Recruitment & Admissions

Mcgill - virtual campus tours.

From the comfort of your own home, come on a virtual tour of McGill’s downtown campus - with a LIVE student host! You can ask all the questions you have and interact with the host online. Nestled into the side of Mount Royal, in the heart of the city, McGill’s downtown campus offers an exceptional space for outdoor and city lovers alike. With its rich heritage, abundance of green spaces and lively urban vibe, it’s a campus you’ll want to discover! This virtual tour is designed for prospective students. The live student host will show you around the central part of campus, give you the inside scoop on student life, academics, life in Montreal, library resources, clubs on campus and much more. You can check out the athletics complex and residences as well. Please note that live virtual campus tours are currently on hold. They will resume soon.

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Campus tours

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Discover our downtown campus

McGill’s downtown campus is in the heart of vibrant Montreal, surrounded by cafés, museums and galleries. The campus green is a peaceful retreat from our bustling city – it’s the perfect place to hang out and study. 

Raymond Hall at Macdonald campus

Discover our Macdonald campus

Located on 1,600 acres of waterfront property, Macdonald Campus is a high-tech hub nestled deep in nature, with computerized greenhouses, culinary laboratories and its very own farm. Chat with our current undergrads to discover what they love about studying at Mac campus.

Live Virtual Tour

Virtual Tour with a LIVE host

Come on a virtual tour of McGill’s downtown campus - with a LIVE student host! Ask your questions and interact with the host online. 

Make the most of your time here

Student Ambassador

Talk with a McGill student

This one-on-one virtual meeting with one of our student ambassadors is your chance to ask all of your questions about student life, academics, life in Montreal and much more.

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Try food on campus

Grab a quick snack, locally roasted coffee, or even a homemade pizza.

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Visit the gym

Swimming, track, spin class or fitness centre? How will you keep active?

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Hit the library stacks

Get lost in books. Find the best research leads in our 13 libraries.

Roddick Gates (McGill University Downtown Campus)

Visit McGill from home

You can explore our world-class facilities and take in the beautiful scenery and architecture on campus – all from the comfort of your home. Tour our libraries, athletics facilities, residences-and your future faculty!

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Department and University Information

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Spend a day and find where you belong

Take a campus tour of IU Indianapolis. You’ll get to ask questions, hear from students, and learn why this is your perfect next step.

Looking for a graduate tour?

We offer monthly graduate tours. You’re always welcome on our daily tours, too!

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Sign up for a tour

There’s nothing like experiencing IU Indianapolis in person. Bring your family and friends to check out our dynamic campus and soak in all the energy downtown Indy has to offer.

Tours for prospective undergraduate students take place most weekdays at 9:30 am and 1:30 pm (Eastern time). They’re led by current students, so you’ll have the chance to ask questions about their experiences and get some advice.

The day starts with a 30-minute presentation in Room 240 of the Campus Center. A 60-minute tour follows. While you’re here, be sure to meet with a school representative so you can learn even more about our academic programs and how they align with your interests.

We promise—you’ll have a blast!

Considering IU Indianapolis for graduate studies? The Graduate School offers monthly tours with a short presentation by an Emissary for Graduate Student Diversity in Room 240 of the Campus Center. The tour takes about 90 minutes. Of course, you’re always welcome to join one of our daily campus tours!

Campus Center, Room 240

420 University Blvd, Indianapolis IN 46202

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Summer College Tours: Who to Meet and What to Do

Summer allows for longer college visits, but some parts of campus may be closed and some people unavailable.

Summer College Tours Checklist

A group of young people are walking up a set of stairs. They are carrying backpacks and handbags. Scene is casual and relaxed

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Whether students are set on a major or still exploring, one of the top priorities should be asking to visit a building where they might spend a lot of their time.

Key takeaways:

  • Summer visits allow you to spend more time on campus.
  • Professors and others may be unavailable and some buildings may be closed.
  • Plan visits when you can meet in person with someone.

While many students and families take college visits during the school year, the summer is still a busy time for college admissions offices to coordinate campus visits. With students not bound by a school schedule or single-day campus tours during the school year, the summer offers more flexibility for students and parents to spend a longer time or multiple days on campus.

“The summer really is an ideal time for that exploration," says Kent Barnds, vice president of admissions, financial aid, and communication and marketing at Augustana College in Illinois. "There’s a little greater flexibility on a college campus then to accommodate visits. Summer is sometimes an ideal time for a student and a family that is at the beginning of the college search and may be a little uncertain about what they want."

Summer visits often allow students and families to explore campus more freely and find parking more easily, says Kelly Nolin, director of undergraduate admissions at the University of Montana .

A less-crowded campus can also be good for students who may feel anxious about the college experience and can be a less-intimidating way for them to acclimate to a campus environment, she adds.

But it also means students won't get a sense of what the campus feels like when everyone is there, Nolin says. Families should also be aware that some professors may not be available and some offices or buildings may be closed or inaccessible during the summer.

But experts say that with some planning and coordination, families can still schedule effective campus visits. Here are some tips for planning summer college tours.

Be Intentional When Planning a Visit

While it's less frequent than during the academic year, some colleges hold formal visit days during the summer to ensure people from certain offices are present, such as financial aid, academic advising , counseling, residence life and career services. Augustana does this each summer, Barnds says, and he encourages families to plan their visits on those days if possible.

An alternative would be to coordinate with a person or office your student sees as a priority, such as a coach for a prospective athlete or a professor in their field of interest, and schedule an in-person meeting with them – then plan the rest of the visit around that. Families who show up unannounced hoping to see certain people or buildings may not have much luck, Barnds says.

“It never hurts to ask if that meeting might be available, but I do think that students and families have to temper their expectations about who may be available on any given day," he says. "That’s one of the reasons why one of the formal days might be better visit opportunities, because usually college campuses might be mobilizing more resources."

Employees on 12-month contracts, such as those in career services , financial aid and residence life , will likely be on campus, Barnds says, but Nolin says it's still best to plan a meeting ahead of time, preferably at least two weeks in advance. Admissions counselors can often help with this.

"Counselors are a great resource for not just the time on campus but for what families might want to do in the area," she says. "They can recommend other things to check out. They can also set realistic expectations for who is and who isn’t on campus."

Who to Meet and What to See on Campus Visits

A crucial part of an effective college visit is getting questions answered and having conversations about important parts of the college experience, such as available courses, extracurricular activities , residence life, joining a Greek organization and what's available through student support services.

Visiting certain buildings and offices and meeting with specific campus personnel can also help students make informed college decisions. Here's who and what should be on that list, experts say.

Speak With Tour Guides

Barnds, who is also Augustana's executive vice president for strategy and innovation, says the most important resource during summer visits is often the student tour guide.

"That experience of going on a campus tour with a current student, having the ability to ask that current student questions, that’s the most important part of that summer visit experience," he says.

If possible, students should elect to take a guided rather than self-guided tour so that someone is there to answer questions or provide access to buildings that might otherwise be closed, he says.

Visit Primary Study Buildings and Meet With Faculty

College tours sometimes take students through campus without entering buildings. Whether students are set on a major or still exploring, one of the top priorities should be asking to visit a building where they might spend a lot of their time, Barnds says.

For example, a prospective biology major should ask to see a lab, while a prospective journalism student should ask to see the journalism building or student publications office.

Nolin adds that students should also visit the campus library and university center, and meet with faculty or other academic representatives in their prospective major.

"This might not be a faculty member since many professors are not on campus during the summer," Nolin says. "However, they may be able to talk with a departmental adviser or recruiter."

Though some professors are off campus or out of town conducting research during the summer, some may still be local and available to meet in person either in their office or at an off-campus location such as a coffee shop. Others may be open to meeting virtually, Barnds says.

Eat at the Campus Dining Center

Some schools require residential students, especially first-year students , to purchase a meal plan , which can cost between $3,000 and $5,500, or much more in some cases. Because of that, and the number of meals students will likely eat on campus , experts say visiting students should eat at least one meal on campus. Some schools provide at least one complimentary meal as part of the visit.

"Summer is a good time to try out the dining center because it’s a lot less crowded, although choices may be limited," Nolin says. "It’s most important for students with allergies or food intolerances to try a meal while visiting so they can make sure their nutritional needs will be met."

If the dining center is closed, Barnds encourages students to ask current students or campus employees to recommend several local restaurants where students often enjoy eating. This allows prospective students to get a taste of what’s available in town and experience the atmosphere off campus.

Tour a Residence Hall

Some schools require first-year students to live on campus , but some students may choose to do so for convenience or other reasons even as upperclassmen. Experts say visiting students should ask to see a residence hall building and a dorm room while on their visit if it's not part of the tour.

These visits can typically be set up through the school's residence life office, and some schools have a model dorm room for students to tour while visiting.

Meet With Student Services and Other Support Personnel

Some students may need additional support while in college, whether for academic tutoring, mental health counseling, physical or learning disability accommodations or special health needs and accommodations. Others may want to meet with people in the diversity office, a campus religious ministry or the health center.

Scheduling those meetings over the summer may allow for more meetings and in-depth conversations with the appropriate people, experts say. Knowing where those offices are located, who to contact and what services are available is important to ask about on a summer campus tour, Barnds says.

"Those are sometimes the facilities people don’t see on their campus tours but are the most important facilities once they actually get to a campus," he says.

Searching for a college? Get our  complete rankings  of Best Colleges.

14 Tips for an Effective College Visit

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ASU symposium connects race, place and civic genealogies

Event marked launch of center for the study of race and democracy initiative.

Books on a table.

Attendees of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy's recent Race, Place and Civic Genealogies symposium in Washington, D.C., received gift bags from ASU, including the book "Sleeping with the Ancestors" by keynote speaker Joseph McGill Jr., founder of The Slave Dwelling Project. Photo courtesy of Hager Sharp

For Phoenix-based civil rights leader Carole Coles Henry, uncovering the lineage of her ancestors has been a goal more than 50 years in the making. Her research, made difficult by the lack of genealogy records of enslaved people, eventually led her to a database created by reporter Julie Zauzmer Weil.

The database listed more than 1,800 U.S. Congressmen who were slaveholders. Among them was Walter Coles, who served in both the Virginia house of delegates and the U.S. House of Representatives – and who was a direct ancestor of Henry’s.

Henry searched the database, finding her own family history, and wrote Weil a letter to see if she had any additional information on the Coles. From there, a friendship was formed, and Weil ended up writing an in-depth article for The Washington Post about Henry and her ancestral connections to enslavement and freedom in Virginia.

Two women speaking.

After years of communication, Henry and Weil met in person for the first time at Arizona State University’s inaugural Race, Place and Civic Genealogies symposium in Washington, D.C.

The symposium, hosted June 13 by ASU’s Center for the Study of Race and Democracy , brought together scholars, journalists, artists, legal professionals and civil rights advocates to explore the deep-rooted connections between history, race, democracy and justice.

“I keep telling her, we’re kindred spirits,” said Henry during a symposium panel with Weil and The Washington Post editor Lynda Robinson. “This is my first time seeing her in this project — it’s been an amazing journey.”

Henry, the center's advisory board chair, captivated the room as she detailed her experience seeing the more-than-200-year-old plantation where her ancestors were enslaved for the first time.

“There was a spiritual connection that I had at that home,” Henry said. “I felt my ancestors were here and now here I am, hundreds of years later.”

Center for the Study of Race and Democracy wins Tempe Chamber 2024 Diversity Impact Award

Tempe Chamber 2024 Diversity Impact Award.

This Diversity Impact Award celebrates leaders and organizations who have made significant contributions to the Tempe community.

The award represents a significant milestone for the center, reflecting its unwavering commitment to fostering inclusive and transformative dialogue about race and democracy. It acknowledges the center's efforts in supporting transformative scholarship, building robust partnerships and honoring ASU's dedication to academic excellence and accessibility.

Center Director Lois Brown thanked the Tempe Chamber of Commerce and its president Colin Diaz for the award and noted that the recognition fueled the center's commitment to keep doing its ambitious and well-received work. Brown encouraged all in attendance at the awards ceremony to have "the courage to keep doing what is necessary" and to "marshal the courage to keep learning more, to ask what else there is to know and to do what is necessary not just to be brave but to be present" when it comes to the vital topics of race and democracy.

Henry’s story is just one of many that were discussed at the symposium showing the complicated, often painful process of Black people learning about previously suppressed genealogies.

“This is a gathering that has been inspired by histories that have long been understudied,” said Lois Brown, director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy. “And today, we have an opportunity and also a responsibility to think deliberately about how race and place and genealogy will advance our collective understanding of democracy.”

The symposium’s keynote speaker, Joseph McGill, felt a calling similar to Henry’s. McGill is the founder and executive director of The Slave Dwelling Project , an organization working to enforce a more truthful recounting of America’s history by preserving Black slave dwellings across the country.

McGill travels to places where enslaved people lived and spends the night there, connecting historical sites with enslavement of Black people in order to shed light on how deeply slavery was entrenched in all parts of the country.

“Slavery, in my head in 1979, meant a slave cabin in a southern state,” McGill said. “I was missing a whole lot. … I was missing urban slavery. And I was also missing northern slavery, because in my mind, northern slavery didn't exist.”

According to McGill’s research, historical sites like Monticello include a more honest detailing of history in site tours than they did 10 to 20 years ago, but more still needs to happen.

“I do what I do because these enslaved ancestors were muzzled when they were here on this Earth, and we’re now their voices,” McGill said.

The daylong event featured remarks from Arizona Rep. Greg Stanton, as well as presentations, memoir readings and panel discussions.

“This is an important conversation, and this is the right place to have this conversation, here in the nation's capital,” Stanton said. “It's important that we take the time to reflect on how profoundly the horrors of slavery have shaped all aspects of our society to this day and led to injustices that continue to affect African American people throughout the United States.”

The symposium also addressed contemporary issues, such as reparative justice in the context of national and global racial violence.

“Reparative justice is more than compensation,” said Dreisen Heath, an advocate for racial justice who spoke at the symposium. “It’s a process of acknowledging historical wrongs, restoring relationships and reclaiming identities and heritage."

Tijuana Phelps Jackson, an Impact Arizona Fellow with the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy, called attention to the upcoming Juneteenth holiday, which acknowledges the two-year delay of emancipation for an estimated 250,000 enslaved children, women and men in Texas.

“Juneteenth is a powerful reminder of the resilience and perseverance of our ancestors,” Phelps Jackson said. “It is a day to celebrate freedom and renew our commitment to justice and equality. Attention to understudied and underestimated histories enables us to better honor the hundreds of thousands enslaved in America and for whom justice and equality was long denied.”

Henry echoed that sentiment: “There are aspects of this history that are not so positive, and I believe a lot of that needs to be recorded and shared, because this is American history,” she said. “This is not just the Black or African American experience. It belongs to all of us.”

Man speaking behind a lectern.

Joseph McGill Jr. is the founder and executive director of The Slave Dwelling Project, an organization working to enforce a more truthful recounting of America’s history by preserving Black slave dwellings across the country.

Photo courtesy of Hager Sharp

People seated for a panel discussion.

A panel delves into a discussion on "Righting History," moderated by Center for the Study of Race and Democracy Director Lois Brown (left), with The Washington Post writers Julie Zauzmer Weil (second from left) and Lynda Robinson (right) alongside center Advisory Board Chair Carole Coles Henry (second from right).

Two people stand next to a sign that reads

Center for the Study of Race and Democracy Director Lois Brown (left) and Congressman Greg Stanton at the Race, Place and Civic Genealogies symposium in Washington, D.C.

Courtesy photo

This story was written with contributions from Hager Sharp and Debbie Richmond .

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ILR Announces Six New Faculty

The ILR School will welcome six new faculty members who begin July 1.

“The new faculty will reinforce ILR’s research strength and enable the school to continue offering an outstanding curriculum, including expanding our course offerings into new topics in the world of work,” said Alexander Colvin, Ph.D. ’99, the Kenneth F. Kahn ’69 Dean and Martin F. Scheinman ’75, M.S. ’76, Professor of Conflict Resolution at the ILR School.

Following the recent retirement of labor economists Francine Blau, Gary Fields and Lawrence Kahn, the Department of Economics will welcome Elio Nimier-David and Jason Sockin.

Established a year ago, the school's Global Labor and Work Department welcomes Paul Ortiz, Emma Teitelman and Devin Wiggs, while Forrest Briscoe joins the Department of Organizational Behavior.

The new faculty and their departments are:

Forrest Briscoe Organizational Behavior • Ph.D., Management (MIT Sloan) • A.B., Environmental Science & Public Policy (Harvard)

Briscoe comes to ILR after 21 years at Penn State University, where he spent 17 years at the Smeal College of Business after a four-year stint in the Department of Labor & Employment Relations. He was promoted to the rank of full professor in 2017 and also held appointments in the Department of Sociology and at the Center for Health Policy Research.

His research focuses on how organizations decide to adopt new practices and strategies, and how such changes spread across industries and fields of organizations. Briscoe is especially interested in how organizational decision-makers act when there is controversy surrounding the changes they are considering and when stakeholders are advocating for and against those changes.

A second research stream focuses on the effects that new and changing organizational practices have on employees. In this work, Briscoe focuses on how changes are affecting professional employees whose traditional ways of working are being challenged and disrupted.

Elio Nimier-David Economics • Ph.D., Economics (Ecole Polytechnique – ENSAE Paris) • Eng., Economics and Statistics (ENSAE) • M.S., Economics (Paris Saclay University) • M.S., Social Sciences (Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS) Paris Saclay)

Nimier-David recently concluded a postdoctoral research scholar position at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

His research lies at the intersection of labor economics, firm dynamics and spatial economics, with a strong interest in the factors that promote firm creation, firm growth and local economic activity. His work combines quasi-experimental designs with large-scale administrative data to identify the effects of major education and labor market policies on firms, individuals and cities.

Nimier-David, who was selected for the 2023 EALE Tour, is also a member of the Global Repository of Income Dynamics project, working on earnings inequality, mobility and income risk. Paul Ortiz Global Labor and Work • Ph.D., History (Duke University) • B.A., History, Political Economy, and the Sociology of Science (The Evergreen State College)

Ortiz will join the ILR faculty after 15 years in the history department at the University of Florida, where he held affiliate faculty memberships in African American Studies , Latin American Studies, the Center for Gender, Sexualities and Women’s Studies , Art & Art History and the Bob Graham Center for Public Service.

At Florida, Ortiz serves as the director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program , which offers digital humanities production and experiential learning classroom and fieldwork opportunities year-round.

A third-generation U.S. military veteran, Ortiz has written several books, including An African American and Latinx History of the United States , which received the 2018 PEN Oakland-Josephine Miles Award for Literary Excellence.

Before his time at Florida, Ortiz taught in the Department of Community Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, between 2001-2008. He was also a visiting assistant professor in history and documentary studies at Duke University between 2000-2001.

Jason Sockin Economics • Ph.D., Economics (University of Pennsylvania) • B.A., Economics and Mathematics (Stony Brook University)

Sockin is a labor economist at the U.S. Treasury who is interested in better understanding how the internet and technology have fundamentally altered how workers and firms interact in today's labor market.

He has worked as a researcher at Penn Wharton Budget Model, Glassdoor, the Congressional Budget Office, the Council of Economic Advisers during the Obama Administration and the Federal Reserve System Board of Governors.

Emma Teitelman Global Labor and Work • Ph.D., History (University of Pennsylvania) • B.A., History (Wesleyan University)

Teitelman comes to ILR following a stint as an Assistant Professor at McGill University. A historian with a particular interestin the history of labor, inequality and state formation, especially during Reconstruction and the late-nineteenth century.

Her first book, Lumber and Lodes: The Social Reconstruction of the South and the West After the U.S. Civil War (forthcoming with Harvard University Press), is a history of capitalist power and worker politics in the wake of emancipation.

Teitelman also spent two years at Penn State, where she was an assistant research professor and the associate director of the Richards Civil War Era Center. That came after a three-year appointment as the Mellon Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in American History at the University of Cambridge.

Devin Wiggs Global Labor and Work • Ph.D., Sociology (Northwestern University) • M.A., Sociology (Northwestern University) • B.A., Sociology (Augsburg University)

Wiggs earned his Ph.D. from Northwestern University this spring. His thesis, “Labor’s Assets: Unions, Pensions, and Capital Strategies in the American Labor Movement,” examines unions as investors and as activists of “labor’s capital” – workers’ retirement savings – in both public and private equity markets.

Overall, Wiggs’ research moves along two fronts – investigating the activism and structures of labor movements, especially American labor unions, and examining the origins and consequences of financialization.

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mcgill university tours

Graham Sommer Trio Premiere in Pollack Hall, May 2021

The Graham Sommer Competition for Young Composers will invite audience members into the world of composition with the premiere of new works for piano trio (violin, cello, and piano). The winners of all prizes, including the audience prize, will be announced following the performance and jury deliberations.

In the spirit of Graham Sommer’s love for sharing music, the competition will take place during Quebec’s 25th edition of the Journées de la Culture  in September 2021; this annual event promotes greater access to arts and culture for everyone, giving participants a peek into the creative process with free activities all over the province.

In Conversation with the Finalists (September 25, 2021)

Chris Paul Harman, Canadian composer and Composition Area Coordinator in the School's Department of Music Research, will moderate a discussion with the five competition finalists prior to the concert and prize gala on September 26. The discussion will focus on what it means to be an emerging composer and to write for piano trio.

This free event will take place at 2:00 p.m. in Tanna Schulich Hall in the Elizabeth Wirth Music Building (527 Sherbrooke Street W.). Please register in advance.

Concert and Prize Gala (September 26, 2021)

The Concert and Prize Gala will take place at 3:30 p.m. on September 26, 2021 in Pollack Hall at the Schulich School of Music of McGill University. If you can't attend, you'll be able to watch the webcast on the School's YouTube page .

Graham Sommer Trio Amy Hillis, violin Chloé Dominguez, cello Meagan Milatz, piano

Alec Hall | The National Anthem Laurence Jobidon | Hublots Michael Kim-Sheng | Burning in Clarity Jared Miller | Absolute Matthew Ricketts | Still There

Download the complete programme  or see it on your mobile devices

Vote for your favourite work following the performances! www.mcgill.ca/gsc/vote

Tickets are available online , at the Schulich School of Music Box Office by phone (514-398-4547) or in person: Monday to Friday 14:00 to 18:00 (555 Sherbrooke Street West).

Help keep our community safe

The safety of our community and our students’ education remain a top priority.

As of September 1, 2021, spectators aged 13 or over will need a vaccine passport to attend concerts at the Schulich School of Music. The vaccine passport, along with a photo ID (photo optional for people aged 13 to 15, and 75 or over), must be shown upon entering the venue.

If you do not have a vaccination passport, you will be denied access to the hall.

The following passport formats are accepted with photo ID:

  • Paper format
  • PDF format on your mobile device
  • From the VaxiCode application

To download your vaccine passport, please visit the following page .

Attending events at Schulich

  • Please arrive at least 20 minutes before the start of the event and have your vaccination passport and photo ID ready BEFORE you arrive at the door to the hall to help our staff facilitate your entry. Your patience and understanding is most appreciated.
  • Procedural masks must be worn by everyone while circulating in Schulich buildings and concert halls. Masks will be available upon entrance to the Elizabeth Wirth and Strathcona Music Buildings.
  • Our concert halls are also classrooms which are in use throughout the day. Patrons are permitted to remove their masks only once they are seated, but are encouraged to keep them on throughout the performance.
  • Please respect posted social distancing guidelines, including seat availability.
  • Hand sanitizing stations are available throughout the McGill campus.
  • The Schulich School of Music is following all Government of Quebec and McGill University guidelines and directives closely. Visit the events calendar regularly as access to our halls is subject to change.

We thank you for your continued support.

Keep informed on how COVID-19 affects the Schulich School of Music via our FAQ.

Graham Sommer Trio

Graham Sommer Trio

Amy Hillis, violin

mcgill university tours

Amy Hillis challenges artistic norms in order to build and cultivate community relationships inside and outside the concert hall. As a soloist, she has commissioned and premiered new Canadian works by Jocelyn Morlock, Nicole Lizée, Carmen Braden, Randolph Peters and Jordan Pal. Amy has "a rich, warm sound and has mastered the violin with such ease, that it is impossible to ignore her passion in performance" ( Ludwig Van Montréal) . She is winner of the Eckhardt-Gramatté National Music Competition , an artistic residency at La Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris , the McGill Concerto Competition, and the Sylva Gelber Foundation Music Award.

As part of the meagan&amy duo, Amy was selected as winner of the inaugural "Pan-Canadian Recital Tour" to perform 50 recitals across all thirteen Canadian provinces and territories. Her duo’s debut album titled Roots demonstrates the connections between select Canadian compositions and works from the traditional canon of classical repertoire. Amy is also a founding member and manager of the prairie-based Horizon String Quartet . During seven different tours, the HSQ has performed over 200 interactive concerts for more than 10,000 young people in 100 different Canadian cities.

Amy is currently Assistant Professor and the Helen Carswell Chair in Community-Engaged Research in the Arts at York University. She holds a Doctor of Music in Violin Performance from McGill University, completed under the guidance of Axel Strauss and with the support of the Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). She completed her Master of Music at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music with Ian Swensen and her Bachelor of Music at McGill University with Denise Lupien. While growing up in Regina, Amy studied with the concertmaster of the Regina Symphony Orchestra, Eduard Minevich.

Amy performs on the 1902 Enrico Rocca violin, on loan from the Canada Council for the Arts Musical Instrument Bank .

amyhillis.com

Chloé Dominguez, cello

Chloe-Dominguez

Chloé Dominguez is known for her versatility and rich tone. Her reputation as an avid chamber musician has led her to perform in Canada, the United States, and many international festivals. She recorded under the labels ATMA, Oxingale Records and Espace 21.

She holds the solo cello position at the Orchestre classique de Montréal as well as the Ensemble Contemporain de Montréal +. As a fervent advocate of today’s music, she has premiered many works as a soloist.

Chloé Dominguez has received numerous prizes and awards. In 2009, she was a winner of the Canada Council’s Musical Instrument Bank Competition and was awarded McGill’s Schulich School of Music’s Golden Violin award.

She completed her doctorate degree in performance at McGill University. She curently teaches at the McGill University, the Domaine Forget’s music academy and the Université du Québec à Montréal.

Chloé plays on a 1745 Lorenzo Carcassi cello.

Meagan Milatz, piano

Meagan Milatz

Meagan Milatz , pianist, has appeared as soloist with orchestras across Canada including the Regina Symphony Orchestra, the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, l’Orchestre symphonique de Sherbrooke, and the McGill Symphony Orchestra. Meagan is one of CBC’s “30 hot Canadian classical musicians under 30”, 2019 edition. Meagan embarked on a 50-concert, Canada-wide tour for the 2019/20 concert season alongside violinist Amy Hillis as the duo "meagan&amy", as winners of the first-ever Pan-Canadian Partnership Recital Tour offered by Jeunesses Musicales Canada, Debut Atlantic and Prairie Debut.

Meagan performs regularly as collaborative pianist for top international musicians, including Andrew Wan, concertmaster of l’Orchestre symphonique de Montréal; Stefan Dohr, Principal Horn of the Berlin Philharmonic; cellist Matt Haimovitz; and clarinetist Todd Cope, among many others. Meagan was top prize winner in the Shean Piano Competition, CFMTA National Piano Competition, McGill Classical Concerto Competition and Canadian Music Competition.

Meagan began her studies in Saskatchewan with Cherith Alexander and holds a McGill master’s degree studying piano with Ilya Poletaev and fortepiano with Tom Beghin. Meagan has also studied collaborative repertoire under the tutelage of Philip Chiu and was the recipient of a Sylva Gelber Music Foundation Award.

Department and University Information

Graham sommer competition for young composers.

The Graham Sommer Competition for Young Composers

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  1. Campus tours

    Explore McGill's downtown and Macdonald campuses with live or virtual guides. Book a session with a student ambassador, chat with a cégep student, or try food and facilities on campus.

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