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Last chance to say goodbye to the Queen: The coffin's route to Windsor confirmed

19 September 2022, 13:49 | Updated: 19 September 2022, 13:57

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By Emma Soteriou

The route of the Queen’s final journey from London to Windsor has been revealed as mourners get one last chance to pay their respects to the late monarch.

The Queen's coffin will embark on a 25-mile journey to Windsor Castle following the procession of her state funeral at Westminster Abbey in the morning.

The route will begin in London , making its way along quieter A-roads instead of motorways, in a move that has been "planned with the public in mind", according to Buckingham Palace.

Her coffin, covered in a flag and crown jewels , will be transported to St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle, arriving at about 3pm.

Read more: A son grieves for his mother: King Charles sheds a tear as world mourns the Queen

Read more: Queen’s final journey: Royals march by her side as coffin makes its way from Westminster Abbey to Windsor Castle

The hearse will pass through Hammersmith and Chiswick along the north bank of the River Thames as it continues through the capital.

It will make its way along the A4, A30 and then onto the A308, with well-wishers expected to line the roads to say their goodbyes.

What is the route of the Queen's coffin from London to Windsor?

  • South Carriage Drive
  • Queens Gate
  • Cromwell Road
  • Talgarth Road
  • Great West Road (A4)
  • Great South West Road (A30)
  • London Road (A30)
  • Staines Road (A30)
  • Windsor Road (A308)
  • Albert Road (A308)

The coffin will leave Westminster Abbey at 12.15pm for the procession to Wellington Arch in Hyde Park.

It will be taken from a Gun Carriage and placed into the hearse at 1pm.

Once at Windsor, the hearse will drive along The Long Walk, leading up to Windsor Castle.

Members of the Royal Family will accompany the coffin through the gates.

Road closures

Ahead of the event, the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead Council announced 21 roads would be fully closed all day on Monday as well as between midnight and 7am on Saturday.

The council added: "Residents living in these roads won't be able to leave or enter the area when the restrictions are in place."

It has also announced 29 further partial road and junction closures for the day.

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Queen Elizabeth II 1926–2022

queen's journey from westminster to windsor

The final journey London to Windsor, follow the route to the Queen's resting place

By Ivana Kottasová, Lauren Said-Moorhouse and the Visuals Team, CNN

The Queen will be laid to rest at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor. Dominic Lipinski - WPA Pool/Getty Images

A kingdom united in grief will mourn the loss of their revered Queen on Monday. Pomp and pageantry will be on display as tens of thousands line the streets of the British capital and hundreds of millions tune in for the state funeral of Elizabeth II.

Monday’s ceremonial events are the culmination of nearly two weeks of public arrangements, codenamed “Operation London Bridge,” honoring Elizabeth’s remarkable life -- from a young princess who was not born to be Queen, to a sovereign who redefined the role and won almost universal admiration.

Following the Queen’s death at Balmoral on September 8, her coffin was flown back from Scotland and moved to London’s Westminster Hall in a somber procession. She will lie in state there until the morning of her funeral.

Crowds of mourners will flood the capital in the hopes of witnessing the coffin -- draped in the Royal Standard and carrying the Instruments of State -- one last time before the Queen makes the journey to her final resting place within St. George’s Chapel in Windsor. Here’s everything you need to know about Britain’s farewell to one its greatest ever monarchs.

Monday, September 19 The day of the funeral and the final journey to Windsor

Westminster Hall At around 10:35 a.m. (5:35 a.m. ET), the coffin will be lifted from the catafalque. A bearer party founded by the Queen's Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards will carry it from Westminster Hall to the State Gun Carriage of the Royal Navy. The gun carriage will set off at 10:44 a.m. (5:44 a.m. ET) on the short journey from New Palace Yard to Westminster Abbey, where the funeral service will take place. The route will be lined by the Royal Navy and Royal Marines. King Charles III and members of the royal family will walk behind the coffin.

Westminster Abbey The service will be conducted by the Dean of Westminster, starting at 11 a.m. (6 a.m. ET). The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, will deliver a sermon. Towards the end of the service, at around 11:55 a.m., the Last Post will sound before a two-minute silence is observed. World leaders, politicians, public figures and European royals, as well as more than 500 dignitaries from around the world, will be at the service, which will be attended by up to 2,000 people.

Click below for a 360 view inside Westminster Abbey

Procession through London Following the roughly one-hour service, the coffin will be conveyed from Westminster Abbey to Wellington Arch -- again with the King leading some of the family on foot, while Camilla, the Queen Consort and others follow by car.

Whitehall The route -- lined by the Armed Forces -- will pass Parliament Square and go onto Whitehall, the street that cuts through London’s government district. It will pass the Cenotaph, the site of the annual National Service of Remembrance, which the Queen personally attended most years, and Downing Street.

Click below for a 360 view of Whitehall by Downing Street

Horse Guards Parade The procession moves through Horse Guards Parade, the setting for the annual Trooping the Colour ceremony held to mark the monarch’s official birthday. Here, the King’s Life Guard will turn out and give a royal salute as the coffin passes.

The Mall On The Mall, the royal procession will pass by royal residences Clarence House and St James's Palace.

Click below for a 360 view of The Mall

Buckingham Palace As the coffin moves past Queen Victoria Memorial for the last time, the King’s Guard will turn out in the forecourt and give a royal salute.

Click below for a 360 view of The State Rooms in Buckingham Palace

Wellington Arch The procession is expected at Wellington Arch around 1 p.m. (8 a.m. ET), where the bearer party will transfer it from the State Gun Carriage to the state hearse for the journey to Windsor.

Windsor The Queen’s coffin will be driven to Windsor, around 25 miles (40 kilometers) west of the capital. Windsor Castle is where the Queen lived for the last two years of her life.

The Long Walk Once in Windsor, the state hearse will be driven just after 3 p.m. (10 a.m. ET) along The Long Walk, a picturesque avenue leading to the castle where thousands will be waiting to bid the Queen farewell as she passes.

Windsor Castle The King and other royals will join the procession on foot as it passes through the castle’s quadrangle at around 3:40 p.m. (10:40 a.m. ET). Minute guns will be fired by the King’s Troop, Royal Horse Artillery from the East Lawn throughout the royal cortege.

Click below for a 360 view inside the grounds of Windsor Castle

St George’s Chapel The Queen’s coffin will be greeted by an honor guard founded by the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards mounted in Horseshoe Cloister at the foot of the West Steps of St. George’s Chapel. Soldiers from the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment will line the steps as the bearer party carries the coffin inside for the committal service.

A more intimate committal service will take place at St. George’s Chapel at about 4 p.m. (11 a.m. ET), conducted by the Dean of Windsor. The royal family will gather there along with a congregation made up of members of the Royal Household, past and present, as well as personal staff who have worked on the private estates.

St. George’s should be a familiar location to many as it is where Prince Philip's funeral service was held last April, as well as more jubilant occasions like the nuptials of the Queen's grandchildren.

At the service's conclusion, the Queen's coffin will be lowered into the Royal Vault, set below the chapel, where many royal family members have been laid to rest.

The service concludes the public arrangements for the late monarch, however, a private burial service will be held for the family later Monday evening. The Queen is to be buried with her late husband of 73 years, Prince Philip, in the King George VI Memorial Chapel, located elsewhere within St. George's.

The memorial chapel is where the Queen's father and mother were interred. A casket containing the ashes of the Queen's sister, Princess Margaret, is also there.

The Earl Marshal, the Duke of Norfolk, said last week that orchestrating the event was "both humbling and daunting.” He added that Monday’s event aimed to "unite people across the globe" and "pay a fitting tribute to an extraordinary reign.”

Queen buried beside her beloved Prince Philip as she completes her final journey

  • Windsor Castle
  • Royal family
  • Monday 19 September 2022 at 11:07pm

queen's journey from westminster to windsor

The UK said goodbye to its longest reigning monarch on Monday - Romilly Weeks reports

The Queen has been buried alongside her beloved late husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, at the King George VI Memorial Chapel at Windsor Castle.

It followed a poignant service led by the Royal Family, who sang hymns as they paid their final public respects to the Queen after a day of ceremonies in both London and Windsor.

The lowering into the Royal Vault of St George's Chapel during a committal service this afternoon was the last time the Queen's coffin was seen by the public.

Thousands lined the streets in London and Windsor to pay their finals tribute to Her Majesty as she was taken on her final journey.

Later in the evening, at around 7.30pm, members of the Royal Family attended a small and private burial service at the memorial chapel - An annexe of St George's Chapel.

It was at the Windsor chapel that Elizabeth II was interred with her husband of nearly 74 years, away from the public view.

The remarkable life of the Queen remembered in our latest episode of What You Need To Know

When the Duke died 17 months ago, his coffin was placed in the Royal Vault of St George’s – ready to be moved to the memorial chapel when the Queen died.

The Queen’s coffin was interred with the Grenadier Guards’ Queen’s Company Camp Colour – a smaller version of the Royal Standard of the Regiment – which the King placed on her coffin at the end of the committal service.

Britain's longest reigning monarch has also been buried next to her father, King George VI, and the Queen Mother, along with he ashes of her sister, Princess Margaret.

St George's Chapel held a special place in the Queen's heart, as it was where she marked many a Christmas and Easter, and where she celebrated the weddings of three of her grandchildren.

Prince Harry married Meghan Markle there in 2018, as did Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank. Peter Philips, the queen’s oldest grandchild, married Autumn Kelly there in 2008.

The queen spent most of her weekends in Windsor, a quiet and more private retreat away from the bustle of central London.

Windsor Castle — believed to be the largest occupied castle in the world — was also where young Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret were sent to live during World War II while their parents were busy with the war effort.

In recent years the Queen made Windsor her main residence, having moved there in early 2020 at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic.

During the first service at St George's, the Imperial State Crown, orb and sceptre were removed from the Queen's coffin by the Dean of Windsor.

The final hymn was sung as the King prepared to drape the Queen’s Company Camp Colour of the Grenadier Guards on the coffin.

Once in place, the colour was then accompanied by the Lord Chamberlain’s Wand of Office, which he symbolically broke.

The purpose of breaking the wand is to create a symmetry with the three Instruments of State that had been removed from the coffin - all of which symbolise the end of the Queen's reign.

The simple service was led by David Conner, Dean of Windsor, who recited Psalm 103 as the coffin was lowered, which includes the traditional line: “Go forth upon thy journey from this world, O Christian soul”.

The service ended with the Sovereign Piper playing the lament A Salute to the Royal Fendersmith from the doorway between the chapel and the dean’s cloister, with the music gradually fading away as he walked towards the deanery.

The Archbishop of Canterbury then concluded the service with a blessing before the congregation sang the national anthem.

The King appeared emotional as those in attendance at St George’s Chapel sang the national anthem.

King Charles sat in the same seat the Queen had sat in for the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral during the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Royal Hearse escorted by Grenadier Guards as it neared Windsor

The service at St George's Chapel came after a long procession from London following the State Funeral of the Queen.

The State Hearse carrying the casket was escorted to the castle by dozens of Grenadier Guards, in close protection around their company commander.

Behind them were members of the Household Cavalry and members of the royal family.

Many flowers, thrown by well-wishers along the route, remained on the bonnet and roof of the hearse.

The Royal Hearse travelling up the Long Walk

Around 100,000 people were thought to have turned up at Windsor to pay their respects to the Queen and catch a final glimpse of her casket being driven past.

The Long Walk to the castle was lined with members of the armed forces on either side, stood in front of the thousands upon thousands of members of the public.

Silence fell among crowds of mourners as the hearse turned into the Long Walk in the final stretch of her journey.

The Queen's two corgis, Muick and Sandy, were waiting to greet their monarch in the castle quadrangle. The dogs will be going to live with the Duke of York.

The Queen's corgis waiting in the quadrangle waiting for the procession

Carltonlima Emma, the horse the Queen so loved to ride around the castle grounds, was also waiting at the side of the procession as the hearse passed.

Terry Pendry, who went riding often with the Queen, stood on Cambridge Drive holding the horse and bowed his head.

Earlier, hundreds of thousands of well-wishers lined the route of the funeral procession through the capital and beyond to say their last goodbyes, while millions around the globe watched the state funeral proceedings on TV.

The Queen’s coffin was placed gently into the state hearse before a sea of colourful military personnel, bands, and some cavalry gathered around Wellington Arch.

The Queen's favourite horse being passed by the procession

The transfer from the gun carriage to the vehicle took place in a still silence as the King, the Queen Consort and other senior members of the Royal Family stood to its side just metres away.

The King and the Queen Consort could be seen leaning their heads together to exchange a few words at one point.

Princess Charlotte, stood between her parents the Prince and Princess of Wales, clasped her mother’s hand.

The King and military personnel all saluted as the state hearse pulled away and the national anthem was played.

As the cortege made its way through the streets, roses and other flowers were thrown towards the hearse. Cheers and applause rang out among the packed crowds.

The King and his siblings walked behind the coffin as it left Westminster Abbey following the state funeral, while other royals travelled by car.

Noreen Roberts, who watched the procession in London after losing her friend on the same day the Queen died, said she had imagined them in heaven together after the coffin was borne along The Mall.

Ms Roberts, 63, from Hitchin, Hertfordshire, said she had felt the late monarch’s presence as the cortege passed.

“I definitely felt her presence today. It was nice to feel close to her one last time,” she said.

“For such a little person she had this huge presence. I lost my friend on the same day she died and I can imagine the two of them up there at the pearly gates.”

People across the UK poured to London and Windsor to mark the Queen's funeral - Geraint Vincent reports

ITV News' Correspondent Emily Morgan, who was on the A4 as the hearse went by, said: "As  it rounded the corner onto the A4 a hush descended.

"As it came past me there was a spontaneous eruption of clapping, people cheering. I don’t think anyone expected that to happen, it was a real outpouring of love and grief.

"There are still people standing here now. I think they're finding it difficult to walk away, to accept that this moment, for them at least, is over."

The Royal Hearse departing London

The procession arriving at Wellington Arch

During the service, the King was visibly moved and looked close to tears as the national anthem was sung in the Abbey.

Prince George was also comforted by his mother, the Princess of Wales, during the service.

In a personal touch, the wreath adorning the Queen’s coffin had a handwritten note, which was penned by the King.

The message said: “In loving and devoted memory.”

Around 2,000 people attended the Queen’s funeral at Westminster Abbey, including members of royal families from across Europe, politicians from all sides of the political spectrum and world leaders, including US President Joe Biden and French President Emmanuel Macron.

King Charles and the Queen Consort walked immediately behind the coffin as it entered the Gothic church for the service, followed by the Princess Royal and Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence, then the Duke of York, followed by the Earl and Countess of Wessex.

Prince George and Princess Charlotte walked with their parents and were followed by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex and other members of the royal family.

The aerial view of the Royal Hearse on its journey towards Windsor

During his sermon, the Archbishop of Canterbury told the congregation the outpouring of emotion for the Queen “arises from her abundant life and loving service, now gone from us”.

Justin Welby described the Queen as having touched “a multitude of lives” and being a “joyful” figure for many.

He told mourners: “People of loving service are rare in any walk of life. Leaders of loving service are still rarer.

“But in all cases those who serve will be loved and remembered when those who cling to power and privileges are forgotten.

“The grief of this day – felt not only by the late Queen’s family but all round the nation, Commonwealth and world – arises from her abundant life and loving service, now gone from us.

“She was joyful, present to so many, touching a multitude of lives.”

The staff of Buckingham Palace salute the Queen

Mr Welby, standing in the church where kings and queens have been crowned since 1066, also said that the Queen had declared on her 21st birthday “that her whole life would be dedicated to serving the nation and Commonwealth”.

He added: “Rarely has such a promise been so well kept. Few leaders receive the outpouring of love we have seen.”

Among the hymns sung at the service, The Lord’s My Shepherd, I’ll Not Want, was also sung at the Queen’s wedding to the Duke of Edinburgh in the abbey in 1947.

The other hymns were The Day Thou Gavest, Lord, Is Ended; and Love Divine, All Loves Excelling.

As the abbey fell silent, the Queen’s Piper, Warrant Officer Class 1 (Pipe Major) Paul Burns, played the traditional lament Sleep, Dearie, Sleep. Also played were The Last Post, Reveille and the national anthem.

The Archbishop of Canterbury making a reading at the Queen's funeral

The Queen’s coffin was draped in the Royal Standard, with the wreath of flowers requested by the King.

Cut from the gardens of Buckingham Palace, Clarence House and Highgrove House, the flowers and foliage have been chosen for their symbolism.

They include rosemary, for remembrance, and myrtle cut from a plant which was grown from a sprig of myrtle in the Queen’s wedding bouquet. Myrtle is an ancient symbol of a happy marriage.

The funeral was broadcast live at around 125 cinemas and several cathedrals in the UK, and on a big screen in Holyrood Park in front of the Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh.

Several big screens were also set up in Hyde Park, while London’s City Hall said all public viewing areas for the Queen’s funeral procession were full.

Monday marks the climax of what is being regarded as the biggest security operation the UK has ever seen, surpassing the operation for the Platinum Jubilee weekend and the London 2012 Olympics, which saw up to 10,000 police officers on duty per day.

It was also the largest global protection operation dealt with by the force, with world leaders, dignitaries and other VIPs attending the state funeral.

Former counter-terrorism police chief Nick Aldworth said it was “probably the biggest operation that we’re likely to mount in the UK”.

It comes at a time when the country’s terrorism threat level stands at “substantial”, meaning an attack is “likely”.

Police and security services were alert to the prospect of knife attacks, bombs being detonated, and all other possible terror threats or incidents. So-called lone actor terrorism, in particular knife attacks, are now considered the main threat.

But police guarding the King and senior members of the royal family also have to consider the risks posed by people who are fixated with those in the public eye.

Members of the public were urged to report any suspicious behaviour, with security experts describing potential terrorists among the crowds as people who would seem “blatantly out of place” and uninterested in ceremonial events.

The risk of a threat is “fairly high” particularly when Charles comes into contact with crowds, according to a royal security expert.

Richard Aitch, director of operations for firm Mobius International, said it becomes “very difficult” for personal protection officers when the monarch is so close to a “group of unknowns” like crowds and they would be carrying out a split second process of “personal vetting” to root out suspicious activity.

As of 5pm on Monday, 67 arrests had been made as part of the operation for a range of offences, the Met said.

More than 3,000 officers from almost every force in the country were helping police in London.

Met Commissioner Sir Mark Rowley, who only took over the role a week ago, likened the possible total number being deployed to the size of West Midlands or Greater Manchester police.

Armed police, motorbike escort riders, officers carrying out patrols on horseback, dog teams and the marine unit were among the specialist teams involved.

Rooftop snipers were in place while the cortege was moving, accompanied by a helicopter escort anywhere outside of the capital, Mr Aldworth said.

There were more than 22 miles of barriers in central London alone to control crowds and keep key areas secure.

About 2,300 police officers were in place to oversee the Queen’s final journey from Westminster Abbey to Windsor Castle.

"It was a last hurrah for Her Majesty", ITV News' Geraint Vincent speaks to mourners who came to see the Queen's very last journey.

About a thousand lined the route, alongside military personnel, from the Abbey to Wellington Arch while the Queen’s coffin was carried from the service by gun carriage.

There was also a considerable police presence in Windsor ahead of the Queen’s committal later in the day.

Thames Valley Police said around 2,000 of its officers were deployed in the force’s “largest and most significant” operation, and were joined by colleagues from 28 other forces.

In the Berkshire town, drones were used to monitor crowds, vehicle barriers were in place and there were “airport-style” security checks like screening arches and bag searches.

What time does the Queen arrive in Windsor? Route map from Westminster and when committal service starts

A committal service will take place at st george's chapel at 4pm, before the queen's burial at the king george vi memorial chapel.

The coffin of Britain's Queen Elizabeth II is carried out of the Westminster Abbey in London on September 19, 2022, during the State Funeral Service. (Photo by HANNAH MCKAY / POOL / AFP) (Photo by HANNAH MCKAY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

The Queen’s coffin has been transferred to the State Hearse for its journey to Windsor following her state funeral at Westminster Abbey .

Elizabeth II was carried to the service on a gun carriage pulled by sailors from the Royal Navy , after her lying-in-state at Westminster Hall concluded on Monday morning.

She is making her way to St George’s Chapel for a committal service , followed by her burial – here’s how the rest of the day will unfold .

The funeral of Queen Elizabeth II Final farewell as her coffin is returned home to her beloved Windsor for committal service Crowds lining London streets say Queen’s funeral was more moving than they could have imagined At 6.32am, Black Rod closed the doors on the Queen’s Lying in State. Then overwhelming silence Liz Truss makes first appearance as Prime Minister on global stage with reading at the Queen’s funeral

What time does the Queen arrive in Windsor?

The Queen’s coffin was transferred from the gun carriage to the hearse at Wellington Arch at Hyde Park Corner , and it set off after a brief ceremony.

It is heading west out of London along the A4 before passing Heathrow Airport on the Great South West Road (A30).

The funeral cortege is scheduled to arrive at Shaw Farm Gate on Albert Road, Windsor, at 3.06pm .

There, it will join a procession, which will already have been formed at the gate, and make the solemn journey up Long Walk to the George IV gate at St George’s Chapel.

A committal service will then start at the chapel at 4pm, conducted by David Conner, the Dean of Windsor, and attended by a congregation of 800 guests.

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These will include the King, the Royal Family, realm prime ministers, governors-general and mourners from the Queen’s household past and present, including personal staff from across her private estates.

The majority of those attending will not have been present at Westminster Abbey.

The location is a poignant reminder of the  Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral last year , which was  attended by just 30 people , due to  the Covid restrictions of the time , Elizabeth II sitting alone as  she bade farewell to her husband .

While the committal will  be televised live , the Queen’s burial service taking place later in the day will be a “deeply personal” ceremony away from the public’s gaze.

What is the Queen’s route from Westminster to Windsor today?

The full route from Hyde Park Corner in central London to Long Walk Windsor is as below:

  • South Carriage Drive
  • Queens Gate
  • Cromwell Road
  • Talgarth Road (via Hammersmith Flyover)
  • Great West Road (A4)
  • Great South West Road (A30)
  • London Road (A30) (via under Chiswick Flyover)
  • Staines Road (A30)
  • Windsor Road (A308)
  • Albert Road (A308) to Shaw Farm Gate

The route of the Queen's coffin from Wellington Arch to Windsor Castle for her state funeral (Photo: PA)

The final part of the procession’s route from Shaw Farm Gate is expected to be done on foot, up Windsor Castle’s famous three-mile Long Walk.

The state hearse will join the procession, which will have been formed up and in position, at Shaw Farm Gate before travelling to St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle.

Map shows the route of Queen Elizabeth II's funeral procession to Windsor Castle (Photo: PA)

Just before 4pm, the procession will halt at the bottom of the West Steps of St George’s Chapel in Horseshoe Cloister, where the bearer party will carry the coffin in procession up the steps into the chapel.

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Queen Elizabeth's Final Journey Through The Streets Of London - Route

Over 2,000 people, including royals from across the world and the heads of states, will attend queen elizabeth's funeral in london today..

Queen Elizabeth's Final Journey Through The Streets Of London - Route

Queen Elizabeth's coffin will be carried through the streets of London to Windsor.

Queen Elizabeth's funeral is set to be held today with her lying-in-state ceremony formally ending at 11 am (IST). The government has meticulously drawn up a plan for the funeral service and her burial with a timetable and roadmap in place for her procession through the streets of London.

Over 2,000 people, including royals from across the world and the heads of states, will attend the funeral in London. Viewing areas have also been set up for the public.

The coffin of the longest-serving British monarch, who died on September 8, will be carried on a state gun carriage at 3:14 pm for a short procession from Westminster Hall to Westminster Abbey, where the state funeral will begin. The funeral service will be conducted by the Dean of Westminster David Hoyle with the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby giving the sermon.

The funeral service will close at 4:30 pm with the national anthem "God Save The King" being played along with a Lament, a musical expression for grief. The coffin will then be drawn on the gun carried towards the Wellington Arch at Hyde Park near the Buckingham Palace. King Charles, other royals, and detachments from the armed forces of other Commonwealth nations. The coffin will arrive at the Wellington Arch at 5:30 pm and will be moved to the royal hearse for its onward journey towards Windsor Castle.

The royal hearse will arrive in Windsor at around 8:10 pm and make its way towards the castle with the king and senior royals joining the procession on foot. The queen will be laid to rest alongside the remains of her father, King George VI, her mother, also called Queen Elizabeth, and the ashes of her young sister, Princess Margaret, at a private burial service at the King George VI Memorial Chapel around midnight. Her late husband Prince Philip's coffin will also be interred there at the same time.

The procession of the queen's coffin will travel along Broad Sanctuary, Parliament Square, Whitehall, Horse Guards Parade, Horse Guards Road, The Mall, and Constitution Hill on its way from Westminster Abbey to the Wellington Arch.

The coffin, transferred to a state hearse, will then travel along South Carriage Drive to the Albert Memorial, where it will depart for Windsor. The hearse will travel in procession along Albert Road and the Long Walk to St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle. A committal service will be held at 8:40 pm at St George's chapel.

Click here for the UK government's guide to the ceremonial events for the queen's funeral. Here's a route map of the procession.

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How to watch?

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Those in London can watch the procession at the viewing areas along the route of the procession in London. In total, there are eight viewing areas along the route. All events will be screened at London's Hyde Park too.

Those not in London can follow the radio and TV broadcast on the funeral.

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queen's journey from westminster to windsor

London to Windsor route revealed where thousands can see Queen's coffin on day of funeral

Thousands of people are expected to turn out along the route to say goodbye to the Queen.

queen's journey from westminster to windsor

Foreign news reporter @MikeRDrummond

Sunday 18 September 2022 18:44, UK

The Queen's cortege will travel from Westminster to Windsor

The route the Queen's coffin will take from Wellington Arch to Windsor Castle for the committal service on Monday afternoon has been revealed - with thousands of people expected to turn out.

Here we look at the timings for the Westminster Abbey service and the route of the Queen's final journey afterwards.

6.30 : The Queen's lying in state ends.

8.00: Doors to Westminster Abbey open to allow general congregation to take their seats.

9.30: World leaders and dignitaries begin to arrive.

10.35: Coffin lifted and carried in procession to the state gun carriage of the Royal Navy positioned outside the north door of Westminster Abbey.

10.44: Gun carriage will set off, pulled by 98 Royal Navy sailors using ropes in a tradition that dates back to the funeral of Queen Victoria. Following the Queen's coffin will be the King, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward. Behind them will be the Queen's grandsons Peter Phillips, the Duke of Sussex and the Prince of Wales.

10.52: The procession will arrive and the coffin will be carried into Westminster Abbey for the service.

11.00: Funeral service begins.

11.55: Last Post will sound followed by a two minute's silence to be observed in the Abbey, and throughout the United Kingdom.

12pm: The national anthem will bring the state funeral service to a close.

1pm: Queen's coffin arrives at Wellington Arch after being returned to the state gun carriage for the procession. The King and members of the Royal Family will again follow the Queen's coffin. Minute guns will be fired in Hyde Park and Big Ben will toll throughout.

The coffin will then be transferred from the gun carriage to the hearse which will leave London for Berkshire.

Public viewing areas along the route from Westminster Abby to Wellington Arch

It will travel west along the south edge of Hyde Park before passing through Queens Gate and heading along Cromwell Road.

More than 24-hour wait to see Queen lying in state - royal news latest updates

Watch live stream of Queen lying in state

Public viewing areas along the route through Kensington

Continuing through the capital, it will pass Hammersmith and Chiswick along the north bank of the River Thames.

The route the hearse will take through west London

Taking the Great South West Road it will pass south of Heathrow Airport - under silent skies after a slew of flight cancellations - as it leaves London and goes past Staines.

The route the hearse will take from west London to Windsor Castle

The Queen's coffin will enter the grounds of Windsor Castle through Shaw Farm Gate and head north before finally arriving at St George's Chapel for the service which begins at 4pm.

The route the procession will take into Windsor Castle

Interest in saying goodbye to the Queen has been huge, with tens of thousands queuing to see the monarch lying in state at Westminster Hall.

It has been 70 years since the death of the previous monarch, Queen Elizabeth II's father George VI, so the vast majority of people in the UK are unaccustomed to the traditions and pageantry that have been on display over the last few days.

Tens of millions of people around the world are expected to watch as the Queen's funeral takes place.

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Procession at Windsor

As the coffin arrives in Windsor there will be a procession as it makes its way towards the chapel.

Walking behind the gun carriage will be King Charles, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and the Earl of Wessex.

Behind them will walk royal brothers Prince William and Prince Harry, as well as Peter Phillips.

Further back, a royal car will carry the Queen Consort and the Princess of Wales, and a second will carry the Duchess of Sussex and the Countess of Wessex.

Timings for Windsor ceremonies:

3.06pm: The state hearse will approach Shaw Farm Gate on Albert Road, Windsor, and join the procession.

3.10pm: Procession will depart going up the Long Walk towards Windsor Castle

3.20pm: Governors general and realm prime ministers will begin to arrive at the West Door of St George's Chapel for the committal service

3.25pm: Members of the Royal Family not involved in procession will arrive

3.40pm: The King and members of the Royal Family who are walking in the procession will join it at the quadrangle on the north side as it passes into Engine Court

3.53pm: The procession will halt at the bottom of the west steps of St George's Chapel in Horseshoe Cloister. The bearer party will lift the coffin from the state hearse, from where it will be carried in procession up the west steps.

4pm: Committal service begins

4.30pm: Service ends. King Charles departs.

Among the congregation at the service will be past and present members of the Queen's household, including from the private estates.

A private burial will take place in the King George VI memorial chapel later that evening, conducted by the Dean of Windsor.

The Queen is to be buried with the Duke of Edinburgh.

Read more: Everything you need to know about the Queen's funeral - from how to watch to historic royal traditions

Watch and follow the Queen's funeral on TV, web and apps on Monday from 9am

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Mourners and onlookers gathered in Hyde Park to watch the Queen’s funeral.

‘Now we have her no longer’: the crowds on the Queen’s final journey

As the coffin made the short trip to Westminster Abbey before heading on to the palace then Windsor, many were determined to pay their respects

  • Funeral of Queen Elizabeth II - live updates

A s the Queen’s coffin emerged from Westminster Hall just before eleven o’clock for the short, slow journey to her funeral service at Westminster Abbey, the thousands who had gathered at Parliament Square, on Whitehall, and along the Mall, gradually fell into silence. The companionable chatter stilled, some climbed to their feet from folded chairs. Some bowed their heads.

Many, even among those who had been there all night, were dressed in black, others wore a chestful of medals or a union jack waistcoat, or wrapped themselves in a flag. There were woolly beanies and black fascinators, selfie sticks and a few stepladders.

Each had come for his or her own reason: to express personal sadness at the Queen’s death, to represent absent family members who would have wanted to be there – or just to be part of a big day. Janine Cleere from Wiltshire had camped out all night on the Mall, sharing a single sleeping bag with two friends against the September chill in order to be “part of history”.

People waiting on the streets near Whitehall

“She’s all we have ever known and now we have her no longer,” she said. “It’s very sad.”

For Christina Burrows, who had bagged a spot next to a bollard on Whitehall, it was important to come. “I’ve always seen her as a beacon. During lockdown, when she said ‘We’ll meet again’, that was wonderful. It gave me a lot of hope. I wanted to be here for her like she was for us.”

As she spoke, she sighed and clapped her hands to her face. “Oh God, I can’t believe it. There will never be another day like this in our lives.”

For some, the early start and long, long wait had taken its toll. Having left home in Northampton at 4am, passing some of the hours by counting the windows in Buckingham Palace, seven-year-old Esther Young dropped off on the lap of a family friend just as the long-awaited service began.

Esther Young dropping off in a friends lap

A million people had been expected to come to central London on Monday. Many tens of thousands had done so already in the strange days since she died, queueing for hours along the Southbank in a display of self-consciously British resilience of which the late monarch herself would surely have been proud.

Late on Sunday the queue was closed, and at 6.30am Chrissy Heerey, a serving member of the RAF from Melton Mowbray, became the very last member of the public to pass by the coffin in Westminster Hall. It was, she said, “one of the highlights of my life … I feel very privileged to be here”.

Cara Jennings, 52, from Minster in Kent camped for five nights to get a good view on the Mall. She’s jealously guarding her spot at the front of the railings.

Outside, some were going to work or coming home from a bank holiday night out; others were preparing for a big day ahead. Outside Buckingham Palace those who had camped out for days were desperately trying to hold on to their spots in the front row. Cara Jennings, 52, from Minster in Kent was wrapped in a blanket after her fifth night camping by Green Park.

With her mobility scooter parked beside her pop up blue tent, she tried to guard her position at the front row of the railing on the Mall. “I just wanted to get a perfect spot to pay my respects to a lovely woman,” she said. Jennings said her grandmother and great-grandmother had worked for the queen as cleaners and that her five children thought it was “brilliant” that she’d made the pilgrimage.

Not everyone who arrived here before dawn is an ardent fan. Antonis Manvelides, 24, and Jess Nash, 24, have come to the Mall on their fourth date.

Not everyone was there as an ardent royalist. Antonis Manvelides, 24, and Jess Nash, 24, had come to the Mall on their fourth date, walking from Nash’s flat in Pimlico at 4am to be there. “I forced him to come,” Nash, who works for a tech startup, said. “We just wanted to see and be with the UK and be part of the atmosphere.”

But there was no doubting that for many others it was a moment of genuine and deep emotion. The mood was quiet, broken by the occasional cheer as the police officers on the Mall, trying to entertain the crowds, rode their horses up to the barriers.

Amrit Nagy and her mother, Meena, had woken at 5.30am to travel to London from East Ham, the younger woman clutching a candle which she had designed and which she hoped to leave near Buckingham Palace.

They had also attended the funeral of the Queen Mother and the now Prince and Princess of Wales’s royal wedding. Compared with that event, said Amrit, “It’s not as loud, and everyone is more respectful. She appreciated the Queen as “the grandmother of the nation”, she said.

Sarah Merrick with her children, and best friend

Sarah Merrick had left home in Hampshire early in the morning to secure a spot for her best friend, their children, and their camping chairs. A veteran of the big occasions, Merrick also camped out for the Princess Royal’s wedding in 1972, the Jubilee in 1977, and again for Charles and Diana’s wedding in 1981.

She would have slept overnight again for the funeral, but was unable to because of her foster carer responsibilities – she’s planning to make up for it at the King’s coronation, when she will sleep out for two nights, she insisted.

The royals, she said, “offer a lot to this country. I have so much respect. The Queen has been there all my life – it’s weird referring to the King now.” As for the crowd, “People are mostly kind, but there’s a bit of pushing and shoving.”

On Whitehall, too, there was a little anxiety about securing a good viewpoint. “The difficulty is you always think there might be a better view 100 metres away,” said Robert Madeley, who along with his friend Christopher Clowes had come from Leicestershire in full morning dress – “it’s what she would have wanted” – with a box of flapjacks in hand.

Entertaining the children with a game of cards

Parents lifted their children above the throng of crowds to catch a glimpse, while others sought to keep their tired offspring entertained with iPads and games of Top Trumps. One youngster in need of the toilet asked anxiously: “We’re not going to lose our place, are we Daddy?”

The funeral demanded the largest security operation ever seen in London, and careful marshalling of the crowds. With so many world leaders attending, police had over the weekend gradually extended a secure cordon around Westminster Abbey, meaning the nearest members of the public were several hundred metres away. It meant that the delicate choreography of the arrival of the Queen’s coffin and its slow passage into the abbey was watched only by the cameras, and a handful of media on a temporary wooden stand.

While the service was broadcast on speakers along the route, moving some to tears, others resumed chatting among each other during the service. As the congregation at its close sang the national anthem, the crowds on the Mall joined in – many, notably, singing God Save the Queen, doubtless for the last time.

Marion King, who had camped out with her sister since Saturday

Marion King had been in high spirits in the morning, celebrating her 59th birthday by camping out with her sister since Saturday. During the service, however, she “cried buckets”. “We were emotional when the children went past in the cars on the way to Westminster and when we listened to the service over the speakers.

“There was not a sound in the two minutes’ silence, you could hear a pin drop over here.”

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As the service ended, the crowd outside Buckingham Palace stayed almost silent, waiting for the procession to arrive and speaking only in hushed whispers, while gulls could be heard overhead.

For some of the youngest members of the crowd, however, it had been a very long wait. Several families used the children perched on their shoulders as look-outs for the anticipated moment when the coffin would pass and exchanging tips on how best to spot it. Others with strong enough internet signal followed the TV coverage on their smartphones.

As the gun carriage finally passed, with the King and other family members behind, there was a crush to the barriers, as people stood on chairs and held cameraphones high to capture the moment.

Others were overcome by the emotion of the day. “I can’t speak without crying,” said Paul Denham from Westbury in Wiltshire, who had watched the procession with his wife, Diana. “I am 62 and she’s been there for my whole life, and now she isn’t.”

Diana had struggled to get through “God Save the King,” she said. “My mum died 18 months ago and the Queen reminded me of my mum. They had what we thought were similar smiles.”

An emotional moment on the Mall

After a final, brief ceremony away from the public gaze at Wellington arch, the coffin was lifted from the gun carriage and placed in the state hearse for its final journey to Windsor.

Long after it had departed and the world’s leaders had been transported away in coaches in the manner of a very high-end school trip, 91-year-old Anne van Drimmelen was sitting contentedly in a chair by the front of the Parliament Square barriers, waiting for the crowds to clear.

Having attended the Queen’s coronation and the funeral of her father, George VI, van Drimmelen decided several days ago to travel from her village of Flore in Northamptonshire. “It was something I just wanted to see.”

She had been guarded during her two-day stay by a neighbour from home, Sharon Mayne (“We heard she was going and thought, she can’t go alone”) along with others she met in the queue, while police officers brought the elderly woman cups of tea.

Was the long wait worth it?

“When the gun carriage came out from parliament everyone suddenly went silent,” said Mayne. “You could hear a pin drop. It was a magical experience.”

In Windsor, meanwhile, dense crowds had gathered in the Great Park to witness what the BBC commentator Huw Edwards had referred to several times as the Queen’s journey “home”, to Windsor Castle.

It had been a long wait for many, but as the hearse, led by the Household Cavalry and escorted by members of the Grenadier Guards, turned into the historic, long parade that leads up to the castle, the crowd fell silent. Some applauded, while a great many others filmed the procession, the crowd so dense that many at the back could glimpse the procession only by lifting their phones high on selfie sticks. On its bonnet and roof were flowers that had been thrown by members of the public as it passed.

Jay Gallagher, 47, had travelled from Kettering, Northamptonshire, with his partner and son. Having served for six years as an infanteer in the Royal Anglians 2nd regiment, he referred to the Queen as his “boss”. “She was someone who I have always looked up to,” he said. “I served for her.”

Tep Crowder, 57, from the nearby village of Holyport, said he came to Windsor to see the Queen “for the last time”.

“The values she held make us who we are, she made us Britain,” he said. “She gave us a special place in the world. She showed us how to behave.” Without the Queen, Crowder said, there was a “sense of instability”, adding King Charles had “big shoes to fill”.

For Kirsty Jones, seeing the last part of the public journey had “really felt final”.

Clad with union flags and a toy Paddington bear, she had stayed overnight in a nearby hotel with her husband and their children, Amelia, 11, Hadley, nine, and Hattie, seven, after paying their respects in their home town of Sandringham, Norfolk.

“You do see more when you watch it on the television from home, but I wanted the children to actually be part of it and feel the sadness and the grief that everyone is feeling,” she said.

Her husband added: “It’s about making memories – somebody said on the television this morning that it marks the end of the postwar era – and it does feel like the end of an era.”

As the coffin passed beyond the crowds for the final time and into the grounds of the castle for her private committal service, it was greeted by the Queen’s favourite horse, Emma, while two of her corgis, Sandy and Muick, awaited her arrival at the chapel steps. First, though, it passed through a carpet of flowers, some of the many thousands of bunches that had been left by her subjects as a final mark of affection and respect from them to a cherished and remarkable Queen.

Reporting by: Esther Addley, Aubrey Allegretti, Archie Bland, Emily Dugan, Jamie Grierson, Rachel Hall, Ben Quinn, Emine Sinmaz, Peter Walker

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queen's journey from westminster to windsor

Queen Elizabeth II's final journey: From the Westminister Hall in London to Windsor Castle

The funeral of Queen Elizabeth is set to take place on Monday, alongside processions in London and Windsor, with public viewing areas and big screens in both locations.

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Britain's Prince Harry (C), Duke of Sussex, stands next to Britain's King Charles III (2nd R), Britain's Princess Anne, Princess Royal, and Britain's Prince William (L), Prince of Wales, as they salute in London on September 19, 2022, for the State Funeral Service for Britain's Queen Elizabeth II. - Leaders from around the world will attend the state funeral of Queen Elizabeth II. The country's longest-serving monarch, who died aged 96 after 70 years on the throne, will be honoured with a state funeral on Monday morning at Westminster Abbey. (Photo by HANNAH MCKAY / POOL / AFP) (Photo by HANNAH MCKAY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

The Queen’s coffin is now making its final journey to Windsor Castle .

Hundreds of thousands of well-wishers lined the route through the capital to say their last goodbyes, while millions around the globe watched proceedings on TV.

There was a hush from the crowd in Whitehall, as the funeral procession moved past the Cabinet War Rooms and Downing Street.

Some emerged from balconies and windows, clad in black, while those on the street craned their necks and clutched cameras as they awaited the chance to say goodbye to the monarch.

As the procession moved past the Cenotaph, the King, the Prince of Wales, the Princess Royal and the Earl of Wessex saluted the memorial to Britain and the Commonwealth soldiers killed in the First and Second World Wars.

Sorry, this video isn't available any more.

LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 19: A general view of Mounties of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police along The Mall on September 19, 2022 in London, England. Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor was born in Bruton Street, Mayfair, London on 21 April 1926. She married Prince Philip in 1947 and ascended the throne of the United Kingdom and Commonwealth on 6 February 1952 after the death of her Father, King George VI. Queen Elizabeth II died at Balmoral Castle in Scotland on September 8, 2022, and is succeeded by her eldest son, King Charles III. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The crowd along the Mall broke into applause and cheers after the Queen’s coffin passed them and circled round the Queen Victoria Memorial outside Buckingham Palace.

Members of the royal family, including the King, remained expressionless as they marched behind, while other members of the royal family, including the Princess of Wales, looked on at the crowds as they passed them in vehicles.

The procession passed Buckingham Palace for the final time, as Her Majesty’s coffin travelled towards Wellington Arch.

Preceded by members of the armed forces, it was taken clockwise around the Victoria Memorial on a gun carriage drawn by naval ratings.

Staff members from the Palace said their final goodbyes as the late monarch moved by, standing with their hands clasped and heads bowed.

Crowds on The Mall stand for a two minutes silence during the state funeral and burial of Britain???s Queen Elizabeth in London, Britain September 19, 2022. REUTERS/Kevin Coombs

Mourners lining the barriers on Constitution Hill waved red and white roses as the Queen’s coffin passed them.

The King, the Princess Royal, the Duke of York, the Prince of Wales and the Duke of Sussex appeared solemn as they walked behind.

Princess Charlotte looked out at the crowds of people lining the street as she rode past in a car with the Queen Consort, the Princess of Wales and her brother Prince George.

The Duchess of Sussex and the Countess of Wessex both appeared sombre in a vehicle directly behind.

Following them, Princess Eugenie and and Princess Beatrice waved and smiled at mourners from a third car.

LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 19: The Royal Hearse carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II at Wellington Arch on September 19, 2022 in London, England. Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor was born in Bruton Street, Mayfair, London on 21 April 1926. She married Prince Philip in 1947 and ascended the throne of the United Kingdom and Commonwealth on 6 February 1952 after the death of her Father, King George VI. Queen Elizabeth II died at Balmoral Castle in Scotland on September 8, 2022, and is succeeded by her eldest son, King Charles III. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)

The Queen’s coffin was transferred to the State Hearse at Wellington Arch ahead of beginning its journey to Windsor for a committal ceremony later this afternoon.

Members of the royal family watched on as the bearer party lifted the coffin from the State Gun Carriage and loaded it into the back of the vehicle.

Much of the procession party lined up in formation on the green next to the monument and stood in silence during the moving of the coffin.

The King and military personnel all saluted as the state hearse pulled away and the national anthem was played.

As the Queen continued on her final journey out of London cheers could be heard from the distant park crowds.

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Guy Bell/Shutterstock (13402358f) The gun carriage pulled by Royal Navy ratings, carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II arrives at Hyde Park Corner on its way to Windsor Castle. The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II makes its final journey after the funeral service at Westminster Abbey., Constitution Hill, London, UK - 19 Sep 2022

Louis Bollard came dressed in a union flag to watch the funeral on the big screens in Hyde Park and see her coffin go past on its final journey to Windsor.

Mr Bollard, 29, said: ‘The funeral was very powerful. Seeing it was quite enchanting and mesmerising to see. It was a really, really nice, fitting tribute.

‘I just wanted to see her and say my last goodbye, more to pay my respects more than anything.

‘When you see it on TV it’s one thing, but when you see the coffin yourself, it’s completely different.

‘I also helped out in the queue last night, giving out refreshments for people, but I didn’t get to see her myself, which is why I wanted to come here and do it now.’

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2,300 police to oversee Queen’s journey to Windsor Castle

queen's journey from westminster to windsor

Around 2,300 police officers will oversee the Queen’s final journey from Westminster Abbey to Windsor Castle .

One thousand officers, alongside military personnel, will line the route from Westminster Abbey to Wellington Arch, as the Queen’s coffin is transported from the funeral service by gun carriage.

More than 3,000 officers from forces outside London will form part of the 10,000-strong team policing the funeral on Monday, which Metropolitan Police Deputy Assistant Commissioner Stuart Cundy described as the “final and most complex phase” of the operation after the death of the monarch.

Speaking to the PA news agency in the specialist operations room of the capital’s police force on Sunday, Mr Cundy said: “This is a policing operation the Met has been planning for a considerable amount of time but on Monday we will enter our final and most complex phase of our policing operation.

“First and foremost, our priority is to ensure a safe and a secure state funeral and processional route, but also safe and secure for everyone who’s attending.

“As part of the route from Westminster Abbey to Wellington Arch, we will have 1,000 police officers alongside military personnel lining the route.

“Those officers will be engaging with the huge crowds that we’re expecting in London and I’d ask anybody, if you are coming to London, to pay your respects and to see Her Majesty the Queen: if you see anything out of the ordinary, if you hear anything suspicious, please speak to one of the thousands of police officers who will be on duty.”

Speaking about the final leg of the procession, he added: “As Her Majesty the Queen takes her final journey across London and then to Windsor, we will have another 1,300 officers as part of that route.

“We have a well-developed and a well-rehearsed plan with Thames Valley Police and the Surrey Police as Her Majesty the Queen makes her final journey.”

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The Metropolitan Police said the 1,300 officers on the route between London and Windsor would be working in “a mobile capacity”.

Asked how officers would respond to any potential demonstrations, Mr Cundy said officers had been briefed and the force would “always take a balanced and proportionate response to whatever issues that we find”.

“Over the last week we have had so many people coming here to London to pay their respects to Her Majesty the Queen.

“All of our officers who will be on duty for the state funeral and for the route and across London have been briefed, they understand what their role is, and they all feel immensely privileged to be part of this overall police response.

“We will always take a balanced and proportionate response to whatever issues that we find. And we will only take action that is absolutely necessary.”

Speaking about concerns for the safety of officers after the stabbing of two members of the Met on duty in Westminster on Friday morning, Mr Cundy said: “The terrible, serious stabbing of two of our colleagues will always send a shockwave across all of us within the Met Police.

“I’m pleased to say that one of those officers has been released from hospital.

“We are professional in what we do, we have an absolute focus on what our responsibilities are, and on Monday for the state funeral, first and foremost our role is to ensure a safe and secure state funeral route and for all those who are coming to London.”

The specialist operations room in Lambeth is the largest of its kind in UK policing, and has played a central role in managing the capital’s largest events, including the 2012 Olympics and Trooping the Colour ceremonies.

On Saturday, King Charles III met new Metropolitan Police Commissioner Mark Rowley and officers involved in the security operation.

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queen's journey from westminster to windsor

Inside the Queen’s final journey – from London to Windsor Castle where thousands will line roads to say their goodbye

  • Scarlet Howes
  • Mike Sullivan
  • Published : 22:06, 16 Sep 2022
  • Updated : 6:43, 17 Sep 2022
  • Published : Invalid Date,

HUNDREDS of thousands of the Queen’s loyal subjects are expected to line the roads as she makes her last journey from London to Windsor Castle on Monday.

The final details of the route were revealed yesterday — chosen to maximise the chance for well-wishers to bid Her Majesty farewell .

After the state funeral the Queen’s coffin will be drawn by Navy sailors on a gun carriage

Almost 15,000 cops will be taking part in the funeral — in what has been called Britain’s biggest ever security operation.

After the state funeral, the Queen’s coffin will be drawn by Navy sailors on a gun carriage from Westminster Abbey to Wellington Arch, on Hyde Park Corner.

There, it will be lifted into the royal hearse to journey to Windsor Castle .

A Buckingham Palace source yesterday told The Sun: “The route was planned with the public in mind.”

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Andrew appears in military uniform as he stands vigil beside Queen’s coffin

Instead of taking the M4, which would have been the speediest route, the coffin will travel at 12mph along A-roads west from London to Berkshire.

Teams of cleaners have worked through the night and over the past 36 hours to prepare the route by litter picking, cutting verges and jet washing the roads.

The hearse will first travel through Knightsbridge on the Cromwell Road — past Harrods, the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Natural History Museum.

It will then continue on the A4 past Earl’s Court and the Famous Three Kings pub before making its way to the Chiswick roundabout beside the landmark Fuller’s Brewery.

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Ireland to be hit with heavy rain & mild temps - but 'uncertainty' on the charts

Ireland to be hit with heavy rain & mild temps - but 'uncertainty' on the charts

Met Office warns of snow to fall in just hours as temperatures plunge to 0C

Met Office warns of snow to fall in just hours as temperatures plunge to 0C

Continuing on the Great West Road, it will then turn onto the A30 at Hounslow to leave central London towards Heathrow Airport.

It will then travel along the A30 towards Staines, Surrey, where it will join the A308 towards Old Windsor.

The hearse will then pass the site where the Magna Carta was signed by King John in 1215.

The famous Runnymede field is a perfect spot for mourners, and many thousands are expected to be there.

While at Runnymede, Her Majesty will pass the JFK memorial and the Air Force Memorial which honours World War Two airmen.

The hearse will then travel though the village of Old Windsor, passing the Bells of Ouzeley Harvester pub and the Toby Carvery before reaching Albert Road, which leads to Windsor and flanks the Royal Estate.

At Shaw Farm Gate, on Albert Road, the hearse will pause to be joined by King Charles III and other royals before making the journey to The Long Walk, where tens of thousands of mourners will watch it enter Windsor Castle .

Prince Andrew and his ex-wife Sarah Ferguson were seen there yesterday, looking at floral tributes.

queen's journey from westminster to windsor

It comes as...

  • Kate and Wills reveal  how kids George, Charlotte and Louis are coping  after their great-grandmother's tragic death
  • Sophie Wessex shares an  emotional hug with a well-wisher  at a memorial for Her Majesty
  • Mourning Brits queue for hours  to visit the late monarch's coffin lying in state at Westminster Hall
  • Prince  Harry faces a lonely 38th birthday  without children Archie and Lilibet
  • Details of the  Queen's state funeral  are revealed - from  where William and Harry will stand  to  how Meghan will travel

The Duke of York, 62, looked deep in thought as he walked through the grounds to view the sea of flowers.

And in her first appearance since the Queen’s death , Sarah, 62, could be seen bending down to read the messages left by well-wishers.

It is thought the Duchess of York will attend the Queen’s funeral on Monday with her daughters Princesses Beatrice, 34, and Eugenie, 32 .

Around 10,500 Met Police officers will be on duty in London, supported by 2,000 colleagues from almost every other force.

More than 2,000 Thames Valley cops will also be present at Windsor.

Details about the huge scale of the operation emerged yesterday as police geared up to the task of protecting world leaders, hundreds of VIPs and millions of mourners.

Met Deputy Assistant Commissioner Stuart Cundy said: “As a single event, this is larger than the 2012 Olympics, it is larger than the Platinum Jubilee.

"The range of officers, police staff and all those supporting the operation is truly immense.”

Mr Cundy said the funeral would be the Met’s biggest ever global security operation — with US President Joe Biden among world leaders visiting.

Mr Biden is expected to fly into the UK today.

Tomorrow, he will meet Liz Truss for their first face-to-face chat since she became PM.

The Met has drawn up contingency plans to deal with threats including terror attacks, crowd crushing and criminals looking to exploit mourners.

It comes after two women were allegedly sexually assaulted in the queue to attend the Queen’s lying in state .

A man was remanded in custody.

A total of 34 people have been arrested in London in incidents connected with the period of mourning, several of them for protesting.

Police said that number was low.

  • Additional reporting: Natasha Clark and Julia Atherley

Bishops: Help all to grieve together

THE Archbishops of Canterbury and York have written an open letter urging people up and down the country to ensure no one is left to grieve alone during the Queen’s funeral.

Campaign group the Together Coalition, backed by community organisations and charities, is urging groups and individuals to reach out to those who might be alone.

The Queen with Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury

Writing in The Sun, Justin Welby , the Archbishop of Canterbury, urges Britons to come together on Monday.

THE funeral of Her Majesty The Queen on Monday will be an enormous moment for this country.

It will be a great privilege to be involved but this event is not just for the people who will be in Westminster Abbey — it’s for us all.

This is a time for the nation to come together, to remember and give thanks for the life of Her Majesty .

Grief is a normal response to loss and the funeral will be an opportunity for us to face it together.

It will be a Christian service but I believe there will be something in it — perhaps a song, a prayer, or a line from the Bible — that people of any faith or no faith might find comforting.

The important thing is that we come together, because in each other we find support, comfort and care.

Jesus asks us to love our neighbour.

On Monday, that means looking out for each other, especially those who might find the day particularly hard because they are alone, or remembering loved ones they have lost.

If each of us commit to calling someone who might appreciate it, or inviting someone to watch the funeral with us, or meeting friends or family, we can make sure no one feels alone and isolated on Monday.

I believe God is close to those who suffer.

But He also reminds us to show that same love to other people and be part of a community that cares for each other.

Read more on the Irish Sun

queen's journey from westminster to windsor

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That was what Her Majesty taught us as well — that we can face hard days together, knowing we are never alone.

We are urging firms, councils and public spaces to do what they can to open up places where people can be together.

US President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill are expected to fly in

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queen's journey from westminster to windsor

Queen Elizabeth II's final journey - the route coffin will take from Balmoral to London

The United Kingdom will bid farewell to its longest serving monarch Queen Elizabeth II on Monday as she begins one last journey from Balmoral down to London for her state funeral

queen's journey from westminster to windsor

  • 21:55, 10 Sep 2022
  • Updated 14:46, 11 Sep 2022

The Queen will on Sunday begin her final journey as her coffin travels to Edinburgh before being flown to London ahead of her state funeral .

Thousands are expected to queue through the night to pay their last respects.

The plans were unveiled as it was revealed on Saturday night that Queen Elizabeth’s state funeral will be held on Monday next week – which has also been declared a bank holiday.

Six gatekeepers who had “a personal relationship” with the monarch will this morning carry her oak coffin from the Ballroom at Balmoral Castle, where she died, to a hearse for a journey of just over 100 miles.

On Sunday afternoon she will be received at the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh – the monarch’s official Scottish residence – by a Guard of Honour formed by The Royal ­Regiment of Scotland.

The journey, normally around two hours, will take three times as long to allow wellwishers to share their grief along the route.

A military bearer party from the regiment will carry the coffin to the Throne Room, where it will remain until Monday afternoon to allow palace staff to pay respects.

On Monday, King Charles and Camilla will travel to the city to join members of the Royal Family in a walking procession, taking the coffin at 2.35pm along Edinburgh’s Royal Mile from the Palace to St Giles’ Cathedral.

The hearse will be flanked by a detachment of The King’s Body Guard for Scotland, the Royal Company of Archers.

The Crown of Scotland will be placed on the coffin as it is carried inside. There, she will lie at rest until Tuesday – the first opportunity for the public to pay their respects.

On Saturday night the Earl Marshal, The Duke of Norfolk – responsible for State occasions – said: “We will carry out our duty with the heaviest of hearts. But also with the firmest of resolve to ensure a fitting farewell to one of the defining figures of our times.”

On Tuesday evening, Princess Anne will accompany her mother’s body on an RAF flight back to London and on to Buckingham Palace, to be greeted by Charles and Camilla.

On Wednesday at 2.22pm, adorned with the Imperial State Crown, the coffin will be taken in procession on a Gun Carriage of the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery to the Palace of Westminster, where she will lie in state in Westminster Hall for four days.

Hundreds of thousands of mourners are expected to line the route of the silent procession, similar to the state funeral of her father, King George VI, in 1952.

The Queen will lie in state until 6.30am on Monday, when the coffin will be taken to Westminster Abbey for her state funeral.

After the funeral she will travel to Windsor Castle, where she will be laid to rest in St George’s Chapel alongside Prince Philip.

The route the coffin will take

Details of the route the Queen's coffin will take from Balmoral to Edinburgh have been revealed.

The cortege is expected to leave the castle on Royal Deeside - where the Queen died on Thursday - at 10am on Sunday morning.

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said the "poignant" journey, which will see the Queen's coffin transported to the Palace of Holyroodhouse, would give the public a chance to come together to "mark our country's shared loss".

Wellwishers are expected to gather along the route the cortege will take as it travels from Balmoral to the Scottish capital. It will first head to the nearby town on Ballater, where it is expected at approximately 10.12am.

It is then expected to arrive in Aberdeen about an hour later, with tributes expected to be paid in the city's Duthie Park.

Travelling south along the A90, it will then arrive in Dundee at about 2pm.

In Edinburgh, Ms Sturgeon and other party leaders in Scotland are expected to observe the coffin as it goes past the Scottish Parliament.

From there it will be taken into the Palace of Holyroodhouse, where it will remain for the night.

Transport bosses said an "unprecedented" amount of preparation and planning had gone into drawing up the route, which marks the start of the Queen's last journey.

Ms Sturgeon stated: "Her Majesty's death at Balmoral Castle means Scotland has lost one of its most dedicated and beloved servants.

"The grief we have seen across the world has been profound and deeply touching. It will be especially poignant to see Her Majesty's coffin begin its journey from her Aberdeenshire home to the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh.

"This is a chance for people to gather together publicly and begin to mark our country's shared loss."

The First Minister added: "We anticipate many, many people will be keen to pay their respects and we ask them to observe public safety messaging to ensure the safety of all."

Transport Scotland operations manager Stein Connelly echoed that - as he warned road closures on Sunday could result in delays and disruption.

He urged those planning to come and see the coffin on its journey to "please plan ahead and use public transport where possible"

Mr Connelly added: "If you absolutely have to travel by car, allow extra time and only park within designated areas."

He continued: "This is an event of unprecedented scale. Even the recent Cop26 gathering in Glasgow cannot match the amount of preparation and planning that has gone into this operation."

Well-wishers are being asked by police not to leave vehicles by the roadside, as this could pose a risk to public safety, with people instead being encouraged to park in designated car parks.

Police Scotland Deputy Chief Constable Malcolm Graham said policing has "an important role to play" over the coming days.

He said: "The loss of Her Majesty The Queen is deeply felt and policing has an important role to play in the coming days to ensure ceremonial events take place safely and with dignity.

"Our priority is public safety and we are working with partners, including the UK and Scottish governments, as well as local authorities, to support the delivery of planned events."

Mr Graham added that the authorities are working with businesses to plan ahead for any potential disruption as a result of the events.

He added: "We understand that the public will want to show their respects to Her Majesty and we would urge them to do so safely."

After the coffin arrives at the Palace of Holyroodhouse on Sunday, it will rest in the Throne Room until the afternoon of Monday.

It will then travel in a procession to St Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh, along the Royal Mile with the King and the late Queen's other children the Princess Royal, the Duke of York and the Earl of Wessex following behind on foot, along with Anne's husband Admiral Sir Tim Laurence.

Camilla, now Queen Consort, and the Countess of Wessex will follow by car and also attend the service in St Giles'.

You can leave your tributes to Queen Elizabeth II here

This weekend, the Daily Mirror and Sunday Mirror celebrate the life of Her Majesty the Queen with a commemorative special filled with all the key moments from Britain’s longest reigning monarch. Be sure to pick up your copy of the Daily Mirror and Sunday Mirror to get both pullouts.

MORE ON The Queen Commonwealth Royal Family Balmoral Sunday Mirror The Queen's funeral

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Horse that led Queen's funeral procession to Windsor Castle dies

A retired police horse that lead the Queen's state funeral procession to Windsor Castle in her last day of service has died aged 13.

Aurora led the funeral procession down the Long Walk on 19 September 2022.

Known by officers as "Doris", the grey shire horse joined Thames Valley Police's (TVP) mounted section in 2015.

TVP's Mounted Section said Aurora "had such a sweet nature" and was a "big gentle giant... who always did a good job of keeping us on our toes."

Ahead of leading the procession into Windsor Castle, before her retirement, TVP Windsor and Maidenhead said it was "extremely proud" Aurora's last deployment representing the force was for such a historic event.

The 18-hands (6ft) high horse had been in the care of the Horse Trust since retiring due to being lame.

The force said: "We cannot thank them enough for the wonderful retirement she got to enjoy.

"Gallop pain-free sweet girl and thank you for your service."

Aurora was also on duty at the wedding of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, escorted royalty at Royal Ascot and worked at numerous football matches and music concerts.

"Aurora had such a sweet nature, she was another big, gentle giant of ours who generally looked after the newer riders but always did a good job of keeping us on our toes," TVP's Mounted Section said in a tribute on X .

The Horse Trust said Aurora who "could be spotted in the field easily, like a glorious marble statue, both stoic and stunning" was put to sleep after suffering a ruptured ligament.

The charity said: "Due to her other diagnoses and sheer size, this severely limited her prognosis and any treatment options available would have severely impacted her quality of life to undertake.

"Therefore, it was decided to let Aurora be at peace and run pain free."

The charity added Aurora had fitted "straight into our herd of retirees... made many friends both equine and human due to her placid nature.

"Her gentle character and striking size and beauty made hers a popular stable door for our visitors to linger at, as Aurora almost always had her head out and was ready for the strokes and adoration she so deserved in her retirement."

Follow BBC South on Facebook , X , or Instagram . Send your story ideas to [email protected] .

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Katy Perry 'Ran Straight Into' King Charles and Queen Camilla in Windsor Castle: 'Wrong Way!'

The singer and 'American Idol' judge performed at the Coronation Concert in May

Brendan Le is an Editorial Intern at PEOPLE with three years of experience working as an editor and writer.

queen's journey from westminster to windsor

Katy Perry is opening up about her royal stay in Windsor Castle during King Charles and Queen Camilla ’s coronation celebrations in May.

On Monday night’s episode of Jimmy Kimmel Live! , the American Idol judge, 39, told the host that the royal family allowed her and her mother to stay in the royal residence in Windsor while she attended the crowning ceremony and performed at the Coronation Concert.

"I brought my mother because, I mean, that’s like the best gift you could ever give your mom,” Perry said on the talk show.

She recalled that after the ceremony, she and her glam team rushed through the palace to meet up with the King and Queen for an American Idol segment .

"Everyone was running,” the “Teenage Dream” singer said after explaining that she was supposed to take certain routes through the castle. “I ran straight into them, and I was like, ‘Oh, went the wrong way!’ ” 

Crediting fellow American Idol judge Lionel Richie for pulling together the bit, Perry said that Richie, 74, “could convince anyone to do anything.”

Kimmel, 56, also had Perry address a viral video of her looking lost at the coronation . Dressed in an all-lavender ensemble , the singer appeared confused while searching for her seat.

"There’s no assigned seating,” she explained.

“It’s general admission?” said a surprised Kimmel. Aside from “the first two rows,” Perry confirmed the Westminster Abbey coronation had open seating for most of the 2,200 guests.

"Were the people you sat in front of happy to be behind that hat?” he asked, referring to the statement fascinator that covered half the singer’s face. The singer shook her head to indicate "no."

Gareth Cattermole/Getty

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At Windsor Castle’s Coronation Concert the day after the crowning ceremony, broadcast live from the grounds of Windsor with a stunning castle backdrop, Perry performed signature hits “Roar” and “Firework” in a custom Vivienne Westwood ballgown . Princess Charlotte was spotted singing along to the performance.

Richie, Andrea Bocelli , Take That, Olly Murs, Nicole Scherzinger and Paloma Faith also took the stage for the show. 

 Kin Cheung-WPA Pool/Getty

The “California Gurls” singer is no stranger to performing for the world’s biggest stages. In 2021, she performed at President Joe Biden’s inauguration , and in 2015, she headlined the Super Bowl XLIX halftime show . 

Her husband Orlando Bloom , with whom she shares one daughter , had nothing but praise for his wife’s opportunities. “She does those big, historical things. It's wonderful. She sang for the president too. She does that," the actor told Entertainment Tonight . “What’s left? Maybe the pope.”

Perry is looking toward the future too. In her Kimmel interview, she revealed that she would be departing from Idol after the current season. The singer has hinted at new music coming soon, calling 2024 “a very, very exciting year … for all popstar girlies!”

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The Telegraph

The ultimate royal travel guide to Britain, from Buckingham Palace to Windsor Castle

T he British landscape is awash with royal properties, from stately palaces to historic castles. These include three of the monarch’s official royal residences; Buckingham Palace , Windsor Castle , and Edinburgh’s Palace of Holyroodhouse. 

But while these historic buildings may have the level of grandeur you might imagine when you picture the Royal family at home, in truth, royals are only ‘resident’ in these buildings on occasion. For some, they are even considered business premises – though they rather put the rest of our offices to shame. 

When it comes to days off from official business, members of the Royal family are more likely to be found in their private homes, such as the King and Queen’s Highgrove House in Gloucestershire, or the Prince and Princess of Wales’s family home of Adelaide Cottage in Windsor Home Park. 

While the private homes are exactly that – private – there are plenty of places around Britain where you can walk in the footsteps of the Royal family and get a small glimpse into their lives. Here are some of the best. 

Buckingham Palace, London

Let’s start with the most famous of all royal residences: Buckingham Palace. Elizabeth II largely regarded it as her office, spending weekdays there attending to official business before retreating to Windsor at the weekends.

Now, of course, the palace – whose origins can be traced back to the reign of King James I in the early 17 th century, but which has been the London home of British monarchs since 1837 when Queen Victoria moved in – is the King’s official London residence.

Buckingham Palace is the setting for royal and national celebrations and commemorations; who can forget catching a glimpse of Royal family members from the famous balcony? It’s also where the monarch hosts dignitaries and official banquets – on September 18 2022, the King held a reception for world leaders at the palace on the eve of his mother’s funeral.

As it is a working palace, Buckingham Palace is only open to the public at set times. For 10 weeks each summer, its grand state rooms are opened up. During this time, visitors can see the crimson-and-gold Throne Room, the Royal Mews, and the enormous Ballroom, where all those extravagant state banquets are held. In addition, there are exclusive guided tours at select dates throughout the year.

Those without a ticket or travelling at the wrong time of year can still watch the spectacle of the Changing of the Guard, which takes place outside the palace several days a week at 10.45am (weather dependent but check the schedule ). 

The ceremony has its roots in the reign of King Henry VI and sees the New Guard of soldiers – wearing the customary bearskin hats – march to Buckingham Palace from St James’s Palace and Wellington Barracks accompanied by music. They parade in front of the palace and relieve the ‘Old Guard’ (the soldiers on duty). 

If you are lucky and the King is in residence (the Royal Standard flag will be flying) then there will be an even higher number of sentries than normal taking part in the ceremony.

How to do it

Buckingham Palace (0303 123 7300) is open for 10 weeks each summer (July 14–September 24 2023). The Goring (read our review here ) has double rooms from £710 including breakfast.

Windsor Castle, Windsor

At the start of the Covid pandemic, Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip retreated to this castle on the banks of the River Thames to shield with 22 staff members in what became known as ‘HMS Bubble’. After Prince Philip’s death in April 2021, the late Queen remained at Windsor; indeed, she never spent another night at Buckingham Palace.

The castle was originally built for William the Conqueror to defend London from western approaches, but it became a royal palace under King Henry I. Subsequent monarchs extended the palace with its most ambitious makeover undertaken by King Charles II who wanted to emulate the opulence of his cousin Louis XIV’s Palace of Versailles.

As well as seeing the rich interiors of the castle, visitors can pay their respects to the late Queen by visiting her final resting place within the King George VI Memorial Chapel inside St George’s Chapel.

In 2022, the Prince and Princess of Wales moved to nearby Adelaide Cottage in Windsor Home Park with their three children – Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis – who attend school locally. It may well be that they will eventually move into the castle itself.

Windsor Castle (0303 123 7300) is open daily (summer). Castle Hotel Windsor (read our review here ) has double rooms from £132 including breakfast.

Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh

The King’s official residence in Scotland, the Palace of Holyroodhouse is a rather grand building that sits at the opposite end of Edinburgh’s Royal Mile to the castle. The palace has links with many famous figures from Scottish history – including Bonnie Prince Charlie, who set up court here in 1745 – but the person most visitors want to hear about is Mary, Queen of Scots. Her bedroom can be reached via a winding staircase in the north-west tower of the palace, and is a delight to discover with its low doorway (despite Mary being around 6ft-tall), decorative oak ceiling and painted frieze.

The reigning monarch stays at the palace every year during Holyrood Week (or Royal Week) from late June to early July. During this time they take part in the symbolic Ceremony of the Keys in which the monarch is handed the keys to the city of Edinburgh by the Lord Provost amid much pomp and ceremony.

The Palace of Holyroodhouse (0303 123 7306) is open daily July-Sept; it’s closed Tue-Wed in all other months. Cheval Old Town Chambers (read our review here ) has double rooms from £190 including breakfast.

Highgrove House, Gloucestershire

When they are not on official duties, the King and Queen love nothing better than to return to their countryside home of Highgrove in the Cotswolds. As the house is a private home, you can’t peek behind its neoclassical façade, but tours of the exquisite gardens – which Charles has dedicated himself to creating since buying the property in 1980 – are lovely. 

An experienced guide will take you through the gardens, which are a real passion project of His Majesty. You will then be led to the Ante Room, where bespoke Highgrove products – including food and drink made from produce grown here – can be bought and artworks by the King himself admired. This is all followed by cream tea in the Orchard Room, making it an idyllic way to spend an afternoon.

Highgrove is open on select dates for tours between April and September. Calcot & Spa (read the review here ) has double rooms from £364 including breakfast.

Llwynywermod, Llandovery

The Royal family also has a Welsh home. When he was Prince of Wales, Charles bought the 192-acre estate of Llwynywermod in Carmarthenshire, Wales, in 2006. Comprising a farmhouse building, where he and Camilla would regularly holiday, and three cottages, Charles soon set about renovating the house and its adjoining properties in a greener way, using locally sourced materials. 

On Charles’ ascension to the throne, the property was passed on to William, the new Prince of Wales, and Catherine, Princess of Wales, who also have a strong affection for the Welsh countryside, having spent some of the early years of their marriage living in Anglesey.

What’s special about here is that two of the cottages are available for holiday lets – North Range, for instance, is a beautiful whitewashed converted barn that sleeps six guests across three bedrooms and comes with a flagstone floor, open fire, Welsh furniture and lots of character. The smaller West Range sleeps four guests.

North Range and West Range can be booked through the Duchy of Cornwall (01579 346 473) and cost from £1,225 per week.

Balmoral, Aberdeenshire

Elizabeth II spent her final weeks in Balmoral and this palace in the Highlands was reputedly her favourite home. 

She is not the only royal to have felt an affinity for the place. Queen Victoria, who fell in love with the Highlands during her very first visit in 1842, was the first monarch to call it home. She and Albert loved to escape public life here, embarking on expeditions incognito through the Highlands. 

The late Queen spent every summer at Balmoral (August–October) and she would regularly be joined by other members of the Royal family. When the monarch is not in residence, the site is open to visitors. 

Although you can only see a small section of the castle’s interiors – including the ballroom where Ghillies Balls have historically been held – it’s the majestic setting amid acres of greenery with views across to the Cairngorms that makes a visit here worthwhile. 

The Royal family are considered locals in the nearby village of Ballater and are regularly seen attending services at nearby Crathie Kirk. Indeed in April 2023, Charles and Camilla surprised residents by making an unexpected visit to a new fishmongers and restaurant in the village during a pre-Coronation holiday at Balmoral.

Balmoral (01339 742 534) is open for pre-booked self-guided tours every summer (1 April to 16 Aug 2023). The Fife Arms (read the review here ) has double rooms from £250 including breakfast.

Read more about where the Royal family like to holiday here .

Sandringham, Norfolk

The Royal family traditionally spends Christmas at the sprawling estate of Sandringham. The private country retreat has been a popular haunt since 1862, when the Jacobean house was built for King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra while Edward’s mother was still on the throne.

It was also a favourite of King Charles III’s grandfather, King George VI, and great-grandfather, King George V, who both died here. The house and gardens are a joy to explore. Norfolk is also where Anmer Hall, another of William and Catherine’s homes, is located.

Sandringham (01485 544 112) is open Sat-Thu (summer). The Brisley Bell (read the review here ) has double rooms from £133 including breakfast.

Royal Yacht Britannia, Edinburgh

Until 1997 the Royal family would take annual holidays around Scotland’s Western Isles aboard the Royal Yacht Britannia . After the yacht was decommissioned, it was docked in the seaside Edinburgh suburb of Leith in Edinburgh and has since become one of Scotland’s most popular attractions.

A tour of the yacht allows you to peer into the bedroom that Queen Elizabeth II slept in while on board and reveals a glimpse of what life in the Royal family is like when the eyes of the world are not upon them. The late Queen clearly missed her days on board; after the yacht was no longer available to her, she chartered the Hebridean Princess , which offers small-ship cruises, on two separate occasions for special celebrations.

The Royal Yacht Britannia (0131 555 5566) is open daily (summer). Fingal (read the review here ) is a luxurious floating hotel nearby. It has double rooms from £300 including breakfast. The Hebridean Princess (01756 704 704) offers cruises from March to November with prices from £4,420pp for seven nights).

Read more about the travels of Elizabeth II here .

Kensington Palace, London

This west London mansion was the beloved home of Princess Diana and both the Diana Memorial Fountain and the Diana Memorial Playground can be found in its gardens. Apartment 1a is still the London pad of the Prince of Wales and his family. 

For many years, Kensington was known for the magnificent balls that were held across its ornate interconnected rooms and began in the late 17 th century during the era of King William and Mary. The already grandiose interiors were later added to by the Georgians when Kensington became the hub of high society. Elaborate decoration, such as the painted walls around the King’s Staircase which features many characters from George I’s court, were also added. 

As well as standard tours of the palace, regular exhibitions draw on its rich history, telling the stories of past and present royals in new and dynamic ways. Victoria: A Royal Childhood tells the story of one of the palace’s most famous residents. Queen Victoria was born here and the exhibition includes personal items such as her doll house. Other rolling exhibitions let visitors see precious items from the palace’s archive; often including iconic outfits worn by various members of the Royal family.

Kensington Palace (0333 320 6000) is open Wed–Sun (summer).  Baglioni (read the review here ), opposite Kensington Gardens, has double rooms from £494 including breakfast.

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From stately palaces to historic castles, there are plenty of places where you can walk in the footsteps of the Royal family - Getty

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  1. Queen Elizabeth's Final Journey Through The Streets Of London

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  2. What time does the Queen arrive in Windsor? Route map from Westminster

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  3. Queen Elizabeth's Funeral: Coffin Makes Final Journey From Westminster

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  4. Queen Elizabeth's Final Journey Through The Streets Of London

    queen's journey from westminster to windsor

  5. Queen Elizabeth II travels to Westminster

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  6. Queen's final journey: Royal route from Wellington Arch to Windsor for

    queen's journey from westminster to windsor

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