, like altitude and azimuth to tweak the final appearance.  However, the main one you want is the “Panorama” settings.  There’s a setting for “Day Image” and “Night Image.” 
  • For TRAPPIST, for example, set one or both to one of these images:  labeled and unlabeled  respectively.  Make sure the file path is correct.  For some reason, some versions always omit the “C:” at the beginning of the path. 
  • Then you just need to set “Coverage Min” and “Coverage Max” to -90, and 90, respectively. 
  • Save it, and then whenever you go to “Sky Mode” for that location, you will be able to show that panorama.  
  • Note that for Digital Sky, we actually move the 360 image slightly higher, so you're actually a little lower than the center of the image, and you can see more of the image on the dome.  If you desire to do that, it might be more complicated, but might be worth it, especially for some images.  You may also want to figure out a way to move the image around to view different vantage points.  Also, if your system can't play videos in this mode, you can still take frame captures and import stills from the 360 videos using this method.  If you need help with doing that, simply let us know.
  • Simply drag and drop the desired video or image into your display window.
  • Select "spherical" from the pop up window.
  • Just add ".360" between file name and file type.  For instance: "coolNASAstuff.360.png" or "coolNASAstuff.360.mpg
  • The file then can be played either through the Digitalis media browser on the remote control, or from the media tab if you have Universal Console. 
  • The operator can then re-orient the image or video on the fly using either the Xbox controller or the Universal Console. 
  • It is also possible to write a script which sets the system to a particular lat/lon at a specific time. For an example script, see this member resource .
  • Simply open the file using the dedicated 360-pro-player.
  • Select Panorama conversion.

For Shira Universe users 1. Simply browse and open the file using the Media Manager . 2. Video or image dimension should be 2:1 rate to dedicate automatically. (for example  8192x4096) 3. If not 2:1 ratio please resize it using ffmpeg for videos.

For Shira Player users 1. Simply move video files to defined Fulldome path, Image files to panorama path. 2. Video or image dimension should be 2:1 rate to dedicate automatically. (for example 8192x4096) 3. If not 2:1 ratio please resize it using ffmpeg for videos.

As always, we welcome feedback, bug reports, reporting broken links, examples/instructions for other planetarium systems, tips, tricks, etc. Just  email us .

You may also like:  

  • NASA's 3D model library  and the Solar System 3D model library for 3D printers, maker spaces, design/production studios, etc.
  • NASA's AR apps and resources .
  • NOAA's Science on a Sphere datasets

This special Resource has been made available to all viewers.  Please note that (free) membership is required for full access to the Museum Alliance site; please visit  Join Our Community  to learn more.

Search tag: free, download, downloadable, Virtual Reality, 360 degree videos, images, show

  • Curiosity at Teal Ridge 8k MP4 (131.78 MB)
  • Curiosity at Vera Rubin Ridge - Goodbye 4K MP4 (395.03 MB)
  • Curiosity at Vera Rubin Ridge 8k PNG (29.17 MB)
  • Curiosity at Vera Rubin Ridge 8k unlabeled PNG (31.37 MB)
  • Curiosity at Vera Rubin Ridge 8k MP4 (1 minute) (809.64 MB)
  • Curiosity at Ogunquit Beach (1 minute) MP4 (103.6 MB)
  • Curiosity at Ogunquit Beach with labels and alpha PNG (4.68 MB)
  • Curiosity at Ogunquit Beach clean with alpha PNG (4.53 MB)
  • Curiosity at Ogunquit Beach with title and alpha PNG (4.84 MB)
  • Curiosity at Namib Dune PNG (8.65 MB)
  • Curiosity at Namib Dune (2 minutes) MP4 (177.72 MB)
  • Curiosity at Naukluft Plateau (2 minutes) MP4 (177.4 MB)
  • Curiosity at Naukluft Plateau witlh alpha PNG (4.14 MB)
  • Curiosity at Naukluft Plateau witlh alpha, labeled PNG (4.25 MB)
  • Curiosity at Murray Buttes (2 minutes) MP4 (173.03 MB)
  • Curiosity at Murray Butes with alpha PNG (5.31 MB)
  • Curiosity at Murray Butes with alpha, labeled PNG (5.36 MB)
  • Kepler 16b Surface - Artist Concept 8K unlabeled PNG (17.66 MB)
  • TRAPPIST-1d Surface - Artist Concept - MP4 (270.51 MB)
  • TRAPPIST-1d Surface - Artist Concept -Labeled PNG (4.4 MB)
  • TRAPPIST-1d Surface - Artist Concept - UnLabeled PNG (8.48 MB)
  • Rover Ride Along MP4 (187.31 MB)
  • JPL Mars Yard featuring Christina Diaz JPG (2.13 MB)
  • JPL Spaceflight Operations Facility featuring Tracy Drain JPG (1.41 MB)
  • RS-25 Engine test from NASA MSFC (4 minute cut) MP4 (399.24 MB)
  • RS-25 Engine test from NASA MSFC (2 minute cut) MP4 (208.62 MB)
  • An Immersive Visualization of the Galactic Center MP4 (187.8 MB)
  • Launch - Tracking and Data Relay Satellites compressed (5 minutes) MP4 (356.6 MB)
  • Launch - Tracking and Data Relay Satellites audio compressed (5 minutes) MP3 (5.14 MB)
  • Launch - Osiris Rex (5 minutes) MP4 (414.96 MB)
  • Launch - Osiris Rex audio (5 minutes) MP3 (4.35 MB)
  • Launch - Joint Polar Launch (3 minutes) MP4 (453.93 MB)
  • Launch - Joint Polar Launch audio (3 minutes) MP3 (2.84 MB)
  • Mars Insight Testing (3 minutes) 60fps MP4 (255.05 MB)
  • SLS Intertank (1 minute) 8K h265 MP4 (75.59 MB)
  • GOES-S Launch Atlas V (3 minutes) MP4 (439.6 MB)
  • Mars 2020 EDL assembly compressed (3 minutes) MP4 (100.11 MB)
  • Mars 2020 EDL assembly audio (3 minutes) MP3 (2.79 MB)
  • NASA Juno: Mission to Jupiter 360 audio (4 minutes) MP3 (3.87 MB)
  • NASA Juno: Mission to Jupiter 360 (4 minutes) MP4 (339.92 MB)
  • Cassini Grand Finale (1 minute) MP4 (91.59 MB)
  • Pathfinder 360 (2 minutes) MP4 (177.68 MB)
  • Mission Control for Juno Insertion, 7-4-2016 360 (2 minutes) MP4 (132.36 MB)
  • Ceres 360 MP4 (117.55 MB)
  • Cassini Farewell from JPL ZIP (492.96 MB)
  • NASA Marshall Orion Assembly (2 minutes, compressed) MP4 (109.19 MB)
  • Michoud Assembly Facility MP4 (571.8 MB)
  • Michoud Assembly Facility captions SRT (4 KB)
  • Michoud Assembly Facility MP3 (2.69 MB)
  • Michoud Assembly Facility 4k MP4 (127.71 MB)
  • James Webb in clean room MP4 (78.71 MB)
  • James Webb in clean room MP3 (3.27 MB)
  • IPAC Exoplanet Excursions MP4 (8k 60fps) (336.02 MB)
  • Parker Solar Probe Assembly and Launch MP4 (165.03 MB)
  • Parker Solar Probe Assembly and Launch MP3 (3.18 MB)
  • NASA's F-18 WSPRR Sonic Boom Dive MP4 (156.6 MB)
  • Curiosity at Gediz PNG (22.74 MB)
  • Curiosity at Gediz Overlay PNG (22.15 MB)
  • Curiosity at Gediz Labeled PNG (22.92 MB)
  • Download File (326.75 MB)
  • 3D Printing
  • Images and Textures
  • Visualizations
  • Contributors
  • 3D in the News
  • science.nasa.gov
  • NASA Solar System Treks
  • NASA Mars Trek
  • NASA Vesta Trek
  • NASA’s Eyes
  • National Institutes of Health 3D Print
  • Article: "Printing Space: Using 3D Printing"
  • 3D Printing in space
  • 3D Models Put Students in Touch with Planets
  • JPL Infographics - SLS:BIG
  • Lunar Models
  • Mars Models

Welcome to the International Space Station (ISS), Astronaut. In Station Spacewalk Game you'll experience the thrill of conducting NASA repair work on the International Space Station. After negotiating your way through the airlock, you, the astronaut, will be tasked with jobs critical to help power up the space station so it can continue to operate. First take your time to explore the station, but then it's time to get to work. You'll have to move quickly and carefully, with a limited quantity of oxygen you must complete your Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) and get back into the airlock before your air supply runs out.

This video game features simulations of actual EVAs conducted by NASA astronauts on missions to provide power to the space station. The graphics used in this game are based on real NASA missions and incorporate 3D graphics used by the Agency.

Mission Objectives

  • Explore the ISS. Before you get started with your EVAs, feel free to explore the ISS. Enjoy your self-guided tour.
  • Install the S6 Truss. You are tasked with installing the fourth starboard Integrated Truss Segment (S6). Trusses are essential to the continuation of the International Space Station because they form the backbone of the station.
  • Unfurl the S6 Solar Arrays. The space station's main source of energy comes from three of the four large photovoltaic arrays currently on the station, sometimes referred to as the Solar Array Wings (SAW). Can you assemble the fourth set of solar arrays to the station?
  • Ride the Robotic Arm. There's a tear in the solar array! Can you ride the robotic arm then use the clamps to fix the tear?
  • Retrieve Your Tools. You have used a lot of tools to do your repair work. Now many of them are scattered in space. How many of them can you retrieve before heading back to the airlock?
  • Conduct SPHERES experiments. SPHERES are tiny satellites being tested by NASA on the ISS. Someday they'll help astronauts study space and possibly even assist with in-orbit construction projects. But first they must learn to fly in formation. Can you help the SPHERES navigate their way through the hoops in NASA's experiment?
  • Restore Space-to-Ground Communications. The ISS has lost voice and data contact with mission control. Take a space walk to bring communications back on line by powering an auxiliary antenna.

Play the Game!

You can play the game in the browser, or download it for the Windows and Mac platforms.

To play the game in your browser, follow the link below or click on the button at the top of the page. If you're trying Station Spacewalk Game for the first time, you'll see a link to download and install the necessary plug-in for your browser. Be patient, it may take a minute or two. Once the plug-in is installed, you're ready for your trip to the International Space Station!

~ Play the Game ~

To download a stand-alone version of the software, click the appropriate download link at the right. On Windows, simply unzip the download and double click on the resulting installer to install the game. On OS X, double click the downloaded zip file to unarchive it, then double click the resulting application to play the game.

Alternatively, there is a text description of the game.

Would you like to create your own video game? Visit http://nasa3d.arc.nasa.gov to download free 3D models from NASA.

Station Spacewalk Game

NASA Logo

New NASA Black Hole Visualization Takes Viewers Beyond the Brink

Ever wonder what happens when you fall into a black hole? Now, thanks to a new, immersive visualization produced on a NASA supercomputer, viewers can plunge into the event horizon, a black hole’s point of no return.

“People often ask about this, and simulating these difficult-to-imagine processes helps me connect the mathematics of relativity to actual consequences in the real universe,” said Jeremy Schnittman, an astrophysicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, who created the visualizations. “So I simulated two different scenarios, one where a camera — a stand-in for a daring astronaut — just misses the event horizon and slingshots back out, and one where it crosses the boundary, sealing its fate.”

The visualizations are available in multiple forms. Explainer videos act as sightseeing guides, illuminating the bizarre effects of Einstein’s general theory of relativity. Versions rendered as 360-degree videos let viewers look all around during the trip, while others play as flat all-sky maps.

To create the visualizations, Schnittman teamed up with fellow Goddard scientist Brian Powell and used the Discover supercomputer at the NASA Center for Climate Simulation . The project generated about 10 terabytes of data — equivalent to roughly half of the estimated text content in the Library of Congress — and took about 5 days running on just 0.3% of Discover’s 129,000 processors. The same feat would take more than a decade on a typical laptop.

The destination is a supermassive black hole with 4.3 million times the mass of our Sun, equivalent to the monster located at the center of our Milky Way galaxy.

“If you have the choice, you want to fall into a supermassive black hole,” Schnittman explained. “Stellar-mass black holes, which contain up to about 30 solar masses,  possess much smaller event horizons and stronger tidal forces, which can rip apart approaching objects before they get to the horizon.”

This occurs because the gravitational pull on the end of an object nearer the black hole is much stronger than that on the other end. Infalling objects stretch out like noodles, a process astrophysicists call spaghettification .

The simulated black hole’s event horizon spans about 16 million miles (25 million kilometers), or about 17% of the distance from Earth to the Sun. A flat, swirling cloud of hot, glowing gas called an accretion disk surrounds it and serves as a visual reference during the fall. So do glowing structures called photon rings, which form closer to the black hole from light that has orbited it one or more times. A backdrop of the starry sky as seen from Earth completes the scene.

As the camera approaches the black hole, reaching speeds ever closer to that of light itself, the glow from the accretion disk and background stars becomes amplified in much the same way as the sound of an oncoming racecar rises in pitch. Their light appears brighter and whiter when looking into the direction of travel.

The movies begin with the camera located nearly 400 million miles (640 million kilometers) away, with the black hole quickly filling the view. Along the way, the black hole’s disk, photon rings, and the night sky become increasingly distorted — and even form multiple images as their light traverses the increasingly warped space-time.

In real time, the camera takes about 3 hours to fall to the event horizon, executing almost two complete 30-minute orbits along the way. But to anyone observing from afar, it would never quite get there. As space-time becomes ever more distorted closer to the horizon, the image of the camera would slow and then seem to freeze just shy of it. This is why astronomers originally referred to black holes as “frozen stars.”

At the event horizon, even space-time itself flows inward at the speed of light, the cosmic speed limit. Once inside it, both the camera and the space-time in which it's moving rush toward the black hole's center — a one-dimensional point called a singularity , where the laws of physics as we know them cease to operate.

“Once the camera crosses the horizon, its destruction by spaghettification is just 12.8 seconds away,” Schnittman said. From there, it’s only 79,500 miles (128,000 kilometers) to the singularity. This final leg of the voyage is over in the blink of an eye.

In the alternative scenario, the camera orbits close to the event horizon but it never crosses over and escapes to safety. If an astronaut flew a spacecraft on this 6-hour round trip while her colleagues on a mothership remained far from the black hole, she’d return 36 minutes younger than her colleagues. That’s because time passes more slowly near a strong gravitational source and when moving near the speed of light.

“This situation can be even more extreme,” Schnittman noted. “If the black hole were rapidly rotating, like the one shown in the 2014 movie ‘Interstellar,’ she would return many years younger than her shipmates.”

By Francis Reddy NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center , Greenbelt, Md. Media Contact: Claire Andreoli 301-286-1940 [email protected] NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Related Terms

  • Astrophysics
  • Black Holes
  • Galaxies, Stars, & Black Holes
  • Galaxies, Stars, & Black Holes Research
  • Goddard Space Flight Center
  • Supermassive Black Holes
  • The Universe

Explore More

Discovery alert: an earth-sized world and its ultra-cool star.

Three bright stars with diffraction spikes shine near the center-right of the image, illuminating nearby clouds that glow in pale blue. The clouds darken at the edges of the image, and are dotted with smaller stars, some also with diffraction spikes.

Hubble Views the Dawn of a Sun-like Star 

nasa 3d tour

NASA Tests Technology, Practices Artemis Moonwalks in Arizona Desert

To prepare for exploring the Moon during NASA’s Artemis campaign, the agency is conducting a week-long field test in the lunar-like landscape of San Francisco Volcanic Field near Flagstaff, Arizona to practice moonwalk scenarios. NASA astronauts Kate Rubins and Andre Douglas are serving as the crewmembers and wearing mockup spacesuit systems as they traverse through […]

NASA Logo

Suggested Searches

  • Climate Change
  • Expedition 64
  • Mars perseverance
  • SpaceX Crew-2
  • International Space Station
  • View All Topics A-Z

Humans in Space

Earth & climate, the solar system, the universe.

Aeronautics

Learning Resources

News & events.

NASA astronauts Kate Rubins and Andre Douglas push a tool cart loaded with lunar tools through the San Francisco Volcanic Field north of Flagstaff, Arizona, as they practice moonwalking operations for Artemis III.

NASA Tests Technology, Practices Artemis Moonwalks in Arizona Desert

Engineers test the VIPER rover's wheel movement and rotation in a clean room at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.

Mission Manager Update: VIPER Rover Approved to Move into Environmental Testing!

In a field in western Kentucky, a machine sprays cover crops

How ‘Glowing’ Plants Could Help Scientists Predict Flash Drought

  • Search All NASA Missions
  • A to Z List of Missions
  • Upcoming Launches and Landings
  • Spaceships and Rockets
  • Communicating with Missions
  • James Webb Space Telescope
  • Hubble Space Telescope
  • Why Go to Space
  • Astronauts Home
  • Commercial Space
  • Destinations
  • Living in Space
  • Explore Earth Science
  • Earth, Our Planet
  • Earth Science in Action
  • Earth Multimedia
  • Earth Science Researchers
  • Pluto & Dwarf Planets
  • Asteroids, Comets & Meteors
  • The Kuiper Belt
  • The Oort Cloud
  • Skywatching
  • The Search for Life in the Universe
  • Black Holes
  • The Big Bang
  • Dark Energy & Dark Matter
  • Earth Science
  • Planetary Science
  • Astrophysics & Space Science
  • The Sun & Heliophysics
  • Biological & Physical Sciences
  • Lunar Science
  • Citizen Science
  • Astromaterials
  • Aeronautics Research
  • Human Space Travel Research
  • Science in the Air
  • NASA Aircraft
  • Flight Innovation
  • Supersonic Flight
  • Air Traffic Solutions
  • Green Aviation Tech
  • Drones & You

Technology Transfer & Spinoffs

  • Space Travel Technology
  • Technology Living in Space
  • Manufacturing and Materials
  • Science Instruments
  • For Kids and Students
  • For Educators
  • For Colleges and Universities
  • For Professionals
  • Science for Everyone
  • Requests for Exhibits, Artifacts, or Speakers
  • STEM Engagement at NASA
  • NASA's Impacts
  • Centers and Facilities
  • Directorates
  • Organizations
  • People of NASA
  • Internships
  • Our History
  • Doing Business with NASA
  • Get Involved
  • Aeronáutica
  • Ciencias Terrestres
  • Sistema Solar
  • All NASA News
  • Video Series on NASA+
  • Newsletters
  • Social Media
  • Media Resources
  • Upcoming Launches & Landings
  • Virtual Events
  • Sounds and Ringtones
  • Interactives
  • STEM Multimedia

Hubble Views the Dawn of a Sun-like Star 

Hubble Views the Dawn of a Sun-like Star 

A woman sits on the floor and looks through an eyepiece device. She is wearing a light brown flight suit. Two people are behind her in blue flight suits and one person in front of her to the right is wearing a light brown flight suit.

Eleasa Kim: Pioneering CLDP Payload Operations and Cultural Integration

NASA astronaut Megan McArthur services donor cells inside the Kibo laboratory module’s Life Science Glovebox for the Celestial Immunity study.

Station Science 101 | Research in Microgravity: Higher, Faster, Longer

Four people converse onboard an aircraft.

NASA Teammates Recall Favorite Memories Aboard Flying Laboratory

A woman poses, smiling with her hands on her hips, in front of the mission control desk onboard an aircraft. She is wearing a tan flysuit, and the switch board behind her is crowded with buttons, switches, monitors, cords, and stickers.

Meet NASA Women Behind World’s Largest Flying Laboratory

The Next Full Moon is the Flower, Corn, or Corn Planting Moon

The Next Full Moon is the Flower, Corn, or Corn Planting Moon

Binoculars: A Great First Telescope

Binoculars: A Great First Telescope

nasa 3d tour

NASA’s New Mobile Launcher Stacks Up for Future Artemis Missions 

The Big Event, 2024

The Big Event, 2024

Hubble Glimpses a Star-Forming Factory

Hubble Glimpses a Star-Forming Factory

Amendment 13: Due Date Delay and FAQ Posted for A.58 Increasing Participation of Minority Serving Institutions in Earth Science Surface-Based Measurement Networks

Amendment 13: Due Date Delay and FAQ Posted for A.58 Increasing Participation of Minority Serving Institutions in Earth Science Surface-Based Measurement Networks

nasa 3d tour

NASA Licenses 3D-Printable Superalloy to Benefit US Economy

Jim Gentes wearing the Jiro Prolight bicycle helmet.

Tech Today: A NASA-Inspired Bike Helmet with Aerodynamics of a Jet  

blue glow emanates from a ring-like Hall-effect Thruster

Tech Today: NASA’s Ion Thruster Knowhow Keeps Satellites Flying

nasa 3d tour

NASA Selects Commercial Service Studies to Enable Mars Robotic Science

nasa 3d tour

Latest Join Artemis News and Features

The 2024 App Development Challenge top teams in front of the Orion Capsule in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

NASA Challenge Gives Artemis Generation Coders a Chance to Shine

2021 Astronaut Candidates Stand in Recognition

Diez maneras en que los estudiantes pueden prepararse para ser astronautas

Astronaut Marcos Berrios

Astronauta de la NASA Marcos Berríos

image of an experiment facility installed in the exterior of the space station

Resultados científicos revolucionarios en la estación espacial de 2023

Mike dicicco, science writer.

Jim Gentes wearing the Jiro Prolight bicycle helmet.

Before the U.S. Cycling Federation adopted a requirement for all bike racers to wear helmets in 1986, most people rode without one. The only helmet options at the time drew rider complaints for being too hot and heavy. But, with a bit inspiration from a NASA aircraft wing design used during World War II, more than 20,000 competitive biker racers would soon have a lighter-weight option to protect their heads. 

Jim Gentes, an industrial designer, and bicycling enthusiast developing an aerodynamic bike helmet, saw the new rule as an opportunity. He started Giro Sport Design Inc., now based in Irvine, California, to provide bike racers a speed and safety advantage. Then came the Giro Prolight, a lightweight racing helmet that was cool and aerodynamic, drawing upon a NASA-developed aircraft wing technology.

The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), NASA’s predecessor, developed the NACA 6-series airfoil during World War II to reduce drag in fighter aircraft. Raymond Hicks, an aerodynamicist at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley, helped Gentes adapt that wing design to improve airflow over the helmet, reducing drag. Compared with bareheaded racing, wind tunnel tests confirmed that the reduced drag could save one second in a little over half a mile.

To keep it lightweight, the Prolight used expanded polystyrene foam with a removable Lycra cover. Vents in the front and rear of the helmet let air flow through, using the vacuum created by the rear vents to pull air into the helmet. The vent design also smoothed airflow, reducing turbulence and drag.

In 1986, Gentes added a foam model called the Aerohead. The Hammerhead, a Prolight with a thin shell, came next, followed by the newer, streamlined Aerohead. When Gentes’ friend Greg LeMond won the 1989 Tour de France wearing the Aerohead, worldwide acclaim followed. 

Giro has changed hands several times since the 1980s and today, the brand continues to offer bike helmets and other sporting equipment and apparel. 

Related Terms

  • Technology Transfer

Explore More

nasa 3d tour

Tech Today: Stay Safe with Battery Testing for Space

NASA battery safety exams influence commercial product testing

nasa 3d tour

NASA Data Helps Beavers Build Back Streams

Discover related topics.

nasa 3d tour

Ames Research Center

nasa 3d tour

nasa 3d tour

NASA visualizes flight into supermassive black hole

NASA has created a visualization of what it would be like to fly through the event horizon of a black hole , the agency announced Tuesday.

The simulation was posted to YouTube and includes several videos: one in which an observer just misses the "point of no return," one in which the viewer plunges into the depths of the event horizon, explainer videos, and a 360-degree experience.

The black hole that appears in the simulation is "4.3 million times the mass of our Sun," according to NASA, making it the same mass as the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way galaxy.

“If you have the choice, you want to fall into a supermassive black hole,” said Jeremy Schnittman, an astrophysicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. “Stellar-mass black holes, which contain up to about 30 solar masses, possess much smaller event horizons and stronger tidal forces, which can rip apart approaching objects before they get to the horizon.”

The black hole is surrounded by a ring of light, known as the accretion disc, which represents material caught in the gravitational pull of the stellar phenomenon and that has been flattened into a disc. The material very slowly orbits the black hole and produces an optical illusion.

“People often ask about this, and simulating these difficult-to-imagine processes helps me connect the mathematics of relativity to actual consequences in the real universe,” Schnittman said. “So I simulated two different scenarios, one where a camera, a stand-in for a daring astronaut, just misses the event horizon and slingshots back out, and one where it crosses the boundary, sealing its fate.”

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

NASA said simulating the experience of falling into a supermassive black hole required 10 terabytes of data, which it says is equivalent to "half of the estimated text content in the Library of Congress." The process took about five days using NASA's computers — the agency estimated the same video produced on an average laptop would take more than 10 years of processing time.

Any object falling into a black hole would be subject to "spaghettification," in which the powerful gravitational forces of the stellar body stretch the form into a long strand until it eventually falls into the black hole's singularity, "where the laws of physics as we know them cease to operate."

NASA visualizes flight into supermassive black hole

IMAGES

  1. NASA’s 3-D Tour of the International Space Station

    nasa 3d tour

  2. NASA 3D Mars Tour

    nasa 3d tour

  3. Tour the Space Station in VR with This Amazing 3D, 360-Degree Video

    nasa 3d tour

  4. NASA Takes Space Fans On 3D Tour Of The ISS

    nasa 3d tour

  5. Explore NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory With the New Virtual Tour

    nasa 3d tour

  6. Narrated 3D tour of the International Space Station

    nasa 3d tour

VIDEO

  1. Expedition 69 Progress 85 Cargo Ship Docks to Space Station

  2. NASA MOON Future 3D Animation

  3. NASA: 3D NEW OFFICIAL MARS FOOTAGE, 2012 "EXPLORATION ROVER MISSION": CURIOSITY PICTURES

  4. NASA 3D Models

COMMENTS

  1. NASA/JPL Eyes

    NASA's Solar System Interactive (also known as the Orrery) is a live look at the solar system, its planets, moons, comets, and asteroids, as well as the real-time locations of dozens of NASA missions.

  2. Eyes

    NASA's Eyes is a suite of 3D visualization applications that allows everyone to explore and understand real NASA data and imagery in a fun and interactive way. The apps are all run inside a regular web browser, so any device with an internet connection and a browser can run them.

  3. NASA Interactives

    NASA Licenses 3D-Printable Superalloy to Benefit US Economy. ... Take a trip outside our solar system with guided tours in English and Spanish. Tour the Galaxy. Global Ice Viewer. Ice, which covers 10 percent of Earth's surface, is disappearing rapidly. ... our solar system, nearby asteroids, the universe, and the spacecraft exploring them with ...

  4. Experience Hubble's Universe in 3-D

    Some 15,000 galaxies from Hubble's deepest surveys stretchbillions of light-years across the universe in a 3-D sequence createdby STScI astronomers and visualizers. The view dissolves into acobweb that traces the universe's large-scale structure, the backbonefrom which galaxies were born. In addition to creating visualizations, STScI's ...

  5. Johnson Virtual Tours

    Ellington Field is the heart of Johnson Space Center's flying operations and is located about 15 miles south of downtown Houston. NASA's primary function at Ellington is the training of astronauts for spaceflight. The field is also a base for administrative, cargo transport and high-altitude aircraft, with many types of NASA aircraft at the ...

  6. Solar System Simulator

    I want the body to take up percent of the image width. Options (choose any) -orbits -extra brightness -show all spacecraft. The Solar System Simulator is a graphical engine which will produce simulated views of any body in the solar system from any point in space.

  7. Voyager

    Overview. The Cover. The Contents. The Making of. Galleries. Videos. Making of the Golden Record. Images on the Golden Record. Galleries of Images Voyager Took.

  8. NASA VR / 360 multimedia for Planetarium Shows and Informal Education

    From the Museum of Science, Boston, tour NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. From Lockheed Martin, see the loading of the ... see the Capcom Go 360 video and AR apps about the Apollo missions. From the Smithsonian, 360 images and a full 3D model of the Apollo 11 CM are a part of their full 3D printable collection. From the European Southern ...

  9. JPL

    The JPL Public Services Office offers a limited number of virtual tour experiences, free of charge. The virtual tour experiences are led online by JPL tour guides. Please see the below descriptions for additional information. Virtual Tour Experiences are booked one month at a time. Please note that we do not conduct virtual tour experiences on ...

  10. NASA's 3-D Tour of the International Space Station

    Description: During Expedition 31 in 2012, NASA astronaut Don Pettit used a 3-D camera to take viewers on a "floating" tour of the International Space Statio...

  11. Home

    NASA 3D Resources. Currently hosting 381 models. Welcome to the 3D Resources site!Here you'll find a growing collection of 3D models, textures, and images from inside NASA. All of these resources are free to download and use. Please read the Usage Guidelines .

  12. International Space Station Tour

    Station Tour: Zarya and Zvezda. Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams concludes her tour of the International Space Station with a visit to the Russian segment, which includes Zarya, the first segment of the station launched in 1998, and Zvezda, the central command post. She also takes a look at the Poisk and Rassvet modules where Soyuz ...

  13. Station Spacewalk Game

    In Station Spacewalk Game you'll experience the thrill of conducting NASA repair work on the International Space Station. After negotiating your way through the airlock, you, the astronaut, will be tasked with jobs critical to help power up the space station so it can continue to operate. First take your time to explore the station, but then it ...

  14. New NASA Black Hole Visualization Takes Viewers Beyond the Brink

    Tour an alternative visualization that tracks a camera as it approaches, falls toward, briefly orbits, and escapes a supermassive black hole. This immersive 360-degree version allows viewers to look around during the flight. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/J. Schnittman and B. Powell

  15. Tech Today: A NASA-Inspired Bike Helmet with Aerodynamics of a Jet

    NASA Licenses 3D-Printable Superalloy to Benefit US Economy. article 5 days ago. 7 min read. ARMD Solicitations ... streamlined Aerohead. When Gentes' friend Greg LeMond won the 1989 Tour de France wearing the Aerohead, worldwide acclaim followed. Giro has changed hands several times since the 1980s and today, the brand continues to offer ...

  16. NASA visualizes flight into supermassive black hole

    NASA has created a visualization of what it would be like to fly through the event horizon of a black hole, the agency announced Tuesday. The simulation was posted to YouTube and includes several ...