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Guide to Adaptive Cruise Control

How this convenience feature works to reduce your stress on long drives

Illustration of a car safety system

Adaptive cruise control (ACC) is like traditional cruise control, but smarter. ACC systems allow you to set a desired speed until your vehicle encounters slower-moving traffic. Then it will brake to maintain a set distance from the car ahead. Once the traffic starts moving again or if there is no longer a car in the lane ahead, ACC will accelerate to resume the previous set speed. Although ACC systems may take some getting used to, our survey respondents told us they appreciated the stress relief the feature brings.

“I use the feature mostly on the freeway and in stop-and-go traffic. I find it reduces tension and fatigue,” wrote a 2020 Subaru Outback owner. A 2018 Audi Q5 driver agreed. “It is so nice to just set it and let the car worry about the traffic,” they told CR.

The systems use lasers, radar, cameras, or a combination of those. If traffic slows to a stop, most ACC systems will bring the car to a complete stop, then bring it back up to speed when traffic gets going again. Others work only within certain speeds and/or might not start to accelerate automatically.

Adaptive cruise control (ACC): Cruise control that also assists with acceleration and/or braking to maintain a driver-selected gap to the vehicle in front. Some systems can come to a stop and continue while others cannot. If the car comes to a full stop, you may have to press the accelerator or a button on the steering wheel to start moving again.

Not all systems work at low speeds, so drivers who plan to use ACC in slow traffic should check the limitations of any system they plan to buy. These particular systems will often have the words “traffic jam” or “stop and go” in their name.

These features are usually activated using a button on the steering wheel with the image of a car next to a speedometer with an arrow pointing at it. A conventional cruise control system does not automatically keep a set distance away from the car in front, and it is indicated by a similar logo without the car next to the speedometer. A tip to know if your car has adaptive cruise control or regular cruise control is to look for the “gap distance” button, which usually shows a symbol of a car with horizontal distance bars in front. This button will determine how much space your car leaves between its front bumper and the rear of the car it is following.

In our most recent survey, we asked CR members to rate their experiences with the advanced safety and driver assistance systems on their model-year 2017 to 2022 cars. Respondents answered questions about their satisfaction with the systems. The survey covered about 47,000 vehicles. Most respondents told us they were “very satisfied” with ACC. Satisfaction was higher for older drivers.

OVERALL SATISFACTION

What to Look For in an Adaptive Cruise Control System

Every ACC system works slightly differently, says Kelly Funkhouser, manager for vehicle technology at CR. Some do a better job than others at recognizing merging traffic and automatically apply the brakes, while others wait too long to slow your car, requiring the driver to take control—especially when a vehicle in front of you cuts you off with a close merge.

“Most ACC systems can only be set to speeds above 20 mph but will slow the vehicle to speeds below that in stop-and-go traffic,” she says. “There are a few systems out there that don’t bring the car all the way to a stop but instead just shut off at low speeds. That can be dangerous when you’re traveling behind another slowing vehicle.” She recommends reading the automaker’s website closely and learning about the speed ranges before using ACC while on your test drive.

ACC is meant for convenience, not as a replacement for an alert driver, Funkhouser says. So don’t use adaptive cruise control as an excuse to get distracted. “Just because the car is controlling your speed doesn’t mean that you can check out,” she says. “These systems do not do well at detecting or slowing for vehicles ahead if you approach them at a high rate of speed. The driver should always be monitoring the surrounding traffic and looking ahead for potential hazards.”

Keith Barry

Keith Barry has been an auto reporter at Consumer Reports since 2018. He focuses on safety, technology, and the environmental impact of cars. Previously, he led home and appliance coverage at Reviewed; reported on cars for USA Today, Wired, and Car & Driver; and wrote for other publications as well. Keith earned a master’s degree in public health from Tufts University. Follow him on Twitter @itskeithbarry .

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Adding Aftermarket Cruise Control Is Easier Than You Think

add on active cruise control

If you’re an auto enthusiast, you probably take pleasure in the response from stomping the gas pedal. But c’mon folks, we can also admit that a long highway trip is more pleasant with cruise control. Set a constant speed, lift your foot, and let the car glide down the pike.

But what if your vehicle didn’t come with cruise control? No worries. There are plenty of aftermarket kits to add cruise control to your ride. If you have some basic skills, this DIY upgrade can happen in an hour or two.

Shop now for cruise control kits

eBay Motors offers hundreds of aftermarket cruise control kits and related parts. But before you make a purchase, answer these questions:

  • Is the aftermarket cruise control kit compatible with your car?
  • Are your brake lights working properly?
  • Are you comfortable working on your car’s electrical wiring and throttle settings?

An installation kit should be designed specifically for your vehicle and include all the necessary gear.

An eBay search could turn up a usable original New Old Stock (NOS) kit from the carmaker.

If you answered yes (or you’re willing to learn), then cruise control might be coming soon to your vehicle. And if you think this is beyond your skill set, most auto shops can install a kit for you.

Watch the installation of a Rostra cruise control system in a Hyundai Accent:

Tips for Installing Aftermarket Cruise Control

Here’s a quick overview of the primary components. Kits will provide detailed instructions. First things first: safety! Before starting to work on your car’s electrical system, disconnect the battery.

Wiring harness: Most kits come with a wiring harness, complete with colored wires. Instructions will guide you to wire the hot and cold sides of your brake switch. Other wires connect to the ignition “run” contact and ground. A significant step is to splice into a Vehicle Speed Signal (VSS) wire. Most cars of the past 20 years have a VSS. If not, there are adapter kits to create a signal generator or use a pick-up coil to create a similar signal.

Kits often integrate with a drive-by-wire system.

Kits often integrate with a drive-by-wire system.

Throttle cable: Attach the cable provided in the kit to the existing throttle plate of your car’s engine. Most kits also have sufficient adapters and linkages to fit a variety of throttles. Verify that the cable is not binding on anything under the hood. Aftermarket cruise control kits can also accommodate newer engines that drive by wire—and don’t have an old-school cable to control engine RPMs.

Actuator: The actuator is a mechanical box that controls your car’s cruising function. It is mounted in the engine compartment and has connectors for the wiring harness and throttle cable. It also has several DIP (dual inline package) switches. Moving specific DIP switches up or down allows the cruise control unit to communicate with essential vehicle functions. The settings include the number of engine cylinders, the type of speed sensor, and its output. To save the new settings, power off the actuator and then restore power.

A dash-mounted controller activates cruise control.

A cruise control switch integrates with the turn signal lever.

Driver switch: Many cruise control systems offer a switch on your turn signal stalk that looks like a factory installation. Others provide buttons on a dash-mounted plate. We recommend the turn signal switch, which has a cleaner look and helps keep your eyes on the road.

Testing Required

Kits are designed for specifically vehicles and provide all the necessary gear.

Kits are designed for specifically vehicles and provide all the necessary gear.

After completing all the steps stipulated in the kit instructions:

  • Re-connect the battery.
  • Check to verify that your brake lights still function correctly.
  • Start the engine, leave it in Park, and mildly depress the gas pedal.
  • Make sure that it returns to a slow idle setting.

A dash-mounted controller activates cruise control.

A dash-mounted controller activates cruise control.

If the brake lights and idle are working as expected, it’s time to take the car to a deserted parking lot. Next, accelerate to a moderate speed, set the cruise control, and see if the speed is maintained with your foot off the gas pedal. Finally, touch the brake pedal and verify that the cruise control disengages.

If everything is working, your car should be ready for further testing on the highway. It’s a good idea to take several short, local highway trips to verify a successful installation before heading off on a long interstate journey.

While aftermarket cruise control is available to hands-on DIYers, that’s not yet mainstream for so-called adaptive cruise control. But automated road sensing and even lane-keeping is probably not far off. For example, an aftermarket self-driving kit from Comma.ai is usually available on eBay .

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About the Author

Mark C. Bach has oil in his veins and remembers feeler gauges and brake springs. He has a love for all things that move, especially old-school muscle cars. Bach writes for a variety of outlets, including Chevy Classics and FuelCurve.com, and maintains Route66pubco.com.

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Adaptive Cruise Control: What is ACC in ADAS?

  • June 3, 2021

adaptive cruise control switch

Table of Contents

What is ACC in ADAS?

When it comes to cars, ACC stands for Adaptive Cruise Control. In a Consumer Reports survey , 85 percent of drivers with Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) on their vehicles said they were very satisfied with it. What’s more, 19 percent said their ACC system helped to avoid a crash.

Standard cruise control has been around since the 1950s . Adaptive cruise control has been in development since the 1990s . Mercedes was the first automaker to bring ACC to the U.S. market in 1999 . Twenty years later, automakers are still working to improve their cruise control offerings. In the meantime, ACC technology has become one of the building blocks of autonomous driving.

In this article, we will explain adaptive cruise control and how it works, provide examples of ACC features in ADAS packages, and explain the importance of adaptive cruise control calibration.

What is Adaptive Cruise Control?

Adaptive cruise control or Active Cruise Control (ACC) is an advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) that automatically adjusts a vehicle’s speed when there are slow-moving vehicles ahead, with the aim of maintaining a safe following distance. When the road ahead is clear, ACC automatically accelerates to your pre-set speed. Adaptive cruise control is ideal for highway speeds.

ACC is a major component and precursor of fully autonomous vehicles. According to SAE , Driving Automation Level 1 driver support features provide steering OR brake/acceleration to the driver while the jump to Level 2 requires features that provide both steering AND brake/acceleration to the driver. On its own, ACC is a Level 1, but when combined with another driver assist feature that steers, your vehicle reaches Level 2 on the Driving Automation scale – a step closer to fully autonomous driving .

As a foundation of autonomous driving, ACC has the capability of reducing driver stress and radically improving driver safety. A study from the Highway Loss Data Institute studied insurance claims data from 2013-2017 BMW vehicles to see how ADAS affected collision, damage, and injury rates. The BMW Driving Assistance package added ACC to the following ADAS: Forward Collision Warning , Lane Departure Warning , Front Automatic Emergency Braking . With the addition of ACC, this package reduced the rates of property damage by 27 percent and bodily injury claim rates by 37 percent.

How does Adaptive Cruise Control work?

Just as with traditional cruise control, the adaptive cruise control system requires drivers to choose their preferred speed. Next, ACC requires drivers to set their preferred following distance from the vehicle’s pre-set options. Many have close, medium, and far selections to toggle between.

Sensors Used in Adaptive Cruise Control

Vehicles with adaptive cruise control use ACC sensor data to tell your car’s speed, distance from other vehicles, and the speed of vehicles ahead of you. There are many types of adaptive cruise control technology. The following types of sensors have all been used for ACC:

  • Laser (Lidar)

Most (but not all) current forms of this ADAS use radar as their main source of information. A radar sensor mounted in the front of the vehicle is used to analyze the road ahead. It does this by emitting radio waves and measuring how long they take to return to the ACC sensor. A few internal calculations and your vehicle can tell the car’s distance and speed. Data from the radar distance sensors and the vehicle speed sensors are used to adjust your speed and keep your car a set distance from the one ahead of you.

ACC System Versions and Commonly Bundled ADAS

Most automakers have their own version of adaptive cruise control. Not everyone uses the same names for their ACC system. Here are a few industry terms that are all different names for ACC:

  • Dynamic cruise control
  • Intelligent cruise control
  • Radar cruise control
  • Radar adaptive cruise control
  • Dynamic laser cruise control
  • Autonomous cruise control
  • Smart cruise control
  • Dynamic radar cruise control

ACC with Stop & Go, Traffic Jam

Beyond the similar naming, there are several different features that adaptive cruise control is often bundled with to provide sensor fusion. One example of this is a feature called ACC with Stop and Go or ACC with Traffic Jam Assist. This adds the ability to come to a complete stop via automatic braking and then re-accelerate to the car’s set speed as traffic moves. All the while, data from sensors is used to keep a set, safe distance from cars ahead when you encounter heavy traffic.

Because it’s not an autonomous car, those with stop and go capabilities will only “go” again within three seconds if traffic flow allows. If it’s longer than three seconds, driver action is needed to re-engage the system.

ACC + Forward Collision Warning & Automatic Braking

Forward Collision Warning and Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB) advanced driver assistance systems are often combined with ACC to provide audible alerts, instrument panel alerts, and tactile warnings of a forward collision risk, then automatic braking to prevent or mitigate damage from a collision.

ACC + Lane Centering

Adaptive Cruise Control works well with others. As previously mentioned, when adaptive cruise control is combined with an ADAS with steering capabilities like lane centering and proactive lane keeping assist systems, your car is considered a Level 2 on the SAE autonomous driving scale — meaning that the vehicle can accelerate, decelerate, and steer on its own — under very specific conditions, including initiation speed and weather. While it’s a step up in terms of driving automation, for safety, a human driver is still required to supervise constantly, including steering, braking, or accelerating.

ACC + GPS or Traffic Sign Recognition

Some ACC systems offer advanced traffic sign recognition , while others utilize GPS speed limit data. These optional ACC features help to combat the use of ACC technology to speed.

4 Examples of Adaptive Cruise Control

There are many different flavors of ACC. Names, tech, and bundled features make the automotive landscape — dotted with endless features, diverse names, and function variations — a bit tricky to navigate. To help you recognize ACC features, here are four automaker examples.

Ford Adaptive Cruise Control

Ford is one example of an automaker with adaptive cruise control. Here’s how Ford’s describes its system and capabilities:

“Available on select Ford vehicles is a series of Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) features employing advanced radar and camera technology. ACC lets you set a cruising speed and distance from the vehicle ahead of you. When it slows down, you automatically do too; when traffic picks back up, you resume your preset speed and distance. Then comes ACC with Stop-and-Go, which enables you to come to a complete stop when the vehicle ahead stops. Now add Lane Centering, which scans the lane markings to help you stay in your lane if the system detects you’re drifting out of it. And that’s not all. Now there’s Intelligent Adaptive Cruise Control, which includes all of these features plus new Speed Sign Recognition that can automatically adjust the set speed of your vehicle to the posted speed limit.”

Honda Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) with Low-Speed Follow

In the Honda Sensing ADAS package, the automaker offers ACC on many 2021 models with what it calls Low Speed Follow. Here’s how Honda describes it :

“Cruising on the open highway has never been easier! Honda’s Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) with Low-Speed Follow lets you set your cruise speed and interval behind a vehicle detected ahead, and then maintains that interval by braking your vehicle or applying the throttle.  And the Low-Speed Follow function can bring your vehicle to a complete stop when a vehicle detected ahead slows to a stop, and it lets you resume operation by pressing a button or the accelerator.”

Hyundai Smart Cruise control (SCC) with Stop & Go

Hyundai offers adaptive cruise control, including on the Santa Fe. Here’s how the automaker describes it :

“While traveling at a speed set by you, it uses radar to maintain a safe distance from the car ahead. When the system slows the vehicle to a stop, it will reactivate if the vehicle in front moves within 3 seconds.”

Hyundai also offers Highway Driving Assist that works together with Smart Cruise Control. Here’s how Hyundai describes this feature :

“Your “co-pilot” for highway driving, when actively engaged with Smart Cruise Control or Lane Following Assist, this smart convenience automatically helps keep you centered in your lane and traveling at a safe distance behind the car ahead. Not only that, it also can keep you driving at the right speeds, automatically setting your pace based on GPS and highway data.”

Subaru EyeSight Adaptive Cruise Control

As part of Subaru’s Eyesight Driver Assist Technology Package, ACC is standard on many of the brand’s 2021 models and optional on the rest. It uses dual forward-facing color cameras mounted near the rearview mirror. Here’s how Subaru describes its ACC system in a promotional video :

“With adaptive cruise control, eyesight can help you stay with the flow of traffic. When you set cruise control, you can select from up to four present following distances. EyeSight watches ahead and if it detects traffic is slowing, adaptive cruise control adjusts your speed accordingly to keep your selected distance. Once traffic starts moving faster, it can automatically accelerate back up to your set speed. It can even work in stop-and-go traffic.

For some, it’s less worry about adjusting cruise control. For others, it’s like having an extra set of eyes on the road.”

Adaptive Cruise Control Limitations

Drivers should know that they are responsible for what happens when they are behind the wheel. Every company makes sure to include an asterisk and notice that drivers are still needing to be actively engaged in driving. Some drivers are using ACC to speed . A study of 40 drivers by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) found that they were more likely to speed when equipped with ACC.

ACC works well in clear day and night driving, and in light weather. However, if there is fog, heavy rain, or snow, it won’t work. Additionally, if dirt, snow, or ice are on the sensors, they won’t work. ACC also has trouble on winding roads.

With or without ACC, it’s important to always leave more space during poor driving conditions, including inclement weather.

Adaptive Cruise Control Calibration

ACC is one of the most common ADAS features in vehicles today. Like other ADAS systems, ACC needs to have sensors recalibrated after a collision and many vehicle services like windshield replacement . ADAS calibration keeps ACC systems working properly.

What is adaptive cruise control calibration?

Adaptive Cruise Control calibration takes place when the camera, lidar, and radar sensors that inform your vehicle’s actions are re-aligned to improve or re-establish sensor accuracy.

Getting a car calibrated takes drivers knowing about it and recognizing the warning signs.

ACC Calibration Warnings for Drivers

For drivers, the biggest sign that you need a car calibration is a recent collision. Other circumstances that necessitate Adaptive Cruise Control calibration include any time you repair or replace something nearby the location of a sensor. Another sign would be an overly sensitive ACC system, even when you have changed the settings (where possible). Here are some related warning messages that may signal it’s time to get an ADAS calibration:

  • Adaptive cruise control sensor blocked
  • Adaptive cruise control failure
  • Adaptive cruise control temporarily unavailable

ADAS Calibration for Auto Shops

When a car comes into the shop, techs need to know when to order or perform ADAS calibrations . They also need to understand their importance. If calibrated incorrectly, ACC systems may have following distance settings that drivers aren’t used to. They can also make the systems overly sensitive, or not sensitive enough.

Every new model year brings more and more ADAS-equipped vehicles to the streets. Cars need to be calibrated after collisions, and any repairs that may affect sensor alignment. If you want to capitalize on this impending influx of needed calibrations, Car ADAS Solutions can help. We are at the forefront of the ADAS calibration services industry. We provide turnkey ADAS calibration solutions with framework, specialty software, training, and support, built-in. Contact Car ADAS Solutions today !

Additional ACC Resources:

  • Cars with Adaptive Cruise Control – Car and Driver
  • 10 Best Cars with Adaptive Cruise Control – TrueCar
  • Adaptive Cruise Control – MyCarDoesWhat.org

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Cars with Adaptive Cruise Control: Everything You Need to Know

Cars with adaptive cruise control used to be considered a luxury only featured in state-of-the-art vehicles. Still, with technological advancements, adaptive cruise control is now a common feature found in many different car models.

Cruise control buttons on modern car and speed limitation

Cars with adaptive cruise control used to be considered a luxury only featured in state-of-the-art vehicles. Still, with technological advancements, adaptive cruise control is now a common feature found in many different car models. Autobytel says this means ACC is now accessible to everyone, and even if your current vehicle doesn't have ACC, you can always have it installed.

What Does Adaptive Cruise Control Do?

Adaptive cruise control uses advanced sensory technology to determine your car's speed in proximity to other vehicles or objects on or around the roadway. It applies moderate brakes and warning signals when a driver is getting to close to another car. Drivers can set the speed limit on the ACC so that they don't exceed the speed limit, but when the sensory technology detects traffic or other unsafe conditions, it reduces the driver's speed to adapt to them.

The Best Cars With Adaptive Cruise Control

1. 2020 bmw 3 series.

This brand new model offers the best combination of sensory technology . It uses cameras in addition to ultrasonic and radar sensors to pull data about the environment surrounding the vehicle. In addition to its sensory features, it also has a "stop-and-go" brake feature, great for commuters who spend extended amounts of time in stand-still traffic as it alleviates the stress on the driver's legs and feet. What's more, the camera sensor can pick up traffic signs such as speed limit signs and reduce or increase speed to match the recommended rate of speed.

2. 2020 Volvo S60

This new model by Volvo has a "Pilot Assist" feature, which makes driving safe and easy. What this feature does is it helps the driver maintain the proper speed with neighboring vehicles, and it also provides steering assistance along with automatic braking or accelerating for situations such as stop-and-go to free-flowing traffic. Another great aspect of this model is that it doesn't rely on a lead car to determine speed and spacing, so you can use it even when you aren't near another car.

3. 2020 Hyundai Sonata

This new Hyundai model has the same technological systems as other Hyundai models, called "SmartSense advanced driving assistance systems." The 2020 Hyundai Sonata includes SmartSense features such as five cameras, three radar sensors, and 12 ultrasonic sensors to help with things such as advanced cruise control, stop-and-go feature, warning signals, and automatic braking or accelerating.

4. 2020 Nissan Altima

The 2020 Nissan Altima features Nissan's "ProPilot Assist" system, which uses advanced technology to help drivers practice safe driving. It allows drivers with automatic acceleration and braking for speed and distance control, while it also uses automatic steering to help them maintain lane control. These helpful features are made possible by its front-facing cameras, sensors, radar, and electronic control module.

5. 2020 Toyota Corolla Hatchback

This new model provides drivers with an adaptive cruise control system, specifically designed for highway travel. Its cruise control features include cameras within the car and radar sensors on the front grille that can gauge your car's proximity and speed when compared to other vehicles around you. Similarly, these sensors help determine the rate of speed of the vehicle in front of you and automatically decrease your speed if the vehicle in front of you slows down.

The Cheapest Cars With Adaptive Cruise Control

According to U.S.News, here are some examples of the cheapest cars you can buy that still have adaptive cruise control features:

1. 2019 Kia Soul

You can get Kia's "smart cruise control" feature as part of their "Primo Package." This add-on is around $4,500 in addition to the original selling-price. You can save energy with its automatic braking system, and also keep a safe following distance thanks to its forward-collision warning feature. In addition to these safety features, the Kia Soul also provides drivers with a heated steering wheel, and in-depth seat adjustments to meet more complex needs for your body type.

2. 2018 Mazda 3

The 2018 Mazda 3 provides drivers with an adaptive cruise control system that detects rear-cross traffic and blind-spot monitoring, great for making safe lane changes. It also offers a "premium equipment package" for just $1,600 in addition to the original selling price. This package gives your vehicle advanced safety features and other add-ons such as a heated steering wheel and a built-in navigation system.

3. 2018 Hyundai Sonata

The 2018 Hyundai Sonata offers buyers the "technology package" for just $1,000. Included in this package are adaptive cruise control to help drivers maintain a safe following distance and adequate speed. This model also comes with a turbocharged four-cylinder engine.

4. 2018 Toyota Rav4

This 2018 Toyota Rav4 SUV includes an adaptive cruise control system for a fee that increases the original selling price to just above $25,000. When you turn your ACC feature on, it uses its radar sensors to administer collision warnings, automatic braking, and acceleration to make sure that your vehicle moves at a safe pace and maintains an appropriate following distance from other vehicles on the roadway at all times.

The 2018 Toyota Rav4's adaptive cruise control system is categorized as "standard equipment" in Toyota's "Safety Sense P suite of technology," Making it a high-tech safety vehicle for a reasonable price point.

5. 2018 Honda Accord

The 2018 Honda Accord features a state-of-the-art adaptive cruise control system called the "Honda Sensing System." This system offers not only adaptive cruise control but also several other useful safety features, including automatic braking for collision prevention and traffic sign recognition.

These features are powered by camera sensing technology that can read traffic signs such as speed limit markers and adjust the Accord's speed to fit those speed requirements. You can get even more safety features by upgrading to higher-trims.

As adaptive cruise control becomes more readily available, you can find cheap and affordable car models that include much of the same technology as modern luxury cars.

https://www.autobytel.com/car-buying-guides/features/10-cars-with-adaptive-cruise-control-131148/

https://cars.usnews.com/cars-trucks/cheapest-cars-with-adaptive-cruise-control

https://www.caranddriver.com/bmw

https://www.caranddriver.com/shopping-advice/

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Active Cruise Control explained

Lachlan Wornes

More and more cars are coming out with Active Cruise Control, but what is it and how does it work?

BY WAY OF background, Cruise Control, as opposed to Active Cruise Control, (ACC) has been around since the 1960s and is now, more or less, a standard feature on all new cars, including trucks, tractors and even large “Cruiser” type motorcycles.

The normal cruise control we’re all used to allows a driver to set a speed and then the car will maintain that speed without the driver needing to touch the accelerator pedal. Then when the driver needs to adjust the speed, they can either do so via the cruise control stalk and/or buttons on the steering wheel, depending on the make and model of vehicle. The driver can also deactivate cruise control via the brake pedal, or momentarily increase the speed, say, when overtaking, by pressing the accelerator pedal. Cruise Control may return to the preset speed if you have deactivated it by pressing the accelerator, but will always disengage entirely if you have used the brakes or changed gear in a manual.  Check your car’s owner manual for confirmation of that function on your car.

Older cruise control systems simply used the throttle, so would let the car speed up beyond the target speed on downhills.  Newer systems use the brakes and even gears to properly maintain the target speed up or down hill. 

Now cruise control has evolved to being able to adjust its speed based on the speed of the vehicle in front. Often used interchangeably, Active Cruise Control and Adaptive Cruise Control are one and the same – as usual manufacturers like to invent different names for the same technology. At least they’re both abbreviated to ACC!

What is Active Cruise Control?

Well, it works in similar way to your regular cruise control.  The driver brings the car to their desired speed and presses the set button, then the car maintains that speed. The ‘active’ part is that your car will slow down if your car detects another car in front travelling more slowly.  That’s perfect for freeway driving, particularly in traffic, and longer trips. The Active component of Active Cruise Control comes in the form of a RADAR or LIDAR sensor (depending on your manufacturer’s choice of technology) in the front of the car.  This sensor allows you to set the distance you want to follow the car in front, normally measured in time, typically 2, 3 or 4 seconds.  

For instance, let’s say that you have your ACC set at 105km/h and a slower vehicle pulls out in front of you further up the road doing a mere 90km/h.  ACC is designed to pick this up and slow your vehicle down to match the speed of that vehicle, and follow at the distance that you have set.  When that vehicle moves out of your lane, and there are no other cars in front of you, your car resumes your original 105km/h.  It does all this without any throttle or brake inputs from you. But the system isn’t perfect, and we’ve got more on that below…

So, is ACC helpful?

Yes.  Active Cruise Control was designed with high-volume commuter traffic in mind.  Where speeds are constantly changing from 100km/h to a dead stop with not much warning.  It only takes one driver not paying attention for 1-2 seconds for an accident to happen.  Boredom, fatigue and in-car distractions are the biggest cause of accidents on the roads today.

How much does ACC cost?

When this sort of radar technology first appeared it was as a $1500 cost option on the $220,000+ 1999-model Mercedes-Benz S-Class .  Today, the average price point of cars with this type of feature as standard is approximately $60,000, so a lot of cars above that price point will feature ACC as standard, primarily European and Asian cars.  The great news is that this type of technology is becoming a priority to more manufacturers, who are making it available in more affordable cars.  Mazda have it as standard in both their top spec Mazda6 Atenza ($48,510+ORC) and Mazda3 Astina ($38,190+ORC), though it can’t be cost-optioned in lower models.

Subaru offer it as standard equipment on the top-spec Forrester and Outback models, and all of the Liberty range.  The latter are the only vehicles in Australia that offer the feature in a sub-$30K car ($29,990+ORC).  Interestingly Subaru are one of the few manufacturers that don’t use radar technology for this feature.  Instead they use an optical system called Eyesight based on stereoscopic cameras placed on either side of the rear view mirror.

On the flip side you can still spend $95,000-plus on an HSV GTS and not be able to access this type of technology.

Is it a tick box on the option list?

Not necessarily.  ACC will usually be part of a suite of safety features that some manufacturers refer to as ‘Forward Collision Warning’.  These systems are always active and commonly include, lane departure warnings, lane departure assist, brake assist, pedestrian detection and so on.  Because all these systems use primarily the same radar, laser or camera system (in some cases, a combination) as the ACC, they will be combined and marketed as a whole safety system depending on the manufacturer and the vehicle.

Do all ACC systems work the same?

No.  There are a lot of variations between manufacturers and even differences from model to model under the same marque.  Some ACC systems only work between 40km/h and145km/h and others can be active from stop all the way to 250km/h, requiring a touch of the accelerator to get going again if it does happen to bring you to a stop.  None should be fully trusted.

Heavy rain, fog and snow can interfere with the capabilities of these systems, and heading into the sun can throw out the camera-based systems.  Windy roads and cars that dive in to gaps in front of you can confuse the ACC which may not react in time.  The ACC may not detect long overhanging loads on trucks, or narrow vehicles like motorcycles.  It is critical to understand the limitations of the system and be sure that you are only using these systems as a back up to your own driving.  Don’t think it’s a set and forget kind of thing; you must still be paying attention to what’s happening around you.  

Remember your set speed too.  You might have set it for 100km/h and then spent many minutes in traffic below 50.  All of a sudden once the road is clear the car will accelerate… and that might take you by surprise.  But overall, ACC is very useful because it means you don’t need to fiddle with the cruise control when driving in heavy traffic on freeways. 

If you do own or buy a car with this feature, make sure you take some to get a feel for how it works. If you’re like me, the sensation of something else controlling the car that you’re driving will be weird for the first few times. 

Is it a Gimmick? 

No, it’s genuinely useful, which is not something we can say all of the latest driver aids.  With every new model release, more and more of this technology is being introduced. Fully automated vehicles are already being tested in different parts of the world and what we are seeing in the market place today, are the trickle down effects from that innovation.  

With tech giants Apple and Google investing heavily in this type of automation for cars, the days of drumming along on your steering wheel (Google’s automated prototype was revealed without a steering wheel, but court rulings have dictated it be set-up for manual control) to your favourite song are numbered. Shame.

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Škoda Octavia 2016 ,considerably cheaper than$30k, comes with ACC as standard equipment. Probably standard on the whole Skoda range.

Lachlan Wornes

Lachlan Wornes

Whether it is trying to name a car just from its exhaust note, to being able to identify it from only a partial view of a tail light, Lachlan always finds himself wanting to know more without ever having to make a conscious effort to do so. He loves to look at them, listen to them and talk about them. Somehow driving them always makes him feel excited and relaxed at the same time. Growing up in rural Victoria made for some very liberal driving experiences from a very young age, which may have something to do with the passion that still exists. After spending all his 20’s in the snow fields of North America, the 9-5, 40hr work week never really suited him. After a brief stints with Road Magazine in the UK, and Jalopnik in the US, he has found his way back home to do what he loves, where he loves to be.

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Volkswagen Cars w/ Adaptive Cruise Control (All 11 Models)

Adaptive cruise control has been available mostly in luxury vehicles but is now common in many mainstream cars, including Volkswagens.

The Volkswagen cars, SUVs, and EVs in this post have adaptive cruise control or conventional cruise control system.

Check the corresponding tables to see the relevant model years when the system became available.

volkswagen

Adaptive Cruise Control vs. Cruise Control

The more-basic cruise control in older Volkswagen cars helps the vehicle maintain a steady cruising speed.

Adaptive cruise control (ACC) enhances the conventional cruise control system by adjusting the car’s speed to match the vehicle ahead, slowing or accelerating to the set speed when appropriate.

Newer Volkswagens have the IQ Drive technology that automatically maintains a set distance from the vehicle ahead, with the ability to brake on its own to avoid a potential collision.

Rival mainstream car makers that produce popular models with adaptive cruise control (ACC) include:

  • Toyota vehicles with ACC .
  • Kia vehicles with ACC .
  • Honda vehicles with ACC .
  • Hyundai vehicles with ACC .
  • Nissan vehicles with ACC .
  • Ford vehicles with ACC .

Volkswagen Cars with Adaptive Cruise Control

#1 volkswagen golf.

Although it’s no longer in production after 2021, the Golf hatchback remains a compelling purchase as a used car, with its excellent ride quality and versatile body – even the more-powerful Golf R is a competent daily driver .

All Volkswagen Golf models from 2003 to 2021 had standard cruise control that enabled a steady highway cruising speed.

Only in 2002 when the system first became available was cruise control not available at all trim levels.

#2 Volkswagen Polo

Although the VW Polo isn’t available on American shores, it’s a popular little car sold globally in Europe and many other countries.

Except for the latest generation that debuted in 2022, Volkwagen Polos from 2009 to 2021 had cruise control in the pricier variants, and all pre-2009 models only had the system as an optional add-on.

#3 Volkswagen Beetle

The discontinued Volkswagen Beetle had cruise control as a standard provision from 2012 to 2019.

#4 Volkswagen Jetta

In a class with all-stars like Honda Civic , Toyota Corolla , Hyundai Elantra , and Kia Forte – all with adaptive cruise control – the VW Jetta seems somewhat mediocre.

Still, from 2019 onwards, Volkswagen Jettas have had adaptive cruise control (ACC) in their higher trims and the more-basic cruise control in the lower ones.

Cruise control is standard across all Volkswagen Jettas from 2003 to 2018, with the 2001 and 2002 models only having the system in the more-expensive trims.

#5 Volkswagen Passat

2021 and 2022 Volkswagen Passat sedans have standard adaptive cruise control, while models from 2016 to 2020 only had the system in the higher trims.

Cruise control is standard across all Volkswagen Passat from 2001 to 2015, and older models before that period do not have the cruise management system.

2022 marks this midsize car’s final model year stateside.

#6 Volkswagen Arteon

This 2019 debutant is a unique large hatchback with sleek styling and sporty handling.

All Volkswagen Arteon models have at least the basic cruise control system, with the higher trims carrying the more-sophisticated adaptive cruise control (ACC) before ACC became standard from 2022 onwards.

Volkswagen SUVs with Adaptive Cruise Control

#7 volkswagen taos.

Since its introduction in 2022, the Volkswagen Taos subcompact SUV has had adaptive cruise control in the upper trims and cruise control in the lower ones.

#8 Volkswagen Tiguan

This model stands out among small SUVs with its three rows of seats.

Volkswagen Tiguans from 2018 onwards have had adaptive cruise control or cruise control, depending on the trim level.

All VW Tiguan models from 2009 to 2017 had standard cruise control.

#9 Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport

This SUV is a two-row version of the VW Atlas.

Since its 2020 debut, the Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport has had adaptive cruise control in the upper trims and conventional cruise control in the lower ones.

#10 Volkswagen Atlas

This SUV is a three-row midsize, seating up to seven.

Like the two-row variant, the Volkswagen Atlas with an extra row of seats has cruise control in the base trim and the more sophisticated adaptive cruise control in the costlier ones.

Volkswagen Electric Vehicle with Adaptive Cruise Control

#11 volkswagen id.4.

As the German marque’s pioneering electric SUV, Volkswagen ID.4 models have adaptive cruise control with lane centering across all trim levels.

References:

https://www.vw.com/en/models.html

https://www.vw.com/en/iq-drive.html

Customer Viewpoint Ratings and Reviews

Who leaves ratings and reviews?

Ratings and reviews are provided by customers who have either purchased a vehicle or visited a dealership for service.

How are ratings and reviews collected?

Customers are invited to participate in a survey administered by MaritzCX, an independent, third-party supplier.

Can dealerships edit or remove reviews?

No. Ford personnel and/or dealership personnel cannot modify or remove reviews.

Are reviews modified or monitored before being published?

MaritzCX moderates public reviews to ensure they contain content that meet Review guidelines, such as:

‣No Profanity or inappropriate defamatory remarks

‣No Personal Identifying information (e.g., customer phone number or email)

‣No Competitor references (e.g., another brand or dealership)

‣Dangerous behavior (e.g. threatening to harm employees or others)

‣Lack of adequate text (e.g., symbols, emoji’s and random letters)

Reviews on the product and not the customer’s Sales or Service experience

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How do I use Ford Adaptive Cruise Control * ?

Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) lets you set a cruising speed and distance from the vehicle ahead of you. When it slows down, you automatically do too. When traffic picks back up, you resume your preset speed and distance. 

Watch the video or read the instructions below to learn how to use this feature.

Choosing an Adaptive Cruise Control Mode

  • Select  Driver Assist on your instrument cluster   using the five-way steering wheel controls ** .
  • Select  Cruise Control.

Choose  Adaptive  to enable Adaptive Cruise Control.

Note : To use conventional cruise control, choose  Normal † .

Setting the Adaptive Cruise Control Speed

  • Press  ON  on the cruise control switch on your steering wheel.
  • Drive at your desired speed.
  • Press and release the  SET+  button.
  • Take your foot off the accelerator.

add on active cruise control

Additional Information

What is Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop-and-Go? What is Intelligent Adaptive Cruise Control? What is Lane Centering?

* Driver-assist features are supplemental and do not replace the driver’s attention, judgment, and need to control the vehicle. See your  Owner’s Manual  for details and limitations.

** Location and appearance of buttons may vary. See your Owner's Manual  for information specific to your vehicle.

† Normal Cruise Control will not brake when your vehicle is approaching slower vehicles. Always be aware of which mode you have selected and apply brakes when necessary.

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BMW Releases Details on Active Cruise Control System

Dennis Chung

BMW released details about its new Active Cruise Control system, its version of Bosch’s Adaptive Cruise Control technology. Whatever the name, the system uses radar sensors to detect objects ahead of a motorcycle and adjusts the cruising speed to maintain a safe distance.

Our own Ryan Adams got a first-hand look at Bosch’s system in 2018, and both KTM and Ducati have announced plans to introduce the technology into their motorcycles as early as the 2021 model year, but BMW is the first to go into detail about how it will work.

bmw releases details on active cruise control system, BMW s active cruise control system controls are located on the left handlebar s switchgear The distance selector allows riders to set the preferred separation space ahead The distance function can also be deactivated turning system into a regular non active cruise control system

With its active system, riders will be able to set both a cruising speed and a distance ahead of the motorcycle. As long as the area within that range ahead of the motorcycle is clear, the cruise control system will maintain the set speed.

The Set/Res button selects the current riding speed for the cruise control. Pressing it forward again increases it by 1 mph (with a short press) or 5 mph (with a longer press). Holding the button down longer increases the set speed by 5 mph until it is released. Pressing the button to the rear reduces the speed. Pressing the distance button toggles between three settings: short, medium or long.

As with regular cruise control systems, riders can override the speed by twisting the throttle. Cruise control can be turned off by braking or turning the throttle grip forward past its resting position. Applying the clutch interrupts the cruise control for 1.5 seconds. BMW’s system has two modes, comfortable and dynamic, affecting how aggressively the system accelerates or decelerates.

bmw releases details on active cruise control system

If the radar sensors detect something ahead within that set distance, the cruise control system reduces the speed until it regains the set separation distance. The radar sensor ignores stationary objects and only reacts to moving objects. Riders will still need to be manually in control when, for example, stopping at a traffic light or during traffic jams.

bmw releases details on active cruise control system, Unlike other electronic hardware such as six axis EMUs or ABS modules the radar sensor needs to be near the front of a motorcycle and not tucked away within the bodywork

The sensor takes into account the motorcycle’s speed and yaw rate, predicting a path of travel through the next 100 meters to determine whether another vehicle is encroaching in the set distance. A distance controller sends a target acceleration (either positive for acceleration or negative for deceleration) via a CAN bus connection to the ABS and cruise control system. The ABS calculates the amount of drive torque from the engine and braking torque (if required) to adjust the speed.

bmw releases details on active cruise control system

Active Cruise Control also works when passing another vehicle. Using the turn indicator activates the system’s overtaking assistant function, preparing it to switch from the vehicle being passed to vehicles in the new lane.

BMW says its Active Cruise Control works in corners, but limits the speed to maintain a limited lean angle for comfortable turning (BMW lists 20 degrees as an example). The system will also limit any abrupt braking or acceleration maneuvers.

bmw releases details on active cruise control system

The radar sensor also serves as a form of collision warning, even if the Active Cruise Control is disabled. A first level warning alerts when a vehicle is detected ahead, signaling that rider intervention is required. A second level warning comes on when the system detects a more dangerous scenario, where the system expects it cannot maintain a safe distance and emergency braking is required. For safety reasons, Active Cruise Control cannot perform emergency braking by itself; riders still have to be ready for emergency measures.

BMW hasn’t outlined when we will see the Active Cruise Control on a production motorcycle, but we’re likely looking at the 2021 model year, coinciding with Ducati and KTM’s adoption of the technology. BMW’s sample images show the system equipped to a K1600GT but we expect it will be available on a wide range of models. There may be some regulatory hurdles to deal with, so it’s unclear if BMW will offer the technology in all markets.

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Dennis has been a part of the Motorcycle.com team since 2008, and through his tenure, has developed a firm grasp of industry trends, and a solid sense of what's to come. A bloodhound when it comes to tracking information on new motorcycles, if there's a new model on the horizon, you'll probably hear about it from him first.

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BMW Will Let You Activate More Functions To Your New Car After Purchase

Functions like active cruise control will become available for purchase on BMW's ConnectedDrive Store

 BMW Will Let You Activate More Functions To Your New Car After Purchase

by Michael Karkafiris

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Buyers of new BMW models will be able to add more functions to their vehicles post purchase via the company’s updated ConnectedDrive Store.

BMW owners will be able to activate functions such as the High-Beam Assistant, the Active Cruise Control (ACC) driver assistance system with Stop&Go, and the BMW Drive Recorder, with the German brand to add more functions over time.

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“We want to offer our customers different dimensions of sheer driving pleasure – including the latest digital services and the possibility of booking functions as needed,” said Peter Henrich, Senior VP, BMW Product Management. “ All new BMW vehicles are now technologically enabled for this and we will be systematically expanding this offering.”

Also Read: 2020 BMW X3 Goes Down The Plug-In Hybrid Route With New xDrive30e

This means that customers will be offered new digital options for features that may not have been available at the time of buying or leasing their vehicle. That includes new models fitted with BMW’s Remote Software Upgrade technology ( on the Operating System 7.0 ) that were first purchased in August 2019.

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This follows BMW’s announcement to charge an annual fee for having Apple CarPlay on its cars , which was met with criticism, but the German manufacturer appears confident that this is the way to go. “In the long run, we could also imagine digital services no longer being linked to the car, but to the customer who books them,” added Henrich. Other functions that might follow in the future include Remote Engine Start or Adaptive M Suspension.

Of course for that to happen, BMW will have to fit its models with all the necessary hardware from the get-go, a practice pioneered by Tesla ; both the High-Beam Assistant and the Active Cruise Control with Stop&Go are apparently available to every car but to activate the BMW Drive Recorder, your car will have to be fitted with the Parking Assistant Plus which has the necessary camera hardware.

“Our goal is to ensure the customer no longer has to adapt to the specifics of their vehicle, but for the vehicle to be geared instead towards their personal and individual requirements,” explains Jens Thiemer, Senior VP, Customer and Brand BMW.

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  1. How to set and adjust the adaptive cruise control on the 2019 Acura RDX. MS

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  2. Here's a quick lesson on how to use the BMW Active Cruise Control

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  3. What is active cruise control and how does it work?

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  4. What is Active/Adaptive Cruise Control?

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  5. A guide to adaptive cruise control

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  6. How To Use Adaptive Cruise Control In a Land Rover

    add on active cruise control

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  1. Adaptive Cruise Control: What Is It and How Does It Work?

    Simple to use, all you need to do is turn on the system in your vehicle, reach your desired cruising speed, and set it. The system then assumes control of the accelerator, maintaining the set...

  2. Aftermarket Cruise Control Kits at Summit Racing

    Add an aftermarket cruise control kit to your ride by choosing one of many universal cruise control kit options from Summit Racing! We carry a variety of cruise control kits, including ones from Rostra, Dakota Digital, ididit, Ron Francis, Flaming River, and more! Find your aftermarket cruise control kit today at Summit Racing! Individual Parts

  3. What Is Adaptive Cruise Control?

    Adaptive cruise control (ACC) is a system designed to help vehicles maintain a safe following distance and stay within the speed limit. This system adjusts a car's speed automatically so drivers...

  4. What Is Adaptive Cruise Control? Is It Worth Paying For?

    Jun 2, 2020 Today's coolest luxury car technologies often become features on mainstream cars tomorrow. Take cruise control as an example; today, nearly every new car has it except for...

  5. Guide to Adaptive Cruise Control

    Adaptive cruise control (ACC) is like traditional cruise control, but smarter. ACC systems allow you to set a desired speed until your vehicle encounters slower-moving traffic. Then it will brake ...

  6. Adding Aftermarket Cruise Control Is Easier Than You Think

    Set a constant speed, lift your foot, and let the car glide down the pike. But what if your vehicle didn't come with cruise control? No worries. There are plenty of aftermarket kits to add cruise control to your ride. If you have some basic skills, this DIY upgrade can happen in an hour or two. Shop now for cruise control kits

  7. Adaptive Cruise Control

    Available on select Ford vehicles is a series of Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) features employing advanced radar and camera technology. 10 ACC lets you set a cruising speed and distance from the vehicle ahead of you. When it slows down, you automatically do too; when traffic picks back up, you resume your preset speed and distance.

  8. Adaptive cruise control

    Adaptive cruise control ( ACC) is a type of advanced driver-assistance system for road vehicles that automatically adjusts the vehicle speed to maintain a safe distance from vehicles ahead. As of 2019, it is also called by 20 unique names that describe that basic functionality. This is also known as Dynamic cruise control. [1]

  9. Adaptive Cruise Control: What is ACC in ADAS?

    Adaptive cruise control or Active Cruise Control (ACC) is an advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) that automatically adjusts a vehicle's speed when there are slow-moving vehicles ahead, with the aim of maintaining a safe following distance. When the road ahead is clear, ACC automatically accelerates to your pre-set speed.

  10. What is adaptive cruise control, and how does it work?

    Adaptive cruise control (ACC) is an intelligent form of cruise control that slows down and speeds up automatically to keep pace with the car in front of you. The driver sets the maximum speed ...

  11. Cars with Adaptive Cruise Control: Everything You Need to Know

    What Does Adaptive Cruise Control Do? Adaptive cruise control uses advanced sensory technology to determine your car's speed in proximity to other vehicles or objects on or around the...

  12. Adaptive Cruise Control: What It Is & How It Works

    Adaptive cruise control is a form of intelligent cruise control, also known as active cruise control, autonomous cruise control, smart cruise control, and radar cruise control. A radar sensor is ...

  13. What is Intelligent Adaptive Cruise Control?

    Watch the video and follow the steps below to learn how to use Intelligent Adaptive Cruise Control, which combines Speed Sign Recognition with Adaptive Cruise Control , to adjust the cruise set speed to the speed limit detected by the speed sign recognition system.

  14. Adaptive Cruise Control

    Adaptive Cruise Control uses a forward-looking camera or a forward-looking camera and radar technology (depending on your vehicle) to monitor vehicles you're following. This feature helps you follow a vehicle ahead at the following gap you select (Far, Medium, or Near) while you steer.

  15. Motorcycles with Adaptive Cruise Control

    Adaptive cruise control, also (less often) known as active cruise control, has been coming for a while now to premium motorcycles, and it's beginning to trickle its way down to more and more affordable models.

  16. A guide to adaptive cruise control

    Adaptive cruise control (ACC) is an intelligent form of cruise control that allows vehicles to speed up and slow down automatically in order to keep pace with the traffic ahead. ACC is also known as autonomous cruise control, active cruise control, intelligent cruise control and radar cruise control. But regardless of what it's called, it's ...

  17. Adaptive Cruise Control

    Learn how to operate your 2020 Dodge Charger's intelligent cruise control system, also known as adaptive cruise control or ACC. This dynamic radar cruise con...

  18. Adaptive Cruise Control

    Learn how to operate your 2020 Ram 1500 DT's intelligent cruise control system, also known as adaptive cruise control or ACC. This dynamic radar cruise contr...

  19. Active Cruise Control explained

    The Active component of Active Cruise Control comes in the form of a RADAR or LIDAR sensor (depending on your manufacturer's choice of technology) in the front of the car. This sensor allows you to set the distance you want to follow the car in front, normally measured in time, typically 2, 3 or 4 seconds.

  20. Volkswagen Cars w/ Adaptive Cruise Control (All 11 Models)

    Adaptive cruise control (ACC) enhances the conventional cruise control system by adjusting the car's speed to match the vehicle ahead, slowing or accelerating to the set speed when appropriate. ... 2009 to 2021 had cruise control in the pricier variants, and all pre-2009 models only had the system as an optional add-on. Model Years: System ...

  21. How do I use Adaptive Cruise Control?

    Press ON on the cruise control switch on your steering wheel. Drive at your desired speed. Press and release the SET+ button. Take your foot off the accelerator. The speed control system indicator light will illuminate when you turn Adaptive Cruise Control on. The color of the indicator changes to indicate the system's status.

  22. BMW Releases Details on Active Cruise Control System

    BMW released details about its new Active Cruise Control system, its version of Bosch's Adaptive Cruise Control technology.Whatever the name, the system uses radar sensors to detect objects ahead of a motorcycle and adjusts the cruising speed to maintain a safe distance.Our own Ryan Adams got a first-hand look at Bosch's system in 2018, and both KTM and Ducati have announced plans to ...

  23. BMW Will Let You Activate More Functions To Your New Car ...

    BMW owners will be able to activate functions such as the High-Beam Assistant, the Active Cruise Control (ACC) driver assistance system with Stop&Go, and the BMW Drive Recorder, with the...

  24. Adaptive Cruise Control-How to use the smart cruise control on your

    Learn how to operate your 2019 Jeep Cherokee's intelligent cruise control system, also known as adaptive cruise control or ACC. This dynamic radar cruise con...

  25. Super Bowl Commercials 2024 List: Watch Them All

    See Super Bowl ads with Tom Brady, Jenna Ortega, Chris Pratt (as the Pringles guy), Addison Rae, Ben Affleck, Ice Spice, Lionel Messi and more.