Partner Visa Subclass 820/801 and Subclass 309/100 visas: Frequently Asked Questions

  • September 7, 2023

A Partner visa (subclass 820/801 and subclass 309/100) is a pathway specifically designed for the partner or spouse of an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen to live in Australia. Whether you are currently in Australia or overseas, planning to apply for a partner visa, or have already started the process, this article compiles the most frequently asked questions about the partner visa process.

What is the difference between the partner subclass 820/801 and subclass 309/100 visas?

There are two types of partner visas, depending on whether the visa applicant is onshore or offshore:

  • Partner visa (subclass 820/801) (apply in Australia)
  • Partner visa (subclass 309/100) (apply outside Australia)

Both visas have a temporary stage followed by a permanent stage.

What are the eligibility criteria for the partner visa?

If you have a partner who is an Australian citizen, an Australian permanent resident, or an eligible New Zealand citizen, you may be eligible to apply for a partner visa.

A partner visa application is in 2 parts:

  • Visa application lodged on behalf of the visa applicant
  • Sponsorship application to be lodged on behalf of the sponsoring partner

The eligibility criteria for a partner visa are as follows:

  • Relationship requirement:
  • You must be the spouse (married) or de facto partner of an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen
  • Your relationship must be genuine and continuing
  • While you are in Australia, you can apply for the subclass 820/801 visa
  • While you are outside Australia, you can apply for the subclass 309/100 visa
  • Your partner must be an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen
  • You must meet the legal age limit for marriage or a de facto relationship according to Australian law
  • You must have a suitable sponsor who meets the requirements and is willing to provide sponsorship for your visa application
  • You must meet the health and character requirements set by the Australian government. This typically involves undergoing a medical examination and providing character references or police clearance certificates

Please keep in mind that these are general eligibility criteria, and each case has unique circumstances. It is advisable to seek personalised advice to ensure that you meet all the specific requirements for your partner visa.

Can I apply for a partner visa if I am in a de facto relationship?

Yes, both subclass 820/801 and subclass 309/100 visas are available for applicants in de facto relationships, including same-sex relationships.

Is there a minimum duration for a de facto relationship before applying for a partner visa?

Generally, a de facto relationship should have existed for at least 12 months before the visa application is lodged. However, exceptions exist for compelling and compassionate circumstances or if the relationship is registered under Australian law.

Do I need to provide evidence of a genuine relationship?

Yes, evidence of a genuine and ongoing relationship is a crucial requirement for partner visa applications. This may include documents such as joint bank statements, joint leases or mortgages, shared bills, photographs, travel records, personal relationship statements, and statements from friends and family.

How will I then apply for the permanent partner visa (subclass 100/801)?

The Partner visa is a two-stage process. The visa applicant will initially be granted the temporary partner visa (subclass 309/820), and they will be eligible for the permanent partner visa (subclass 100/801) after 2 years since the provisional visa application was submitted.

If the applicant has been in a relationship with the sponsor for more than 3 years with no children, or 2 years with dependent children of the relationship, the 2 year temporary visa period may be waived and a permanent visa may be granted.

What can I do with a temporary partner visa (subclass 820/309)?

With this provisional visa, you are granted certain rights and privileges that allow you to live, work, and study in Australia. Here is what you can do with this visa:  

  • ,You can live in Australia until your permanent Partner visa application is finalised
  • You have unrestricted work rights, which means that you can work in any occupation and for any employer in Australia
  • You can enrol in educational courses and pursue studies in Australia
  • You will be eligible to enrol in Australia’s healthcare scheme called Medicare
  • You can travel in and out of Australia as many times as you want while the temporary partner visa is valid
  • You may be eligible to attend free English language classes provided by the Adult Migrant English Program

How much does it cost to apply for a Partner (subclass 820/801 or 309/100) visa?

From 1 July 2023, the Visa Application Charges for the partner visa are:

  • Primary applicant: $8,850
  • Each secondary applicant (at least 18): $4,430
  • Each secondary applicant (under 18): $2,215

These fees may be subject to changes in the future as the Australian government generally increases the fees in line with CPI each financial year.

What is the character requirement for the sponsor of a partner visa?

The character requirement for the sponsor of a partner visa is an assessment of their character to ensure they are suitable to sponsor their partner for migration to Australia. The Australian government places importance on protecting the community and upholding the values of integrity and good character in the migration process.

The character assessment for sponsors involves considering various factors, including but not limited to:

  • Any criminal convictions, including both spent and unspent convictions
  • Previous immigration violations or breaches
  • Evidence of association with criminal or illegal activities
  • Prior history of domestic violence or violence against women or children
  • Any history of non-compliance with Australian laws, regulations, or obligations
  • Any previous sponsorship undertakings not honoured
  • Any adverse information or intelligence about the sponsor

Is there an English language requirement for the partner visa?

Currently, there is no specific English language requirement for the partner visa.    

How long does it take to process subclass 820/309 visa?

Visa processing time can vary for a range of reasons, including:

  • The completeness of your application, including all necessary supporting documents.
  • Your responsiveness in providing additional information when requested.
  • The duration required to conduct necessary checks on the provided supporting information.
  • The time taken to obtain additional information from external agencies, particularly concerning health, character, and national security requirements.
  • The availability of vacancies in the migration program.

You can find an official guide on the Department’s website over  here .  

Can I add family members to the visa application?

Yes, you can make a combined application with your dependent children as secondary applicants to your partner (subclass 820/801 or 309/100) visa application.

You cannot add family members to your visa application after the subclass 820/309 visa is granted. If you have been granted a subclass 820 visa and would like to include a dependent child in your permanent visa application before finalisation of the 801/100 partner visa, you can apply for a Dependent Child visa (subclass 445). By obtaining a subclass 445 for your child, you can then include them in your permanent Partner visa application.

What do I do if my relationship with my sponsoring partner has ended?

If your relationship with your sponsoring partner has ended before the finalization of your permanent Partner visa, you must inform the Department of Home Affairs about the change in your relationship status.

It is highly recommended to consult a registered migration agent or lawyer to understand your options and how the change in your relationship status may impact your visa status. We can provide guidance tailored to your specific circumstances and help you navigate the process.

You may still be eligible for a permanent visa, if you are a holder of a 820/309 visa, or have applied for a 820 visa, and one of the following is applicable to you:

  • Your relationship has ended because your partner has passed away
  • You have a biological child from the relationship
  • You suffered family violence, committed by your partner, while in the relationship

Final thoughts

There are different types of partner visas, which are dependent on whether the visa applicant is onshore or offshore. For onshore applicants who apply in Australia, the relevant visa application is a subclass 820/801. For offshore applicants who are applying outside of Australia, the relevant visa application is a subclass 309/100 visa.

Navigating the partner visa process can be a complex and often emotional journey. While the temporary partner visa grants you the opportunity to live, work, study, and access healthcare in Australia, it’s important to understand the two-stage process. After the provisional visa, you become eligible for the permanent visa, which solidifies your permanent residency status.

Each case is unique, and seeking tailored advice from registered migration agents or legal professionals is highly recommended. We can guide you through the process, help you gather the necessary evidence, and present a compelling case to the Department of Home Affairs.

Contact us  today to schedule a consultation and learn more about how we can assist you on your immigration journey.

This newsletter should not be construed as legal advice and to obtain current information, please seek the advice of an immigration professional.

Have more specific questions about your visa? Get in touch with Migration Affairs today.

Seek expert guidance on Australian immigration queries; our trusted specialists are here for you every step of the way

PHONE: +61 2 8226 8777

EMAIL: info@migrationaffairs.com.au

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  • Migration Info Centre

What Are The Requirements For Spouse Visa In Australia

If you are married to an Australian citizen or permanent resident, or an eligible New Zealand citizen, you may be eligible for a spouse visa, which provides a pathway to permanent residence in Australia.  Note that a spouse visa is referred to as a  partner visa  in the migration provisions as you do not need to be in a married relationhsip to be eligible, i.e. de facto couples may also qualify for a partner visa. Accordingly, the terms ‘partner’ and ‘spouse’ are used interchangeably in this article.

Read on to learn about what are the requirements for a spouse visa in Australia and how to apply for a spouse visa Australia.

What Is The Application Process For A Spouse Visa?

A spouse visa can either be lodged onshore or from outside Australia. To apply for a spouse visa Australia onshore, eligible applicants must lodge a Subclass 820/801 Partner visa   application. The equivalent offshore  spouse visa application Australia  is the Subclass 309/100 Partner visa .

Both the onshore and offshore spouse visa applications consist of a two-stage process. The first step is to lodge a combined application for both a temporary and permanent residence partner visa.

Note that you can apply for an offshore partner visa application if you intend to marry an  Australian citizen or permanent resident, or an eligible New Zealand citizen, provided the intended marriage will, if it takes place, be a valid marriage in accordance with the migration provisions. Importantly, the marriage must have taken place before the temporary subclass 309 visa can be granted. This is designed a situation where you are planning to marry outside Australia. If instead you intend to marry your Australian partner in Australia, you should apply for the Subclass 300 Prospective Marriage visa. 

Get More Information About The Prospective Marriage Visa

To learn more about the prospective marriage visa, we recommend that you refer to our detailed guide on the temporary  Subclass 300 Prospective Marriage visa where you can learn about the specific eligibility requirements, costs, timing, how to apply, and documents required to be submitted with your application.

We have also prepared a series of articles which are designed to provide you with further information about the prospective marriage visa process and how it works. We recommend that you refer to the articles below to learn more.

Overview – Partner Visa Australia

Prospective Marriage Visa Subclass 300

Prospective Marriage Visa

Temporary Spouse Visa

If your application for a temporary partner visa is successful, you will be granted a temporary visa at the initial stage.

As an onshore subclass 820 partner visa applicant, this will allow you to remain in Australia whilst you await processing of your permanent residence visa application.

If you lodge offshore, you may enter Australia upon grant of the temporary Subclass 309 partner visa to await processing of the final stage of your spouse visa application Australia.

As a temporary partner visa holder, you will be able to access Medicare (Australia’s public health care system). You can also work, study and travel to and from Australia on an unrestricted basis. Additionally, you will be eligible for unlimited hours of English language classes until you reach vocational English, which is provided through the Adult Migrant English Program .

Onshore Visa Grants Due To COVID-19 Travel Restrictions

An exemption has be introduced to allow for the onshore grant of the Subclass 309 Partner visa for applicants who are in Australia and are unable to travel offshore to be granted their visa due to COVID-19 travel restrictions.

This temporary change to the visa grant requirements commenced on 27 February 2021.

This means that If you applied for a Partner outside Australia before the end of the COVID-19 concession period, but you are in Australia during this period, the visa can be granted onshore if you meet all other visa requirements.

Applicants who are outside Australia and who meet the normal visa grant requirements will be able to be granted the visa offshore, in accordance with the current process.

The COVID-19 concession period commenced on 1 February 2020 and is a temporary arrangement. An end date is yet to be announced.

Applicants who come to Australia after the end of the COVID-19 concession period will not be able to be granted their visa whilst they are onshore, in line with the usual requirements.

Permanent Spouse Visa

Processing of your permanent residence spouse visa application Australia will then commence following two years of lodgement of your application, however, given the average processing times being experienced by the Department of Home Affairs (the Department), it is unlikely that processing will occur at this 2-year mark. Note that processing times change periodically, but you can typically expect at least a 3 ½ to 4 year wait for the entire process to be completed.

The two-year wait period discussed above does not apply if, at the time the visa application was made, you and your spouse were in a long-term relationship . This means a minimum of 2 years if you and your spouse have a dependent child (other than a stepchild), or 3 years in any other case.

Keep in mind that application processing times do change from time-to-time based on a range of factors, including internal Departmental systems and processing priorities. Actual processing times can also be affected by factors relating to the individual circumstances of each application. Where there are more complex issued involved, shortfalls or gaps/inconsistencies in information and/or documents provided to the Department, or if there are questions or doubts raised about the veracity of claims made in an application, these types of issues are likely to result in an application taking longer to decide. This may involve the Department investigating individual matters further to satisfy itself that all relevant visa grant requirements have been satisfied, which can result in a longer wait time to reach a decision.

The good news is that there are things you can do to both maximise your chances of achieving a successful result and to prevent further processing delays in the Department deciding your application. In this article, we provide some useful tips on the steps you can take to improve your chances of having a partner visa granted and in the quickest possible time.

But first, we start with an overview of the main A ustralia spouse visa requirements  that you will need to meet to qualify for a partner visa.

Key Requirements To Qualify For A Spouse Visa

Your relationship.

One of the most important criteria that applies to a partner visa is whether your marriage meets the definition of a spouse relationship in accordance with the migration provisions. Presenting a marriage certificate alone to the Department is not sufficient evidence to meet this requirement.

Your marriage must be legally valid under Australian law (which will be most relevant for marriages that take place outside Australia). A minimum age requirement of 18 generally applies, however this is lowered to age 16 if certain requirements are met.

Same-sex marriages are legally recognised in Australia and are therefore also eligible for grant of a partner visa on the basis of marriage (provided all other requirements are satisfied).

The definition of a spouse relationship also requires you to demonstrate that you and your Australian spouse have a mutual commitment to a shared life as a married couple, to the exclusion of all others , that your relationship is genuine and continuing , and that you are not living separately and apart on a permanent basis.

In assessing whether you meet this definition, the Department will examine the financial and social aspects of your relationship, the nature of your household and of your commitment to one another. Practically speaking, this means demonstrating things like:

  • jointly owning real estate and/or other major assets, joint responsibility for a lease or mortgage and/or a joint bank account ( financial aspect);
  • the relationship being known to third parties, having friends in common, receiving joint invitations, attending social events and travelling together ( social aspect);
  • sharing a household and domestic responsibilities, caring for and supporting children (where applicable), household bills and other mailed correspondence either in joint names or addressed to you individually at the same address ( household aspect); and
  • your intention to be in a committed, long-term and exclusive married relationship, having knowledge of each other’s background, family situation or other personal details, the terms of your wills, your superannuation beneficiary and maintaining contact for any periods spent apart ( commitment aspect).

The above is not an exhaustive list but are just some examples of the types of things to consider when gathering your evidence. Each relationship is different, and that means that the documents that you should provide will depend on the individual circumstances of your own relationship. The important thing is that, as part of your application, you supply strong supporting evidence to demonstrate that you meet the above definition of a spouse relationship. If you are unable to show the existence of one or more of these factors, you should provide adequate explanations and where possible, supporting documentation to explain their absence from your relationship. Although the Department recognises the fact that each marriage is individual and unique, it does generally expect to see most relationships in contemporary Australia exhibiting the above factors. If your marriage does not clearly feature these elements, you can expect more scrutiny by the Department. Providing detailed explanations and evidence to address these issues upfront at time of lodgement of your application will help to avoid further delay and questions being raised on the veracity of your claims. We recommend that you refer to our detailed guide on the evidentiary requirements for a partner visa, to help ensure that you cover off on all relevant aspects, as they apply to your own situation.

You and your spouse should also each prepare detailed and comprehensive written statements (which are signed and dated) and include the following details:

  • How, when and where you first met;
  • How your relationship developed;
  • When you moved in together;
  • When you got engaged;
  • When you married;
  • A description of your domestic life together (how you support each other financially, physically and emotionally);
  • A description of any periods in which you were separated (provide details on when and why this occurred and how you maintained your relationship during that time);
  • Significant events in your relationship; and
  • Your plans for your future life together.

These statements provide an opportunity for you and your spouse to fully explain the circumstances of your relationship and how you meet the relevant definition of a spouse relationship, which is one of the most crucial elements that will determine whether you qualify for grant of a partner visa.

If you apply for an offshore subclass 309 visa on the basis of your intention to marry your Australian partner before visa grant, you should submit supporting documents to evidence that you made arrangements to marry your partner. This should indicate the intended date of the marriage.

Sponsorship

Another key spouse visa requirement for a partner visa to be granted is for your Australian spouse to be approved as your sponsor . To qualify, your spouse will need to meet specified requirements and if approved, will be subject to sponsorship obligations. This includes agreeing to support you (as the visa holder) by providing accommodation and financial assistance for the first 2 years following visa grant.

An age requirement also applies, whereby your sponsor is required to be at least 18 years of age at time of application. If this is not the case, your spouse may still be able to sponsor you provided that their parent or guardian (who themselves must be aged at least 18 years and be an Australian citizen or permanent resident, or an eligible New Zealand citizen) sponsors you for the partner visa.

Under the current Australia spouse visa requirements, partner visa and sponsorship applications can be lodged and assessed by the Department concurrently. But changes are coming, meaning that your spouse will first need to apply for and be granted sponsorship approval before you can lodge your partner visa application. This change can have serious implications, especially for onshore applicants as it means a further delay in the lodgement process. If you are planning to apply onshore, be mindful that once this change is enacted, you will need to carefully plan your lodgement timeline to ensure that you can validly lodge your application by the time the sponsorship approval comes through. Otherwise, you risk having to depart Australia and instead lodge your application offshore. Getting the timing right will therefore be even more critical in planning your visa pathway to achieving permanent residence in Australia. Talk to us for information and advice that is tailored to suit your personal situation, thus ensuring that you have a plan that works best for you.

Other Requirements

In addition to the  spouse visa requirements  discussed above, you will also need to meet health and character criteria for a partner visa to be granted. There are also other more specific criteria that apply in certain circumstances only, such as for onshore applicants who do not hold a substantive visa at the time of lodgement of their application (a substantive visa is any visa excluding a bridging visa , criminal justice or enforcement visa).

An additional requirement for onshore partner visa applications is outlined below.

If you apply onshore and you either hold, or the last substantive visa that you held was one of the following:

  • Subclass 495 Skilled Independent Regional (Provisional) visa;
  • Subclass 475 Skilled Regional Sponsored visa;
  • Subclass 487 Skilled Regional Sponsored visa; or
  • Subclass 489 Skilled Regional Sponsored (Provisional) visa;

you must have held that visa for at least 2 years.

If an onshore application is made and you either hold, or the last substantive visa that you held was one of the following:

  • Subclass 491 Skilled Work Regional (Provisional) visa ; or
  • Subclass 494 Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (Provisional) visa;

you must have held that visa for at least 3 years.

If you hold one of the following visas:

  • Subclass 487 Skilled Regional Sponsored visa;

or the last substantive visa you held since entering Australia was one of the following visas:

you must have substantially complied with the conditions to which that visa was subject.

How To Apply For A Spouse Visa

You need to apply for spouse visa Australia online at  ImmiAccount (unless the Department has authorised lodgement of a paper application, which occurs in limited cases). The visa application requires the applicant to complete Form 47SP, and your spouse must lodge a Form 40SP for the sponsorship application.

You must provide all required supporting documents by attaching them to the online spouse visa application Australia. Immigration will communicate with you in relation to your application through ImmiAccount, and you can also use the online portal to prepare and submit any relevant forms (e.g. to notify a change of circumstances or a new passport).

If an immigration professional prepares the application form for you, they will do so using their organisation’s online account with the Department.

A Final Thought

Some Tips On How To Maximise Your Chances Of Visa Grant Without Further Delays

Partner visas can be complex and require careful consideration of the relevant Australia spouse visa requirements that apply based on the individual circumstances of each case. These applications can be tough to get through and require being fully informed on all requirements as they apply to each application.

To help make this process easier for you and to gain a better understanding of what is involved as part of this process, please refer to our guides on the top reasons for partner visa applications being refused and what case officers look for when deciding partner visa applications. This information will enable you to anticipate any potential issues arising with your own application and to address them up-front at lodgement. This means more chances of the visa being granted and less delay.

Our articles which provide an overview of the partner visa and further detailed information for spouse relationships are also great sources of information to help you through this process.

You can complete our partner visa assessment tool to help to assess whether your relationship is up to immigration standards for a partner visa.

Additionally, you might like to refer to our guides on How to bring your wife to Australia on a genuine partner visa and Can a man get Australian PR if his wife is Australian , which provide further useful information to assist you in preparing and lodging your partner visa application. There you will find some useful information on what the Department considers to be a legally valid marriage in Australia and how to apply for a partner visa, including the costs that you can expect to incur.

And For Some Extra Help

The good news is that you don’t have to do it alone. As you can see from the discussion about, applying for a spouse visa can get pretty complicated in most cases. Why is this so? Because relationships themselves are complex. We are all different and so are our relationships. And so applying a standard set of requirements to all relationships can bring up some tricky issues, especially if the individual arrangements deviate from what is normally considered the usual case (if such a thing even exists!). A registered migration agent can help you to delve through the detail contrained in the migration provisions, to clearly and in simple language explain what are the requirements for a spouse visa in Australia. It is vitial to the overall sucess of your partner visa application that you are fully informed about the Australia spouse visa requirements, and how they apply to your own personal situation.

A migration expert not only has the training, skills, qualifications and experience to competently advise you on this process, but they also have access to a wealth of information sources, to keep on top of developments in migration law as they arise (which occurs often!). Staying up to date and abreast of the latest changes to the migration laws and policy is critical to maximise your chances of a successful outcome on your application. Take the stress out of the process and give yourself peace of mind by leaving it in the hands of a professional to take care of your application for you. And with the coming changes to the partner visa application process discussed above, it is now more important than ever to be on top of the latest developments and what is expected to come in the pipeline. Anticipate and plan for changes before they happen and stay ahead of the pack by seeking expert assistance and advice today.

PAX Migration Australia Is Here To Help

To learn more about how the team of professionals at PAX Migration Australia can assist you, reviews and testimonials from our clients about what they have to say about us, and why obtaining professional advice and assistance from a migration expert can be beneficial in achieving a successful result on your spouse visa application Australia, please see the below articles:

Selecting a migration agent in Australia

Should I use a migration agent or immigration lawyer for my application?

Migration Agent in Adelaide

Immigration Agent Adelaide

Migration Agent Australia

Best Migration Agent Adelaide

PAX Migration Adelaide

To find out if you are eligible to apply for a spouse visa Australia,  contact us  on 08 7226 2225 or  [email protected]  and book a consultation for personal and tailored advice specific to your circumstances.

Get More Information About The Spouse Visa

We have prepared a series of articles to provide further information about the partner visa program and how it operates, including the partner visa application process and eligibility requirements. Please see the links below for more information.

Partner Visa Sponsorship

Partner Visa Sponsor Requirements

Partner Visa Sponsor Approval

How to bring your wife to Australia on a genuine partner visa

Top 5 reasons why partner visas are refused

How to be approved as a partner visa sponsor?

Bridging visas for partner visa applicants

What evidence should I provide?

What case officers look for in a partner visa application?

Overview of Onshore Australian Partner Visa Schedule 3

Why partner visa applications are so tough

Partner Visa Application Process

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Australia’s migration laws are complex, and each case is different. There are also several terms which are defined in the migration provisions (and whose meanings may differ from their ordinary usage). We recommend that you seek professional advice to learn about what are the requirements for a spouse visa in Australia if you are seeking to apply for a partner visa in Australia, as being fully informed will give you the best chance of achieving a successful outcome on your case. A migration professional can help you to do this.

For up to date advice on the partner visa application process and spouse visa requirements, book your confidential consultation with a migration agent in Adelaide. PAX Migration Australia is a leading immigration advice service based in Adelaide.

Sources/Links

Australian Government – Services Australia – Individuals – Medicare

https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/individuals/subjects/payments-visa-holders

Australian Government – Department of Home Affairs – Immigration and citizenship – Settling in Australia – Adult Migrant English Program (AMEP)

https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/settling-in-australia/amep/about-the-program

Australian Government – Department of Home Affairs – Immigration and citizenship – Help and support – Applying online or paper – ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Applying online in ImmiAccount

https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/help-support/applying-online-or-on-paper/online

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Constantine Paxinos

Director posted on: 29-06-2021, book your consultation with us today, get regular updates and information....

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Australia's Partner Visas: A Journey of Love

Welcome to your comprehensive guide on Australia’s Partner Visas, where we bring together hearts from across distances. This guide is for those eager to join their significant others in Australia, whether through marriage, a de facto partnership, or a prospective union. We explore various Partner Visa categories, shedding light on eligibility, application processes, and the benefits these visas offer. Whether you’re planning a wedding in Australia or continuing a committed relationship, this guide will be your beacon, lighting the path to a life shared in Australia.

Partner (Temporary) Visa (Subclass 820) - Apply Onshore

The Partner Visa (Subclass 820) is a crucial step towards permanent residency in Australia for partners and spouses of Australians. It enables a temporary stay in Australia, allowing engagement in work, study, and other activities while awaiting the permanent visa decision. This visa underscores Australia’s commitment to family unity, enabling partners to integrate into the Australian way of life. Benefits like access to English language classes and Medicare reflect a comprehensive approach to supporting immigrants, helping partners adapt to and contribute to their new community.

Who it’s for: De facto partners or spouses of Australian citizens, Australian permanent residents, or eligible New Zealand citizens.

Application Process: You apply for both the Partner (Temporary) Visa (Subclass 820) and Partner (Permanent) Visa (Subclass 801) together while in Australia.

Stay: The stay is temporary until the Partner (Permanent) Visa (Subclass 801) decision is made.

  • From AUD$8,850.00 for most applicants.
  • From AUD$1,475.00 for Prospective Marriage Visa (Subclass 300) holders.

Key Features:

  • Live, work, and study in Australia while your Partner (Permanent) Visa (Subclass 801) is in process.
  • Enjoy unlimited travel to and from Australia.
  • Eligibility for free English language classes and Medicare.

Eligibility Requirements:

  • Must be in a genuine relationship with an Australian citizen, permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen.
  • Must have sponsorship from your partner.
  • Applicants and any family members must be in Australia when applying.

Partner (Permanent) Visa (Subclass 801)

The Partner Visa (Subclass 801) grants permanent residency for partners or spouses of Australian citizens, permanent residents, or eligible New Zealand citizens. It caters to those transitioning from a temporary Partner Visa (subclass 820), affirming the Australian government’s support for long-term, genuine partnerships. It enables permanent settlement and the ability to sponsor family members, reinforcing Australia’s family-oriented immigration policies. The pathway to citizenship provided by this visa is an important step towards full integration into the Australian community for partners of Australians.

Who it’s for: Usually for individuals who currently hold a Partner (Temporary) Visa (Subclass 820).

Application Process: The application for both the Partner (Temporary) Visa (Subclass 820) and Partner (Permanent) Visa (Subclass 801) is combined and submitted while in Australia.

Stay: The stay is permanent.

Cost: Included in the combined application fee for the Partner (Temporary) Visa (Subclass 820) and Partner (Permanent) Visa (Subclass 801).

  • Live, work, and study indefinitely in Australia.
  • Sponsor eligible family members for Australian residency.
  • Eligibility to apply for Australian citizenship.
  • Must hold a Partner (Temporary) Visa (Subclass 820) or Dependent Child (Subclass 445) Visa.
  • Generally, must continue to be in a genuine and ongoing relationship with the sponsoring partner.

Partner (Provisional) Visa (Subclass 309) - Apply Offshore

The Partner (Provisional) Visa (Subclass 309) provides a pathway for partners and spouses of Australian residents to start their journey towards permanent residency. It allows them to live, work, and study in Australia while awaiting the permanent visa decision. Additionally, it offers access to essential services like healthcare and language support, reflecting Australia’s commitment to supporting new residents as they transition to life in Australia.

Application Process: Apply for both the Partner (Provisional) Visa (Subclass 309) and Partner (Migrant) Visa (Subclass 100) together while overseas.

Stay: Temporary, until the Partner (Migrant) Visa (Subclass 100) decision is made.

Cost: From AUD$8,850.00.

  • Live, work, and study in Australia while your Partner (Migrant) Visa (Subclass 100) is being processed.
  • Travel to and from Australia as often as desired.
  • Eligibility for free English language classes through the Adult Migrant English Program and access to Medicare.
  • Require sponsorship from your spouse or de facto partner.
  • Applicants and accompanying family members must be outside Australia when applying.
  • Can be in or outside Australia when the temporary visa decision is made.

Partner (Migrant) Visa (Subclass 100)

The Partner Visa (Subclass 100) facilitates permanent residency for spouses or partners of Australians. It represents a transition from temporary to permanent status, recognising and solidifying the commitment of international couples. It offers lifelong residency in Australia, providing full access to work, study, and social opportunities. Additionally, it extends the privilege of family sponsorship, further uniting families across borders. The pathway to citizenship under this visa underscores Australia’s welcoming approach to immigrants who build their lives and families in the country.

Who it’s for: Primarily for individuals who already hold a temporary Partner (Provisional) Visa (Subclass 309), allowing the de facto partner or spouse of an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen to live in Australia permanently.

Application Process: Apply for both the temporary Partner (Provisional) Visa (Subclass 309) and permanent Partner (Migrant) Visa (Subclass 100) together while overseas.

Stay: Permanent.

Cost: Included in the combined application fee for the temporary Partner (Provisional) Visa (Subclass 309) and permanent Partner (Migrant) Visa (Subclass 100).

  • Live, work, and study in Australia indefinitely.
  • Opportunity to apply for Australian citizenship, if eligible.
  • Must hold a temporary Partner (Provisional) Visa (subclass 309) or Dependent Child Visa (subclass 445).
  • In most cases, should continue to be in a genuine and ongoing relationship with the Australian partner.

Prospective Marriage Visa (Subclass 300)

The Prospective Marriage Visa (Subclass 300) offers a unique opportunity for individuals planning to come to Australia to marry their Australian-based partners. It bridges geographical distances, allowing couples to commence their lives together in Australia. It also accommodates the practical needs of applicants by permitting work and study, thus facilitating a smoother transition to Australian life. Overall, the visa serves as a foundational step for those looking to build their future in Australia, rooted in the commitment of marriage.

Who it’s for: Intended for individuals planning to come to Australia to marry their prospective spouse. It’s a precursor to applying for a Partner visa.

Stay: Between 9 and 15 months from the date of visa grant.

  • Allows the applicant to stay in Australia for 9 to 15 months to marry their prospective spouse.
  • Enables the applicant to work and study in Australia during their stay.
  • Must be 18 years old or older.
  • Need to have an Australian citizen, permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen as a sponsor.
  • Intend to marry the prospective spouse before the visa period ends.
  • Must be outside Australia when applying for this visa and when the visa decision is made, unless specific additional criteria are met for an in-country decision.

Frequently Asked Questions About Partner Visas

What are Australia’s Partner Visas? “Australia’s Partner Visas are designed for individuals who are married, engaged, or in a de facto relationship with an Australian citizen, permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen, providing a pathway to live together in Australia.”

How long does the Partner Visa application process take?   Processing times vary based on the visa subclass and individual circumstances. For an indication of processing times it is recommended to visit The Department of Home Affairs visa processing time guide tool . 

Can I include my children in my Partner Visa application?   Yes, dependent children can be included in your application.

What evidence is required to prove a genuine and ongoing relationship? Evidence can include joint financial records, cohabitation proof, shared responsibilities, and many other sources of evidence. Speak to our Specialist for advice on this critical component of the Partner Visa application.

What happens if my relationship status changes during the application process? Changes in relationship status can affect your application. It’s important to inform the Department of Home Affairs immediately about any changes. Specific outcomes depend on the nature of the change and the visa subclass.

Can I work in Australia while my Partner Visa application is being processed? Yes, applicants who apply for an Onshore Partner Visa (Subclass 820/801) usually receive a Bridging Visa that allows them to work in Australia while their application is being processed.

Embrace Your Future Together in Australia with a Partner Visa

Australia’s Partner Visas represent more than a mere pathway; they are a celebration of your union and a testament to your commitment. Each visa, from the Prospective Marriage Visa to the Partner (Permanent) Visa, serves as a stepping stone toward a shared future. These visas enable you and your loved one to grow together in a land that cherishes diversity and love.

If you’re ready to embark on this life-changing journey, delve deeper into these options. Actively seek advice, understand the nuances, and get ready to embrace a future where your dreams merge with the vibrant culture of Australia. Now is your time to take a bold step forward.

Are you prepared to start this beautiful chapter of your life? Reach out for guidance , and with our Visa Specialist, navigate this journey. Seize the opportunity to build your love story in Australia, a place where endless possibilities await. Take the pivotal step toward a shared and prosperous future in Australia – your new home is calling!

Ask a Specialist

Application review, preparation & lodgement, hour consultation.

  • Immigration Advocacy Australia 2023

Hopetoun Ave, Kilburn

South Australia 5084

partner visa australia travel restrictions

Key Steps to Applying for a Partner Visa in Australia

Partner Visas, often known as de facto visas , are a pathway forward for partners and spouses of Australian Citizens, residents, or eligible New Zealand Citizens residing in Australia.

The process involves two stages. Initially, applicants secure a Provisional Partner Visa, categorized as Subclass 820 for onshore and Subclass 309 for offshore applicants. Upon meeting the requirements for the provisional partner visa, applicants must fulfill a residency period in the country. Subsequently, couples undergo assessment for eligibility for the permanent Partner Visa, which is further divided into two categories: Subclass 801 Visa for Subclass 820 visa holders and Subclass 100 visa for Subclass 309 visa holders. These visas cater to both heterosexual and same-sex couples seamlessly.

Under the Partner Visa Stream, applicants can be sponsored by their Australian spouse, de facto partner, or interdependent partner.

Sponsors must be Australian citizens, Australian permanent residents, or eligible New Zealand citizens aged over 18 years.

If you’re considering marriage, a prospective marriage, or have a de facto relationship in Australia, exploring Partner Visa options could be your next step towards migration. Need assistance navigating the complexities of visa applications? Consider consulting with one of our migration lawyers for expert guidance tailored to your unique situation.

NB Migration Lawyers are here to give you the best chance of a successful Partner Visa application. Click here for your free consult.

Discover the key steps to a successful Partner Visa application in Australia below.

After receiving a temporary Partner Visa, it remains valid until the Australian Immigration Department reaches a decision on your permanent Partner Visa application. Upon approval of the permanent Partner Visa, you can stay in Australia permanently.

How it works

The Partner visa is a crucial pathway for the spouse or de facto partner of an Australian citizen or permanent resident to stay in Australia.

Typically, the applicant is initially granted a temporary visa (for example, 820 for onshore and 309 for offshore applicants), with the opportunity to apply for permanent residency if the relationship remains exclusive, genuine, and ongoing after the two-year waiting period. The 820 and 309 visas do not have an expiry date. It is valid for a ‘stand-down period’ of approximately two years from the original application’s lodgement. It allows you to remain in Australia with full-time work and study rights until you become eligible to apply for the 801 or 100 visa. You will be eligible for permanent residency 2 years after lodging a successful temporary partner visa application. You will be required to provide further evidence to the DHA to establish your eligibility for permanent residency, and you may be onshore or offshore when your permanent visa is granted.

The time it takes the DHA to process your application depends on its processing time service standards and varies according to the complexity of your case, perceived risk factors and processing priorities. The current estimated visa processing timeframes are available on the DHA’s website.

Different Types of Partner Visas

Partner Visas

Australia offers three types of visas designed for sponsoring your partner; these are:

  • Prospective Marriage Visa (Subclass 300);
  • Partner Visa Offshore (Subclass 309/100); and
  • Partner Visa Onshore (Subclass 820/801).

Prospective Marriage

This visa is designed for Australian citizens and permanent residents who plan to sponsor and marry their partner from overseas and settle in Australia. It provides a secure and stable pathway for your partner to enter Australia with full-time work rights. The application will mainly focus on the genuineness of your relationship and intention to marry. After your marriage ceremony, the visa holder may be able to continue their journey towards Australian permanent residency through a Partner visa.

There are two stages :

  • Stage 1: Temporary Partner visa; and
  • Stage 2: Permanent Partner Visa.

Both temporary and permanent partner visas allow you to work, study and stay in Australia, and you may be eligible for Medicare.

Processing Time for Partner Visas in Australia

Although there is no specified duration for processing Partner Visa applications, on average, it takes between 16 to 24 months for completion. However, the processing period for Partner Visa applications varies due to several factors, including:

  • Whether the application includes sufficient information and supporting evidence;
  • Promptness in responding to requests for additional information; and
  • Time required to obtain information from external sources beyond the immigration department’s scope, such as health and biometrics examinations and character checks.

It is advisable to apply for the Partner Visa well in advance of your planned travel or migration date to ensure sufficient processing time.

Additionally, refrain from making travel arrangements, such as ticket bookings or lodging, until you receive a positive outcome for your application.

General Requirements

If your application is based on a marriage:

  • You must be legally married to an Australian citizen, permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen

If your application is based on a de facto relationship:

  • You must have been in a de facto relationship with an Australian citizen, permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen for at least 12 months prior to lodging your application (unless there are compelling or compassionate circumstances)
  • You and your partner must both be at least 18 years old, and must not be closely related

In all cases:

  • You and your spouse/partner must be in a mutually exclusive relationship
  • That relationship must be genuine and continuing
  • You and your spouse/partner must either live together, or live apart on a temporary basis only

Individual Requirements

Prospective marriage visa.

This visa allows you to travel to Australia to marry your intended spouse and then apply for a Partner Visa. For individuals engaged to an Australian citizen, permanent Australian resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen, the Subclass 300 Prospective Marriage Visa, also known as a fiancé visa , is the preferred option. To obtain this visa, the other partner must reside outside of Australia at the time of application.

Partner Visa Offshore

Partner visa offshore (subclasses 309/100).

  • Partner Visa 309
  • Partner Visa 100

You can apply from overseas. This visa permits the partner or spouse of an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen to reside in Australia. You apply for both the Temporary and Permanent Partner Visas concurrently.

Partner Visa Onshore

Partner visa onshore (subclass 820/801).

  • Partner Visa 820 (Temporary Partner Visa)
  • Partner Visa 801 (Permanent Partner Visa)

The most sought-after de facto Partner Visa options are Subclass 820 and Subclass 801, both of which are onshore Partner Visa programs. As for offshore Partner Visas, one can apply to obtain Subclass 309 and Subclass 100. These options are most suitable for individuals in a long-term de facto relationship with an Australian permanent resident or New Zealand citizen.

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Home > Family > Partner Visa > Partner visa document checklist

partner visa document checklist

Australia’s Partner visas are both temporary and permanent visas that enable the spouses (married) or de facto partners of Australian citizens, permanent residents, and eligible New Zealand citizens to reside in Australia on the basis of their relationship. Eligibility for a Partner visa is dependent on several factors, primarily relating to the nature of your relationship.

This document checklist relates to Australia’s Partner visas that can lead to eventual permanent residence (referred to collective as Partner visas below), and not Australia’s new Subclass 870 temporary partner visa, which you can read about here .

Onshore and Offshore visas

There are both onshore and offshore versions of the Partner visa.

The onshore versions of the Partner visa consists of both the:

  • Subclass 820 (temporary) visa; and
  • Subclass 801 (permanent) visa.

On the other hand, the offshore versions of the Partner visa are the:

  • Subclass 309 (temporary) visa; and
  • Subclass 100 (permanent) visa.

As a matter of procedure, both applications are applied for at the same time. Usually, the temporary visa will be granted first, with the applicant being eligible for the corresponding permanent component two years after the lodgement of the initial application. However, where a couple are in a long-term relationship, the two visas can be granted at the same time. A long-term relationship refers to where the couple have:

  • been together for more two years and have a child (not including a step-child); or
  • have been together for more than three years.

Regardless of the Partner visa subclass you are applying for, the documents and information required for your application are largely the same.

Documents Required for a Partner Visa: Evidence of Relationship

There are a range of documents required for a Partner visa, many of which serve as evidence of your relationship. The document types required and some examples of what you might include are outlined in the table below:

  The above is a general checklist, meaning that depending on your circumstances, alternate documents might be more appropriate.

Documents Required for a Partner Visa: Identity and Character

In addition to evidence of your relationship, there are a number of other documents required for both applicant and sponsor. These are outlined below:

Depending on your circumstances, further documents may be required.

Please also note that all documents not in English should be accompanied by a certified English translation.

Including Children

You will be able to include your children in your visa application, who will also be granted a Partner visa. If you are including your children, there are several other documents that will need to be included. For example, you might need:

  • Form 1229 for children under 18 years of age travelling without both parents;
  • Identity and contact details of other parents of the children;
  • Form 48A for children over 18 years of age; and
  • Evidence of financial dependency of any children aged over 18.

Your children will also need identity documents, such as passports and birth certificates.

Post-Lodgement

Processing times for Partner visas vary but are generally quite lengthy. For the latest updates on processing times, you should refer to the Department’s website .

After lodgement, you will need to undertake your health examinations using a HAP ID.

If you apply for the onshore Partner visas, you will normally be granted a Bridging Visa A ( BVA ), providing you unlimited work and study rights. However, if you apply for the offshore Partner visas, you will need to wait for an outcome before travelling to Australia, or alternatively, obtain a different visa.

Key Takeaways

Applying for an Australian Partner visa can be stressful, largely due to the lengthy processing times and high costs involved. However, knowing the range of documents required can help make this process easier. The key documents you will need to provide include evidence of:

  • financial aspects of the relationship;
  • nature of the household;
  • social aspects of the relationship;
  • nature of the commitment to one another;
  • identity; and

If you require assistance with your Partner visa application, or have any other immigration related queries, our experienced team can help. Contact us by email at [email protected] or by phone at +61 3 9016 0484.

This document does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney-client relationship. Please consult an immigration professional for up to date information.

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Emily Young

Author Emily Young

Emily completed her Bachelor of Laws (Honours) from Bond University in 2019, and is busy building her legal knowledge across the entire Australian immigration law framework. She's passionate about global mobility and social issues, having previously worked on matters regarding international parental child abduction, volunteered for Camp Quality, and even set foot in North Korea!

Join the discussion 68 Comments

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Hi Avinash, You can contact us at [email protected] Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi there, we want to lodge our onshore visa soon but don’t know how much space the uploaded docs will need. I am a bit concerned that all the photos, statements and documents will extend the provided space given from the website. Can you please help us with this issue? Kindly Sabine

Hi Sabine, If you are having issues with the file limitation, you probably have too many documents (so should reduce it). You can also email the Department with documents after lodgement, but our recommendation is just too be more specific about the documents (particularly photos). Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi.I am applying for partnership visa so will you tell me what documents will be required.

Hi Deepak, You can see the general documents required in this post (or contact us at [email protected] and we can work with you to get the specific documents for your matter). Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Is it possible to apply while am in Australia With my partner as a residential Australian We luv to work with all yur requirements Nd lodge on Oct or November How much would that be beside the lodge fees??

Hi Jack, Thanks for reaching out. Yes, you can lodge your Partner visa from onshore in Australia (if you have some other visa to travel to Australia in the first instance). You can see a breakdown of fees on our cost calculator here: https://www.hannantew.com.au/cost-calculator/ Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi there! I’m willing to marry my girlfriend here and I’m wondering, her visa expires soon, if we lodge a notice of intent to marry and talk to a marriage celebrant, and we end up getting married can we apply for the partner visa as soon as we get married? I know we need to apply for the official marriage certificate and apparently it can take 6 weeks to get mailed to newlyweds, can we still apply for the partner visa and add it later on when it arrives? Because i don’t want her current visa to expire and it ends up ruining everything I’m just worried, i figured it would be fine but need to make sure. Hope your able to help 🙂

Hi Sam, Yes, you should generally be able to lodge the Partner visa as soon as you are married (assuming you have other evidence of your genuine relationship). You can also potentially apply before your marriage if you can demonstrate a “de facto” relationship. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Where can I get form for statutory declaration attesting to division of household?

Hi Cecilia, A template from the Department is available here: https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/form-listing/forms/stat_dec_sponsor.pdf . Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi, I am Australian citizen since July 2021 and my partner is international student in Australia. As police clearance is required, should both of us getting police clearance from our birth countries as well or only police clearance from Australia?

Hi Daneliya, You’ll both need to pass character, so generally speaking, you’ll both need police clearances from every country (including Australia) that you’ve lived in for 12 months or more in the last 10 years. Good luck! Hannan Tew

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Do you need to do statuatory declarations or is filling out the boxes on the online application enough? They seem to cover the same info.

Hi Dan, A statutory declaration is highly recommended. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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I have problems navigating the dha website on my immi account, in search of the partner 820 visa. If its financially able I’d prefer your expertise to obtain said visa.😀

Hi Maxwell, We’d love to help – feel free to contact us at [email protected] to discuss. You can also see our pricing guide here: https://www.hannantew.com.au/pricing/ Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi, I’m an Australian Citizen and want to apply for a partner visa for a Canadian citizen. I would like to ask if the Canadian citizen needs police clearance from Canada? Also what other documents are needed from Canada? Both of us are divorced and I have 2 children under 18yrs. When we are apply and waiting for approval from immigration, can we go overseas together?

Hi Lina, Your partner will require a police clearance for any country that they have lived in for 12 months or more in the last 10 years. In terms of general documents, the above checklist details what is required. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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I was married my Australian partner since 2016 and now he needs my fully care to him because he was not good condition and his doctor not allowing him to flying back here in Philippines because of his health condition and he was really missing of our son. My question is what could be the first step that I need to do for applying a partner visa or fiancee visa. Because my partner he is a pensioner. Thank you.

Hi Charline, There is no age limitation for a Partner visa, so even though he is a pensioner he can still sponsor you. You need to consider whether an onshore or offshore Partner visa is most appropriate for you. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi If I just got married onshore to my sponsor, do I also need to provide Police clearance? Or my sponsor will be the one to provide it? …. Just worried If I’m onshore I might not be able to get the clearance and need to go back home country just to get it.

Hi Bea, Yes, you will usually need a police clearance from every country that you have lived in for 12 months or more in the last 10 years, whilst your sponsor will need to provide an Australian police clearance. Congratulations with your marriage, and good luck with your application! Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Here is a tricky one that no one seems to have the answer for.

I am currently withdrawing my application for Partner Visa as we have split up – this application was paid for and sent December 2018. However I want to remain in the country, as we have a child, and I also have a new partner. What are my options please?

if you require more information let me know, but I’m worried that I will have to leave and not be able to see my child. Thank you.

Hi Sean, You might have to consider other visa options (including a new Partner visa or a Parent visa). Feel free to contact us at [email protected] to book a consultation. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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HEY My name is merve ,I applied 309 partner visa 10 months ago and my immiacccount status is further statement at the moment,just now ı got a email from immigration they are asking me to provide request for information,there is 2 attachments one is ,s56 and request checklist,under this checklist ,there is checklist items Other requirements-what is that? Relationship history statements-are they same ?

Request Detail Other requirements Please provide evidence of recent communication between you and your partner. Relationship history statements Provide statements from you and your partner about: ● how, when and where you first met ● how your relationship developed ● when you decided to commit to a mutually exclusive relationship to the exclusion of all others ● your domestic arrangements (how you support each other financially, physically and emotionally and when this level of commitment began) ● any periods of separation – when and why the separation occurred, for how long and how you maintained your relationship during the period of separation and ● your future plans. The statements written by you and your partner can be on ordinary writing paper or a statutory declaration form may be used. Can ı answer those questions by writing on a paper?Also do ı need to prove photos and evidence about this questions or giving answers all those questions is enough? regards

Hi Merve, You should have a statement which refers to the evidence to address all Partner visa criteria. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to speak to a lawyer who can assist. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi, I’m currently holding BVE visa which my BVA on appeal. My partner is a Australian Citizen. We decided to get married. Can we get married with my visa status? Appreciate much if you could advice. Thank you.

Hi J, BVE holders might be able to apply for a Partner visa, but you most likely need to address Schedule 3 waiver criteria. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] to see if you meet these requirements. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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hello there i am deepak from india . i am really concern for my partner and she have no family and foster parents did too much inhuman things with her also 3 men did bad with her right now case is going on but culprit are still outside they are trying to threat her too much she is 17 she have no one to help right now she is living with neighbor things are serious i just dont want to text all. i dont have any idea how and which visa i should apply for cuz . i want advice i want to support her pls give me direction how can i ?if i can talk any expert pls help me

Hi Deepak, Sorry to hear about your difficult situation. Given the complexity of the matter, we’ll need to discuss this in more detail. Please email us at [email protected] to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi I am from Pakistan my question is when someone send sponsor for spouse visa tha divorce papr of last marriage require or not because I don’t tell him about my marriage before

Hi Katie, You should disclose your previous relationship and provide divorce papers in your Partner visa application (or else the Department could find that you have provided false or misleading information). Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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my boyfriend wants to sponsor me, he’s been separated for 3 years but he’s not divorced, would there be a problem? he has documents about the separation.

Hi Giselle, It’s complex to not have a formal divorce, but broadly speaking, you can evidence a de facto relationship if the delegate is satisfied that the relationship with the person to whom your boyfriend is married has ended, even if the marriage itself has not. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] to discuss this further. Hannan Tew

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Kindly help Offshore partner visa already in queue from 1 st may 2022..now I’m pregnant with 2 months.if we add my pregnancy in our 309 offshore file. If possible can we get any concession in grant period for visa. Thanks

Hi Bhawna, Firstly, congratulations on your pregnancy! Secondly, there’s no real process to expedite visa processing, but feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss other temporary visa options for your partner in the meantime. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi! How early can I apply for onshore spouse visa? I just arrived last October 5th. Is it better to apply now or on a later date?

Hi Christina, You can apply as soon as you are eligible, and delaying is only important if you don’t have sufficient evidence. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like our assistance. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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I cancelled my sponsorship for my husband,, can he still get a spousal visa without sponsorship? There was no domestic violence or sexual assault during the marriage and no children born in this marriage.

Hi Annette, This depends on which stage of the visa application he was at. If he obtained permanent residence, he is likely to be able to keep it. If not, then the Department will usually write to him to notify him that he no longer meets the requirements for the visa and should depart the country. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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I have a long distance relationship with my partner for past two years and are looking to get married in next year or so. We have never rented a house together etc when he was in Australia and he’s in his home country in Europe. Once we get married, can he apply for an onshore partner visa when he comes over to visit me on a tourist visa?

Hi Bec, Thanks for reaching out. If you are in a married relationship you do not need to evidence a particular duration of living together etc, but you do need to demonstrate a genuine relationship. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] to discuss options in more detail. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi, Im wanting to sponsor my Wife form Canada, Im an Australian resident, can you please tell if what employment details are needed? Letter from employer, payslips or is tax asessment needed?

Hi Jason, You generally don’t need employment details (just evidence of your relationship). Feel free to review the checklist, or contact us at [email protected] to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi, we are in the process of applying for a partner visa and are wondering which documents the sponsor (me) might have to provide as on the application it only says “max. 100 documents” without any information (that I can find) regarding exactly what these might be.

Hi Gabriel, The main document is the statutory declaration from the sponsor and the AFP clearance certificate. In practice, the Department will assess the sponsorship application with the visa application documents. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi, I am applying for 820 partner visa and I couldn’t find the window to upload overseas police clearance certificate and form 80 in the document section at the end of application. So, where can I upload it? Thanks, Purva

Hi Purva, If there’s no clear option, you can always upload documents under the “other “tab. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

Hi Hannan, I couldn’t find anything with other tab as well. Is this option available only after submitting the application? Thanks, Purva

Hi Purva, You can access the “Other Documents” section after lodgement. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Just checking that this has been updated to reflect any recent changes to application. the Stat dec questions are the same as whats in the actual visa application, do we cut and paste the same wording or do we have to re write it?

Hi Rose, We generally refer to the statutory declaration for them ore detailed questions in the Partner visa application itself. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi, we are in the process of applying for a partner visa. Does the police clearance & marriage certificate need to be submitted along with the application or is this something that can be uploaded at a later stage?

Hi Shania, If you are married you should include the marriage certificate with your application. The police clearances can be provided post lodgement, but we strongly recommend all applications be submitted decision ready. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi, my tourist visa got granted and i’m already here in australia, unfortunately my visa conditions states “no further stay”. Can we still apply for partner visa before my tourist visa expires? Thank you

Hi Janelle, There are ways to waive the no further stay condition, but it needs to be done before you submit your Partner visa application. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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We got married 4 months after we first met, and we have been married for 6 months now. However, we have stayed apart for 1.5 months in those 6 months after marriage, due to the 3-month condition on the visitor visa. Is it advisable to wait longer or can we apply for the 820 partner visa?

Hi Urousa, If you are married, you do not need to demonstrate that you have been living together for the entirity of your relationship duration. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss this in more detail. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hello in your explanation for partner visa application. Is this for onshore partner visa application or offshore partner visa application

(Evidence of long-term commitment

Evidence of declaration of relationship to government bodies (such as Centrelink, the Australian Taxation Office )

Regarding this statement in relationship I have children in Australia From my ex girlfriend and never married. We both are doing co-parenting for our. And I am in centre link as a single parent.and getting some payments for My kids. Currently I have married overseas. And thinking about the 309 visa. Do I still have to tell Centrelink about my recent marriage overseas or do I have to wait. Because in Centrelink single parent but for visa application married

Hi John, You dont have to provide centrelink documents to the Department for the partner visa (it is something that can help). If you have sufficient other document, you may choose to omit this. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] to disucss this further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi I’m about to apply for sub class 309 and prepare collecting documents required, thank you to Emily or Hannan Tew for this check list! I’d like to ask what sub or categories for police check certificate and form character assessment when attaching/applying as it seems applicant need to provide those at the same time?

Hi Jalij, We’re not quite clear what you mean by your question – do you want to flick an email to [email protected] to discuss further? Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hello, I have been with my partner for 12 years .. we have many photos of our time together .. but we do not have huge amount of financial connections together if any .. he owns a house out right .. I am on his will as the beneficiary .. we have a bank joint accout .. but only for a year or a bit more. We have family members that can attest for our relationship over the past many years .. but not much evidence you are saying we need .. other than photos and the will .. and the joint bank account .. what are our chances on my partner visa being approved?

Hi Kathy, Even if you don’t have a joint bank account, if you can show finances being transferred to each other then that may satisfy the financial requirements. You can also consider registering your de facto relationship depending on which State you live in. If you’d like to discuss this further, feel free to contact us at [email protected] . Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi Admin I have applied for my wife and the medical and Biometric is done, We are awaiting the RFI and would like to know if it is a good idea to supply it before they ask us to upload forms i1399, 1563, and Police Cert for both of us. I believe this will save time. What do you think kindly advise. Thank you

Hi Nes, Yes, for the fastest processed applications, you should have them decision ready (including your police clearances uploaded). Feel free to contact us at [email protected] for further guidance. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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What Are the Requirements of a Partner Visa?

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By Yin Chiew Practice Leader

Updated on August 2, 2023 Reading time: 5 minutes

This article meets our strict editorial principles. Our lawyers, experienced writers and legally trained editorial team put every effort into ensuring the information published on our website is accurate. We encourage you to seek independent legal advice. Learn more .

The Application Process

What are the key elements of the partner visa application, what kind of evidence do i need to prepare, why might my partner visa application be denied, key takeaways, frequently asked questions.

You may be eligible for a partner visa if you are married to, or in a de facto relationship with, an Australian citizen. Under this visa, you must provide evidence that you are in a genuine and committed relationship with an Australian citizen. Partner visas are suitable for people wanting to remain in Australia with their spouse or partner. However, this application involves expensive government fees and has a refusal rate of nearly 40%. This article will explain how to ensure that your application is correctly prepared to maximise your prospects of success.

The partner visa application process is a combined evaluation of your relationship.

When applying for the partner visa, you apply for both a temporary and permanent partner visa in a combined application. In most cases, the temporary visa is granted first and will allow you to:

  • work in Australia;
  • access healthcare; and
  • travel in and out of the country .

After receiving a temporary partner visa, you will be eligible for the permanent residency visa two years from the date you lodge the combined application. 

In certain situations, the Department of Home Affairs (DOHA) can waive the two-year wait for permanent residency. Accordingly, this means DOHA can grant the temporary and permanent partner visa simultaneously, provided you can establish that you and your partner satisfy the definition of a ‘long-term relationship’. 

To satisfy this definition, at the time of lodging the combined application, you must:

  • be in a relationship for no less than three years; or
  • be in a relationship for no less than two years and have dependent children.

You can apply for the partner visa overseas (subclasses 309 and 100) or within Australia (subclasses 820 and 801). The indicative processing times are anywhere from 9 months to 23 months. If you want to enter Australia sooner and are applying from offshore, you may need to apply for a different visa. If you apply from within Australia and your current visa is due to expire, you will need to apply for a bridging visa. You will usually be issued a bridging visa if you have applied for the partner visa while holding a substantive visa. The bridging visa will allow you to remain in Australia between when your current visa expires and when the partner visa decision is made.

The key criteria to satisfy in a partner visa application is that you must demonstrate that you are in a genuine and committed relationship, to the exclusion of all others, with an: 

  • Australian citizen;
  • Australian Permanent Resident; or 
  • eligible New Zealand Citizen. 

The DOHA will assess your relationship based on the following:

  • whether you share a financial commitment and financial responsibility with your partner;
  • whether you share household responsibilities with your partner;
  • the social aspects of your relationship; and
  • whether you and your partner are committed to sharing your lives together.

It is essential to prepare evidence that addresses each of these four elements.

Your visa application should include detailed statutory declarations from both you and your partner that address the following aspects of your relationship:

  • household; and
  • commitment.

You should support each claim with relevant evidence. Some evidence of a financial commitment might include shared bank statements. For the social element, you should include photographs and evidence of travel plans for the social element. To demonstrate a shared household, show that you have a joint lease and shared household responsibilities. To demonstrate a mutual commitment to each other, you might need to provide evidence of:

  • engagement;
  • children; or
  • plans to have children.

Witnesses to your relationship will also need to prepare statutory declarations supporting your visa. The person making the statutory declaration must sign it in the presence of a justice of the peace (such as your immigration lawyer) or an eligible witness. 

Making sure that all statutory declarations are truthful is essential. Intentionally making a false statement in a statutory declaration can result in four years imprisonment.

Even if you and your partner can demonstrate a genuine ongoing relationship, some factors will make obtaining a partner visa more difficult. You will need to prepare additional evidence for your application if you have;

  • previously not complied with a visa condition either in Australia or internationally;
  • significant health issues; or
  • a criminal conviction.

If any of these adverse factors apply to you, it may be tempting to exclude them from your application to increase your chances of success.

For example, you might have a speeding offence from many years ago that appears insignificant to mention in your application. However, you should always honestly disclose any adverse factors.

It will reflect poorly on your application if you attempt to conceal information and DOHA finds out about it later. Furthermore, if they believe you have supplied misleading information in your visa application, you may be barred from applying for an Australian visa for up to ten years.

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If you and your Australian spouse or partner are applying for a partner visa, your application must include the following:

  • evidence of a financial and social commitment, a shared household, and mutual commitment to a shared monogamous future together;
  • statutory declarations from you, your partner and any witnesses to your relationship; and
  • evidence addressing any character or health issues.

If you have any questions about obtaining a partner visa, our experienced immigration lawyers can assist as part of our LegalVision membership. For a low monthly fee, you will have unlimited access to lawyers to answer your questions and draft and review your documents. Call us today on 1300 544 755 or visit our membership page .

You must supply evidence of your relationship’s social, financial, household and commitment to each other.

This visa is for individuals intending to marry an Australian citizen, permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen. It allows the visa holder entry into Australia for up to 9 to 15 months. During that period, the applicant must finalise their marriage and apply for a Partner (Subclass 820/801) onshore visa.

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Partner visas.

partner visa australia travel restrictions

PARTNER VISAS

  • Prospective Marriage visa (300) – offshore
  • Partner visa 309 (temporary) and 100 (permanent) – offshore
  • Partner visa 820 (temporary) and 801 (permanent) – onshore

Partner visas are for people who are looking to move to Australia and live with their partner or future spouse. All of the above visas require sponsorship by an Australian citizen or permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen

partner visa australia travel restrictions

Types of Visas - Prospective Marriage visa 300

  • Prospective Marriage visa 300 is intended for people who are outside Australia and wish to come to Australia and marry their partner and then apply for a permanent visa.
  • It allows an applicant to stay in Australia from 9 to 15 months from date of grant of visa.
  • The main criteria to be eligible to apply for permanent residency in the future is to marry your prospective spouse before the visa period ends.
  • A holder of this visa can work and study in Australia.

Types of Visas - Partner visas 820/801 and 309/100

  • The main difference in theses visas is where you must be located when applying for a visa: you need to be outside Australia to apply for a Partner visa 309 (temporary) and in Australia to apply for a Partner visa 820 (temporary).
  • After two years of your temporary visa grant you are eligible to apply for a permanent visa (100/801) if the relationship is continuing.
  • Temporary partner visa holders can stay in Australia until their permanent visa is finalised and a permanent visa granted.
  • A holder of any of these types of visas can work and study in Australia, travel to and from Australia, get free English language classes.

Primary Requirements Prospective Marriage Visa 300 applicants

  • Be older than 18 years;
  • Have a sponsor;
  • Meet health and character requirements;
  • Must meet their prospective spouse at least one time in person.

Primary Requirements Partner Visa 309/820 and 100/801 applicants

  • Must be married or in de facto relationship;
  • Must be committed to a shared life to the exclusion of all others;
  • Your relationship must be genuine and continuing.

Primary Requirements for Sponsors

  • Australian citizen or Australian permanent resident or Eligible New Zealand citizen;
  • Must not sponsor any other applicants for partner visas in the last 5 years;
  • Must not sponsor any other applicants for partner visas more then two times in a lifetime.

DHA Application Fee

AUD 7,715  – main applicant

Prospective Marriage visa 300 holders will need to pay additional AUD 1,285 for the main applicant when applying for subsequent visas 820/801

Australian Partner Visa 2021

partner visa australia travel restrictions

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Applying for a Partner Visa in the COVID-19 Era | What you need to know

Applying for a Partner Visa is still possible during the pandemic – here’s a summary of recent concessions affecting Partner and Family Visa applicants –   plus what you should know about applying for a Partner Visa in the COVID-19 Era.

There are two main types of Partner Visas in Australia – 309/100 Partner Visas (must apply offshore) and 820/801 Partner Visas (must apply onshore) – and international travel restrictions have impacted Onshore and Offshore Visa applicants in different ways.

Offshore 309/100 Partner Visa Applicants

Usually, to apply for a Partner Visa offshore you must be   outside Australia at the time the Partner Visa is both lodged and granted (ie, the Offshore Visa Grant Requirement ).

applying for a partner visa

As you can see, Offshore Partner Visa applicants are usually separated from their loved one for a long period before the Temporary Partner Visa is granted.

In the past, many Offshore Partner Visa applicants would have:

  • Applied for other Temporary Visas to see their loved one in Australia while waiting for their Temporary Partner Visa to be granted.
  • Planned to travel out of Australia to meet the ‘ Offshore Visa Grant requirement ‘ – this requires applicants to be overseas at the time of their visa grant.

However, due to the pandemic, many Offshore Partner Visa applicants may currently be in Australia and may not be able to travel out of the country.

Thankfully, from 27 February 2021 a temporary concession commenced, which may allow the below Partner and Child Visa applicants in Australia to have their visa granted without having to leave the country (conditions apply).

  • 309 Partner Visa  and  300 Prospective Marriage Partner Visa
  • 101  Child Visa , 102  Adoption Visa  and 445  Dependent Child Visa  applicants

The temporary concession will mean they may be able to have their visa granted without leaving Australia. Once approved, they will also no longer have to apply for new Temporary Visas to extend their stay, which can be stressful and expensive.

A temporary concession also commenced from 24 March 2021 for the below  Parent Visa applicants in Australia :

  • 173 Contributory Parent Visa ,  143 Contributory Parent Visa and the 103 Parent Visa

In addition, a further temporary concession applies to Subclass 300 Prospective Marriage Visa applicants  whose visa is granted from  27 February 2021 . These visa holders may be eligible for a visa grant period of up to 15 months (increased from 9 months)  at the discretion of the Department.

Onshore 820/801 Partner Visa Applicants

Fortunately, people who apply for a Partner Visa Onshore are usually unaffected by the travel restrictions because their visa requirements do not require travel out of Australia.

They can remain in Australia from the time of applying for the Partner Visa to the time it is granted.

Here’s an example of the Onshore Partner Visa journey.

applying for a partner visa

Partner Visas in the COVID-19 Era

Here’s what you should know about applying for a Partner Visa during the pandemic:

  • The Government processing time is currently 23 to 28 months for an Onshore 820 Partner Visa. The applicant can stay in Australia while it is being decided.
  • The below graph shows the impact of the pandemic on Onshore 820 Partner Visa grants from 1 Jan 2020 to 31 Dec 2020.

applying for a partner visa

For partners overseas – it is also still possible to apply for a Partner Visa.

  • The Government processing time is currently 18 to 22 months for 309 Offshore Partner Visas. Once granted, Subclass 309 Partner Visa holders can come to Australia without requesting for a Travel Exemption.
  • The below graph shows the impact of the pandemic on Offshore 309 Partner Visa grants from 1 Jan 2020 to 31 Dec 2020.

applying for a partner visa

Also, more placements are available for Partner Visas this year  – placements increased to 72,300 people , which is the bulk of the 77,300 placements in the Family Stream.

  • Our migration agents have noticed an increase in Department ‘Requests for Further Information’ for Partner Visa applications. This indicates the Government is committed to filling the placements.
  • The Government have also informed the Migration Institute of Australia that more resources are being dedicated to processing Partner Visas while other visa options may not be possible for travel at this time.

applying for a partner visa

A Temporary Concession has also been implemented to allow sponsors of Offshore 309 Partner Visa applicants to appeal a visa refusal decision – conditions apply.

Interstaff | Migration to Australia in the COVID-19 Era

We hope this was helpful. You can read more about Partner Visas here  and catch up on our Australian immigration insights below:

New Rules for Travel to Australia Critical Work and Compassionate Travel Exemptions | Migration in the COVID-19 Era Sponsoring Highly Skilled Migrants | The Global Talent Program COVID-19 Vaccination and International Travel Australia Travel Declarations | What to Do Before Travelling

If you have any queries about your visa circumstances or options, we encourage you to get in touch with Interstaff’s Registered Migration Agents. Simply contact [email protected]  or  +61 8 9221 3 388 .

Source: Interstaff’s Registered Migration Agents Migration Institute of Australia The Department of Home Affairs

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Partner Visa Applications outside of Australia

Reflects australian immigration law as at 1 september 2018..

Download fact sheet.

Who can apply for this visa?

You may be eligible for this visa if you are the spouse or de-facto partner of an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen. You must be outside Australia to apply for this visa.

The application process involves two stages. The first stage for the grant of a temporary partner visa  (subclass 309)  involves an assessment of your relationship. The temporary partner visa will allow you to travel to, enter and remain in Australia until your permanent partner visa  (subclass 100)  is processed. This second stage assessment usually occurs more than two years after the date of your application. You may be able to obtain the permanent visa without having to wait for the two years to pass if at the time of making the application:

  • you were in the relationship for three years; or
  • you were in the relationship for two years and you also have a dependent child with your partner; or
  • your partner was granted a permanent humanitarian visa at a time when you were in a married or de-facto relationship with each other

If your relationship ends before your visa is granted or if you are experiencing family violence in your relationship you should obtain legal advice as soon as possible (see IARC’s information sheet ‘Breakdown of relationship – Partner visas (subclass 820/801, 309/100 and 100)’ for more information).

Who can be a sponsor for this visa?

You may be eligible to be a sponsor if you are the spouse or de-facto partner of the applicant and you are:

  • an Australian citizen; or
  • living in Australia as the holder of a permanent visa; or
  • an eligible New Zealand citizen. If you are under the age of 18 your parent or guardian may be able to be the sponsor.

Sponsorship limitations

If you have previously sponsored someone or have previously been sponsored yourself as a partner there may be limitations on your ability to be a sponsor. There may also be limitations on your ability to sponsor if you hold a Woman at Risk visa, a Contributory Parent visa or if you have committed certain offences.

These limitations can be waived in certain circumstances. You should obtain legal advice if this applies to you.

Spousal or de-facto relationship

A requirement for being granted this visa is that you are in a spousal or de-facto relationship at the time of your application.

Are you in a spousal relationship?

You will be considered to be in a spousal relationship if you are in a married relationship that is recognised under Australian law – this can include foreign marriages.

You will also need to show that:

  • you have a mutual commitment to a shared life as a married couple to the exclusion of all others; and
  • your relationship is genuine and continuing; and
  • you live together or do not live separately and apart on a permanent basis.

Are you in a de-facto relationship?

You will be considered to be in a de-facto relationship if:

  • you are not in a married relationship with your partner; and
  • you have a mutual commitment to a shared life to the exclusion of all others; and
  • you live together or do not live separately and apart on a permanent basis; and
  • you are not related by family.

You will also need to show that at the date of your visa application:

  • you were in a de-facto relationship for a period of at least 12 months; or
  • your relationship has been registered under a law of a State or Territory (currently available in Victoria, Tasmania, NSW, ACT and QLD); or
  • you were in a de-facto relationship with the holder of a permanent humanitarian visa and your relationship was declared to the Department of Immigration.

The assessment of your relationship

In deciding whether you are in a genuine and continuing spousal or de-facto relationship the Department should consider all aspects of your relationship including the following four factors:

  • any joint ownership of property or assets (such as a house, car, major appliances or shares in a company);
  • any joint liabilities (such as a credit card, copies of leases, mortgages, or debts in both your names);
  • any shared financial resources (such as joint bank accounts showing regular transactions) or shared financial commitments (such as joint utility bills in both your names or separate names but at the same address)
  • any legal obligations in respect of each other (such as a copy of a will or power of attorney); and
  • how you share your day-to-day expenses (this can be through credit card statements or invoices).
  • any joint responsibility for the care and support of children (such as school or child care application forms in both your names);
  • your living arrangements (you can provide letters addresses to either or both of you at the same address or a copy of your lease)
  • how you share the housework responsibilities (in your statements you can explain how you split up the housework responsibilities. For example, who does the cooking, cleaning and gardening? It would be useful to mention the household tasks that you perform together).
  • whether you represent yourselves to other people as being in a spouse or de facto relationship;
  • what your family and friends think about the nature of your relationship (if they are an Australian citizen or permanent resident they can use form 888 – otherwise they can just write a letter explaining how they know you, whether you present yourselves to them as a couple, and why they believe you are in a genuine and continuing relationship);and
  • any social activities that you undertake together (this can include evidence of any holidays, memberships of clubs or a gym, or photographs of you together at social events).
  • the length of your relationship and how long you have lived together;
  • the degree of companionship and emotional support that you offer each other;
  • whether you see the relationship as long term.

It is important that you provide as much evidence about your relationship as you can. The evidence should be detailed and go into the past as far as possible .

Both you and your sponsor should prepare a statement in your own words that covers:

  • when/where/how you met;
  • where and for how long you have lived together;
  • how you share your domestic duties (for example who does the cooking, cleaning, gardening, shopping, child care);
  • how you share your finances and bills (for example, do you have a joint bank account, are gas/electricity/water accounts in both names, do you jointly own a house or car, or are you jointly named on a lease)
  • whether you go out/socialise/entertain people as a couple. Give examples and provide evidence if you can.
  • what are you plans for the future? This can include plans to buy property or a business together, whether you are planning to have/adopt children or buy a pet.
  • whether you give each other emotional support and companionship – you can give examples.

Can I include my children in the application?

You can include your child (or step-child) in the application if they are not married, engaged to be married or in a de-facto relationship and meet one of the following requirements:

  • they have not turned 18;
  • if they have turned 18, they are under the age of 23 and are dependent on you or your spouse/de-facto partner.
  • if your child has turned 23 they are wholly or substantially reliant on you or your spouse/de-facto partner for financial support because they are incapacitated for work due to the total or partial loss of their bodily or mental functions.

Note: a child will be considered to be dependent on a person if:

  • the child is and has been for at least 12 months wholly or substantially reliant on the person for financial support to meet their basic needs for food, clothing and shelter and
  • the child’s reliance on the person is greater than any reliance on any other source of support or person.

Your child will need to continue to meet these requirements at the time a decision is made on your application.

You should seek legal advice if there are children included in the application who have parents or guardians who are not included in the application.

How to make an application

Applications must now be made electronically unless the Department gives you permission in writing to make a paper application. To make an electronic application you will need to:

  • go onto the Department’s website (www.homeaffairs.gov.au/trav/visa/immi) and create an ‘ImmiAccount’.
  • under the ‘My applications’ tab, click ‘new application’ and then click on the ‘family’ tab. You will then need to click on “Stage 1 – Partner or Prospective Marriage visa (300. 309/100, 820/801”.
  • once you answer all the questions you will need to pay the visa application charge – there is an additional charge if you include a child (to find the cost of this visa you can go to www.homeaffairs.gov.au/trav/visa/fees).
  • at least two statutory declarations from friends or relatives explaining how they know the both of you and why they believe that your relationship is genuine and continuing (you can use form 888);
  • certified copies of you birth certificates and passports;
  • certified copies of your sponsor’s birth certificate and evidence that they are an Australian citizenship or permanent resident;
  • certified copy of the birth certificate of a child that is included in your application together with a form 1229 completed any other person who can lawfully determine where the child can live;
  • evidence that your relationship is genuine and continuing (see above).

Before you can be granted a partner visa you will also need to satisfy health and character requirements. This will involve undergoing a medical examination, providing relevant criminal record checks and passing general character requirements. It is possible to provide further evidence in support of you application until a decision is made in your case.

How long will it take?

The Department of Immigration publishes standard processing times of most visas on their website. You can find visa waiting times at  https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/about/accessaccountability/service-standards/global-visa-citizenship-processing-times

What happens if my application is refused?

If your application is refused your sponsor may be able to seek review of that decision at the Administrative Appeals Tribunal. You should seek legal advice as soon as possible as very strict time limits apply.

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  • Immigration

Australia Partner Visa Subclass 801: Eligibility, Requirements & Process

Becoming a permanent resident through the subclass 801 visa means proving the legitimacy and strength of your relationship with your partner, as well as meeting several other criteria. in the pages that follow, you'll find clear, step-by-step instructions on what documents you'll need, how to satisfy the requirements, and tips to ensure a smooth application process..

Australia Partner Visa Subclass 801: Eligibility, Requirements & Process

Key Takeaways:

  • The 801 Visa is a permanent resident visa requiring a prior Temporary 820 Visa application and a two-year wait period.
  • Eligibility requires a continuous relationship, good character, paid debts, and holding a valid 820 Visa.
  • Necessary documents include proof of relationship, joint finances, completed forms, and translated, scanned, and colored documents.

Welcome to your essential guide on the Australia Onshore Permanent Partner Visa, Subclass 801. This permanent resident visa opens a world of opportunities, allowing you to live, work, study, and eventually apply for Australian citizenship. But before you can enjoy these perks, there’s a journey to embark upon, beginning with the temporary 820 Visa. This guide will walk you through everything you need to know, from the waiting period and eligibility requirements to the detailed application process and frequently asked questions.

Becoming a permanent resident through the Subclass 801 Visa means proving the legitimacy and strength of your relationship with your partner, as well as meeting several other criteria. In the pages that follow, you’ll find clear, step-by-step instructions on what documents you’ll need, how to satisfy the requirements, and tips to ensure a smooth application process. Whether you’re just starting the process or are awaiting your permanent residency , this guide is designed to provide you with all the necessary information in a straightforward and easy-to-follow manner.

What is the Australian Partner Visa (Subclass 801)?

The Australian Partner Visa (subclass 801) grants permanent residency, enabling you to work, study, travel, and eventually apply for Australian citizenship.

What is the Process to Obtain the 801 Visa?

The 801 Visa is the final step in becoming a permanent resident. Initially, you must apply for the Temporary 820 Visa.

How Long Does It Take to Get the 801 Visa After the 820 Visa?

Australia Partner Visa Subclass 801: Eligibility, Requirements & Process

Typically, you wait about two years after obtaining the 820 Visa to be eligible for the 801 Visa. However, you may qualify for both visas simultaneously if the following conditions apply:

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  • You and your partner have been together for at least two years (married or cohabitating) and have a child together.
  • You and your partner have been together for at least three years (married or cohabitating) and do not have a child together.

For detailed information on visa eligibility and application processes, visit the official Australian Government Immigration website .

What Are the Eligibility Requirements for the Subclass 801 Visa?

To qualify for the 801 Visa, you need to:

  • Continue your relationship with your partner (sponsor).
  • Meet the permanent residency criteria in Australia, which includes:
  • Being of good character .
  • Ensuring all debts to the Australian government are paid.
  • Holding a valid 820 Visa .

What Documents Are Needed for the Subclass 801 Visa?

You’ll need to submit various documents, including:

  • Passport Copies : Scanned pages showing personal information, picture, and expiry date.
  • Proof of Relationship :
  • Marriage certificate (for married spouses).
  • Evidence of a committed, monogamous relationship and cohabitation (for de facto partners).
  • Financial Joint Proof : Documents demonstrating shared finances like joint mortgages, bank accounts, or utility bills.
  • Shared Domestic Responsibilities : Statements showing shared housework or joint custody of children.
  • Statutory Declarations :
  • Completed “Statutory Declaration – Partner visa (sponsor)” form.
  • Two forms of Form 888 , “Statutory declaration by a supporting witness,” filled out by family, friends, or relatives to confirm awareness of your relationship.
  • Police Certificates : Australian police certificates for you and dependents over 16, if not already submitted for the temporary visa.
  • Additional Documents for Changed Circumstances:
  • Completed Form 1022 – Notification of changes in circumstances.
  • Documents related to the change (e.g., marriage or adoption certificates).
  • Form 929 – Change of address and/or passport details (if applicable).
  • Dependent Children : Passports and documents related to any changes in their situation.
  • Your Spouse’s Documents : Scanned passport showing their signature or their Australian driver license.

How to Ensure Your Documents Are Correctly Submitted?

  • Re-submit Certain Documents : You may need to submit documents again to prove ongoing eligibility if they were part of your 820/801 Visa joint application.
  • Translate Documents : All documents must be translated, and the translator should be accredited by the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI).
  • Certification : Certification of documents is not required for the Subclass 801 Visa.
  • Scanning and Saving : Scan all documents in color and save each document as a single file, even if it includes multiple pages.

For further details on document preparation and submission, you can refer to the Australian Government’s Department of Home Affairs official page.

These steps will help ensure that your Subclass 801 Visa application proceeds smoothly.

How to Apply for the 801 Visa?

When you initially applied for the Temporary 820 Visa, you also applied for the Permanent 801 Visa. To advance, submit additional documents to the Department of Home Affairs for eligibility verification.

Steps to Complete Stage 2: Permanent Partner Visa Assessment (100, 801) :

  • Log in to your ImmiAccount .
  • Initiate the application for “Complete Stage 2 – Permanent Partner Visa Assessment (100, 801).”
  • Submit documents similar to those required for the temporary visa to prove continued eligibility.
  • The earliest you can submit is one month before the two-year anniversary of your initial application.
  • Do not submit earlier unless instructed by an email notification.

Note: If you received both the 820 and 801 Visas simultaneously, there’s no need for additional applications or documents.

What is the Cost of the 801 Visa?

When you first applied two years ago, you paid for the 801 Visa. However, you still need to cover other fees, such as:

  • Police certificate
  • Health check fees
  • Marriage certificate
  • Passport-size photos
  • Mailing or postage fees

These additional costs can amount to several hundred dollars.

Is the 801 Visa Permanent Residency?

Yes, the 801 Visa grants permanent residency in Australia, enabling you to:

  • Live and work in Australia indefinitely.
  • Study and receive government assistance for tertiary education.
  • Register for Medicare , Australia’s public healthcare scheme.
  • Sponsor eligible family members to come to Australia.
  • Travel freely in and out of Australia for the first five years. After that, you must obtain a Resident Return Visa (RRV) or Australian citizenship.
  • Attend English language classes through the Adult Migrant English Program.
  • Become an Australian citizen after a few years.

For more detailed information, visit the official Australia Department of Home Affairs .

Can I Add My Child to the 801 Visa Application?

Yes, you can add a child to your 801 Visa application even if they were not included in the temporary visa application. Here’s how you can do this:

  • Obtain a Dependent Child Visa (Subclass 445): Your child must first get this visa and travel to Australia.
  • Complete Form 1002: Fill out the “Application by a subclass 445 dependent child for a permanent partner visa” form and attach it to your ImmiAccount.

Requirements:

  • Health Check: Your child must meet Australian health requirements.
  • Police Certificate: Children aged 16 or older must obtain a police certificate.

How to Transition from an 801 Visa to Australian Citizenship

You can apply for Australian citizenship four years after receiving your Partner Visa (Subclass 801). The requirements for citizenship include:

  • Citizenship Test: You must pass this test unless you are 60 years or older.
  • Residency: You shouldn’t have lived outside Australia for more than 12 months in the last 4 years. Additionally, in the last 12 months, you must not have been outside Australia for more than 3 months.
  • Living in Australia: You must reside in Australia when applying and intend to continue living there.

Can You Gain Australian Citizenship Through Marriage?

Yes, if you marry an Australian citizen or permanent resident, you can initially apply for a Partner Visa to join them. A few years after becoming a permanent resident, you may apply for citizenship.

Benefits of Citizenship:

  • You don’t need a Resident Return Visa to travel in and out of Australia.
  • You can obtain an Australian passport.
  • You can vote.

For more detailed information, you can use the Citizenship Wizard tool provided by the Department of Home Affairs.

Can the 801 Visa Be Cancelled?

Yes, an 801 Visa can be canceled under certain circumstances:

  • Failure to Meet Requirements: If you no longer meet the visa requirements .
  • Breaking Rules: If you violate any visa regulations.
  • False Information: If you provided false information during your application.

Before cancellation, the Department of Home Affairs will inform you of their decision and you can appeal by providing evidence.

Sponsor’s Role:

  • Your partner can’t cancel your visa after it’s granted but can withdraw their sponsorship during the processing period.
  • To cancel or withdraw an application, your sponsor must submit a written request to the Department of Home Affairs, including their name, birth date, visa transaction reference number (TRN), and a confirmation statement.

Post-Cancellation Options:

  • You must leave Australia immediately or apply for a Bridging Visa.

What Happens if You Break Up on an 801 Partner Visa?

If you break up after receiving the 801 (Permanent) Visa, you can generally still stay in Australia. However, this might lead to questions about the legitimacy of your relationship. If the Department of Home Affairs believes the relationship wasn’t genuine, they might cancel your visa.

Break-up Scenarios Before 801 Visa Approval:

If you break up before becoming a permanent resident, you can remain in Australia only under the following conditions:

  • Domestic Violence: You were a victim of domestic violence.
  • Joint Custody: You and your partner have joint custody of an Australian child.
  • Death of Partner: Your partner has passed away.

By understanding these guidelines, you can navigate the complexities of the 801 Visa and the path to Australian citizenship more effectively.

Certainly! Below is a list of official and helpful external resources relevant to the “Australia Partner Visa 801: Eligibility, Requirements & Process FAQs”:

5 Official and Helpful External Resources for Australian Partner Visa Subclass 801

  • Australian Government Department of Home Affairs – Partner Visa (Subclasses 820 and 801)
  • This is the central resource for information on the Partner (Permanent) Visa (Subclass 801) and its corresponding temporary visa (Subclass 820). It includes eligibility criteria, documentary requirements, application procedures, and processing timeframes.
  • Link : Partner visa (subclasses 820 and 801)
  • ImmiAccount – Online Visa Application Portal
  • This portal is where you submit your visa application and any required documents. It’s crucial for tracking your application status and completing stage 2 of the Permanent Partner Visa Assessment.
  • Link : ImmiAccount
  • Forms 888 – Statutory Declarations by Supporting Witnesses
  • Form 888 is a statutory declaration in which supporting witnesses confirm the authenticity of your relationship. It’s a necessary document for your application.
  • Link : Form 888 – Statutory declaration by a supporting witness relation to a Partner or Prospective Marriage visa application
  • National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI)
  • If your documents require translation, they must be done by NAATI-accredited translators. This site provides information and directories for finding accredited translators.
  • Link : NAATI
  • Australian Citizenship – Department of Home Affairs
  • For those intending to apply for citizenship after obtaining their permanent residency, this resource details the eligibility requirements, citizenship tests, and the application process.
  • Link : Australian Citizenship

These resources provide comprehensive and authoritative information to help navigate the process of obtaining the Australian Partner Visa (Subclass 801) and transitioning to permanent residency and eventual citizenship.

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Four things to know before applying for an Australian Partner Visa

Four things to know before applying for an Australian Partner Visa

8 November 2021

An Australian Partner Visa allows the partner or spouse of an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen to live in Australia.

Despite the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of placements for Partner Visas under Australia’s Migration Program has increased from around 37,000 in 2019/20 to 72,300 people in 2020/21 which bodes well for partner visa applicants as well as their partner-sponsors.

While this article provides a general overview of the partner visa process, it is important to keep in mind that any visa application is an intricate process, highly dependent on your individual situation and the documentary evidence you provide that is assessed against legislative requirements.

This article provides an overview of four things to know before applying for an Australian Partner Visa:

1. Determine your Australian Partner Visa category and subclass – ‘Partner’ or ‘Prospective Marriage’?

Although, there are three major types of Australian partner visas, most applicants will fall under one of these categories, either one of the Partner Visa subclasses; or, if you are engaged to be married, under one of the Prospective Marriage Visa subclasses.

Australian Partner Visa subclasses

The Subclass of Australian Partner Visa you apply for depends on your location at the time of application as Partner Visas can be lodged from inside Australia as well as outside of Australia.

Applying for an Australian Partner Visa when you are onshore (in Australia)

If you are in Australia with your partner, you are eligible to apply for one of these Australian Partner Visa subclasses: Partner Temporary Visa (Subclass 820) ; and eventually the Permanent visa (Subclass 801) . The Subclass 820 visa is a temporary partner visa that allows you to live in Australia and is the first stage towards a permanent Partner Visa (Subclass 801). You apply for both visas at the same time and pay only one application charge. Applications are processed in two stages, about two years apart.

To be eligible for either of these Australian Partner Visas your partner must be an Australian citizen, or an Australian permanent resident or an eligible New Zealand citizen.

If you apply for the Temporary Visa (Subclass 820) and your relationship is assessed as a genuine ongoing relationship and you continue to be sponsored by your partner after two years of the granting of the temporary visa, you can then be granted a Permanent visa.

If one or both of you are outside Australia the relevant Australian Partner Visa subclasses are: Partner Temporary Visa (Subclass 309) and Permanent Visa (Subclass 100) .

Again, you may apply for these visas to enter and stay in Australia if your partner is already an Australian citizen, or an Australian permanent resident; or an eligible New Zealand citizen.

Similar to the onshore Australian Partner Visas discussed above offshore applicant-couples seeking a Permanent Visa (Subclass 100) must demonstrate that theirs is a continuing and genuine relationship that has been continuous for two years following the granting of their Temporary Visa (Subclass 309).

Please note that from 27 February 2021, the Australian Government introduced a temporary concession for the ‘Offshore Visa Grant Requirement’ that usually applies to Subclass 309 Partner Visa applicants who are outside of Australia.

The Offshore Visa Grant requirement usually requires an applicant to be outside of Australia to have their Temporary Partner Visa granted. As it is difficult to depart Australia due to COVID-19 travel restrictions, the temporary concession allows Subclass 309 Partner Visa applicants to remain in Australia without having to fly out of the country to have their Temporary Partner Visa (the Subclass 309 Visa) granted.

Applying for an Australian Prospective Marriage Visa

The prospective marriage visa (subclass 300) is a temporary visa for those who want to enter Australia to join their future spouse before marriage.

To apply for this visa, your fiancé must be an Australian citizen, or an Australian permanent resident, or an eligible New Zealand citizen.

Once married, holders of this visa can then apply for one of the Australian Partner Visas discussed above to remain permanently in Australia.

2. General conditions of eligibility for any Australian Partner Visa

To apply for any of the Australian Partner Visas, you must:

  • be 18 years old;
  • meet the relationship criteria;
  • meet health and character requirements;
  • be sponsored by your partner/fiancé/fiancée; and
  • repay (or have arrangements in place) to repay any outstanding debts owed to the Australian Government.

In addition to meeting these basic eligibility requirements it is important to remember that you will be assessed against relevant subclass legislative requirements depending on which visa subclass you have applied for.

3. Evidence required for Australian Partner Visa applications

Unless there are specific concerns, Immigration offices no longer conduct face-to-face interviews as part of the Partner visa process. Instead the success of your Australian Partner Visa application will depend upon any documentary evidence you submit in support of your application.

Australian Partner Visa applications generally require evidence that confirms dates of important events within your relationship, such as when you:

  • started dating
  • moved in together
  • became engaged

A CMN tip is to create a relationship timeline which will also assist your relationship history statements.

Your relationship history statement is an opportunity to tell the story of your relationship. Make sure you include all key events in your relationship, any other significant moments, how you felt about each other then and now, and your plans for the future.

To support your relationship timeline and relationship history statement collect documents (e.g. bills in joint names, bank statements, plane tickets, holiday bookings) and media (ensure that you have plenty of photos, social media or videos of you as a couple as well as with friends and family). Keep this evidence safe and organised as this will go towards showing the genuineness of your relationship.

The Immigration case officer reviewing your Australian Partner Application may request further documentation or evidence. Such requests can be viewed on your immi.gov account and you will also be notified via email by the case officer. You should respond to any requests for further information should be within 28 days to keep your application progressing .

4. Understanding processing timeframes for Australian Partner Visas

The offshore COVID-19 concession notwithstanding, it is important to note that applying for a Partner Visa from Offshore (a Subclass 309/100 Visa) may involve being separated from your loved one for a long period of time.

The current Government processing time for a Subclass 309 Partner Visa is 18 to 23 months.

Applying for a Partner Visa from Onshore (a Subclass 820 or 801 Visa) also has a long processing time – currently 23 to 28 months.

However, the applicant can stay in Australia with their partner from the time of applying for the Partner Visa to the time it is granted.

Do you need help with an Australian Partner Visa?

Applying for an Australian Partner Visa can be complex and confusing to navigate on your own, and engaging expert immigration lawyers can be key to taking the stress out of the process and ensuring you maximise your chances of a successful visa outcome.

CMN has a team of experienced immigration lawyers who can help you determine which Australian Partner Visa Subclass is right for your situation; guide your application to get it ‘right’ the first time; and then support you through the process.

For help with your Australian Partner Visa application, or any other immigration matter, please contact our team on 1300 123 529, or via email.

The information provided is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all developments in the law and practice. It is not legal advice. Readers should take legal advice as to how the law applies to specific issues or transactions.

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5 things to know about Australian partner visas during the pandemic

Contributor.

Interstaff Legal Services weblink

Applying for a Partner Visa is still possible during the pandemic – here's what you should know about Australian Partner Visas in the COVID-19 Era.

More placements are available for Partner Visas in FY 2020/21

Placements for Partner Visas increased to 72,300 people for Australia's 2020/21 Migration Program, which is the bulk of the 77,300 placements available in the Family Stream. In contrast, in 2019-20, the migration program delivered 37,118 Partner Visa placements and in pre-pandemic 2018-19, there were 38,918 Partner Visa placements delivered. Australia's COVID-19 Pandemic recovery plans aim to facilitate family reunion – particularly for partners, and this is reflected in the migration program planning levels.

1059462a.jpg

The Australian Government is prioritising Partner Visa processing

In February 2021, the Government informed the Migration Institute of Australia that while other visa options may not be possible for travel at this time, more resources at the Department of Home Affairs are being dedicated to processing Partner Visas. Our migration agents have noticed this first-hand in an increase in Department 'Requests for Further Information' for Partner Visa applications. It appears the Government is committed to filling the increase in Partner Visa placements planned for the 2020/21 migration program.

You can apply from either Onshore or Offshore

In Australia,there are two main types of Partner Visas – 309/100 Partner Visas (must apply 'Offshore') and 820/801 Partner Visas (must apply 'Onshore' within Australia).

During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is still possible to apply for a Partner Visa from onshore or offshore, although the Government may prioritise onshore applications. The below graphs show the trend in Partner Visa grants for offshore and onshore applications throughout 2020.

1059462b.jpg

It is important to note that applying for a Partner Visa from Offshore (a Subclass 309/100 Visa) may involve being separated from your loved one for a long period of time. The current Government processing time for a Subclass 309 Partner Visa is 18 to 23 months.

Applying for a Partner Visa from Onshore (a Subclass 820/801 Visa) also has a long processing time – currently 23 to 28 months. However, the applicant can stay in Australia with their partner from the time of applying for the Partner Visa to the time it is granted. Here's an example of the Onshore Partner Visa journey.

1059462d.jpg

Subclass 309 Partner Visa applicants currently in Australia may be able to access a concession

From 27 February 2021, the Government introduced a temporary concession for the 'Offshore Visa Grant Requirement' that usually applies to Subclass 309 Partner Visa applicants.

Applying for a Partner Visa involves two stages – a Temporary Partner Visa and a Permanent Partner Visa. The Offshore Visa Grant requirement usually requires an applicant to be outside of Australia to have their a Temporary Partner Visa granted.

Given that it is difficult to depart Australia due to COVID-19 travel restrictions, the temporary concession allows Subclass 309 Partner Visa applicants to remain in Australia without having to fly out of the country to have their Temporary Partner Visa (the Subclass 309 Visa) granted.

1059462e.jpg

Partner Visa holders are exempt from Australia's current international travel bans - except for Subclass 300 Prospective Marriage Visa holders

With international travel restrictions in place, it can be difficult to know if you can still travel to Australia. Many visa holders are still ineligible for a Travel Exemption to come to Australia at this time.

Subclass 309/100 and Subclass 820/801 Partner Visa holders are automatically exempt from Australia's international travel ban restrictions and can still come to Australia. Unfortunately, Subclass 300 Prospective Marriage Visa holders are not automatically exempt from Australia's international travel ban restrictions and may not be able to enter Australia at this time.

Prospective Marriage Visa holders can request a Travel Exemption for consideration on a case-by-case basis, however an intention to marry may not be considered sufficient to demonstrate that a person is an immediate family member of an Australian citizen or permanent resident.

The Government processing time for Subclass 300 Prospective Marriage Visas is currently at 18 to 29 months. A temporary concession may however apply to Subclass 300 Prospective Marriage Visa applicants whose visa is granted from 27 February 2021. These visa holders may be eligible for a visa grant period of up to 15 months (increased from 9 months) at the discretion of the Department.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

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partner visa australia travel restrictions

Bringing Your Partner to Australia: What You Need to Know about Partner Visas

partner visa australia travel restrictions

Zhanna Heenan

partner visa australia travel restrictions

How long does it take to bring a Partner to Australia?

The processing time to bring your partner to Australia can vary depending on several factors, including the type of visa you are applying for and the specific circumstances of your application.

  • Prospective Marriage Visa (subclass 300) .

The processing time for this visa type can vary but is generally estimated to take around 12 to 18 months from the time of application.

  • Partner Visa (subclass 820/801 or 309/100) .

These visas are for spouses or de facto partners of Australian citizens or permanent residents. The processing time can also vary, but it often takes around 24 to 30 months for the temporary partner visa (subclass 820 or 309) and an additional 24 months for the permanent partner visa (subclass 801 or 100) after the temporary visa is granted.

Important to note that these processing times are approximate and can change over time due to various factors, including changes in immigration policies and the volume of applications being processed. To get the most up-to-date and accurate processing time estimates for your specific situation, it’s essential to check the official website of the Department of Home Affairs in Australia or consult with a registered migration agent. Additionally, immigration processing times can be affected by the completeness and accuracy of your application and supporting documents, so it’s crucial to ensure your application is well-prepared.

How much does it cost to bring a partner to Australia on a partner visa in 2023-2024?

  • Partner Visa (Subclasses 820 and 801).

This visa is for onshore applicants (applicants who are in Australia at the time of application). As of July 2023, the combined application fee for both the temporary Partner visa (subclass 820) and the permanent Partner visa (subclass 801) is AUD 8,850.00

  • Partner Visa (Subclasses 309 and 100).

This visa is for offshore applicants (applicants who are outside Australia at the time of application). As of July 2023, the combined application fee for both the temporary Partner visa (subclass 309) and the permanent Partner visa (subclass 100) is AUD 8,850.00

  • Prospective Marriage Visa (Subclass 300).

This visa is for applicants who intend to marry their Australian partner. As of July 2023, the application fee for the Prospective Marriage Visa (subclass 300) is AUD 8,850.00.

Please note that these fees are subject to change over time, and the Australian government periodically adjusts visa application fees. To obtain the most up-to-date and accurate information on partner visa application fees, it is crucial to refer to the official website of the Department of Home Affairs in Australia or consult with a registered migration agent . Additionally, there may be additional fees or charges associated with secondary applicants, health assessments, police clearances, and other services required as part of the visa application process.

Can I stay in Australia while waiting for a partner visa?

Yes, generally you can stay in Australia while waiting for a Partner Visa (subclass 820/801) to be processed if you applied for this visa while you were in Australia. The Partner Visa (subclass 820/801) is an onshore visa, which means it is designed for individuals who are already in Australia when they apply.

Here is how it typically works:

  • Temporary Partner Visa (subclass 820): Once you apply for the Partner Visa (subclass 820), you are granted a Bridging visa that allows you to remain in Australia while your application is being processed. This temporary visa allows you to live, work, and study in Australia until a decision is made on your permanent partner visa application.
  • Permanent Partner Visa (subclass 801): After a waiting period, usually two years from the date of your initial application, if you continue to meet the eligibility criteria, you may be eligible for the grant of the permanent Partner Visa (subclass 801). This visa allows you to remain in Australia indefinitely.

It’s important to note that while you can stay in Australia during the processing of your Partner Visa application, you must meet all the requirements and obligations associated with the visa category. This includes maintaining a genuine and continuing relationship with your Australian partner and complying with any conditions attached to your substantive visa or Bridging visa. You also need to be aware that not all relationships can be recognised in Australia. Read more here about the types of relationships not recognised under Australian Partner Visa legislation .

Keep in mind that immigration policies and visa processing times can change, so it’s essential to check the official website of the Department of Home Affairs in Australia or consult with a registered migration agent to get the most up-to-date information and guidance on the Partner Visa (subclass 820/801) application process and requirements. The processing times on the Department of Home Affairs website are indicative as there are a lot of factors that can impact the processing of your applications. Submitting a complete and decision-ready application will minimise delays and can reduce processing time.

Can I marry my partner on a Tourist visa in Australia?

Yes, you can marry your partner while they are in Australia on a tourist visa, but there are some important considerations to keep in mind:

  • Tourist Visa Conditions: When your partner enters Australia on a tourist visa (subclass 600) , they do so for tourism and temporary purposes. While on a tourist visa, they cannot engage in work, study for more than three months, or access certain government benefits. Their primary purpose must be tourism and visiting friends or family.
  • Marriage on a Tourist Visa: It is legal to marry in Australia while on a tourist visa. You will need to follow the legal procedures for marriage in the state or territory where you plan to marry. This typically involves lodging a Notice of Intended Marriage (NOIM) with an authorized celebrant at least one month before the wedding. Ensure that you meet all the legal requirements for marriage, including providing the necessary documents.
  • Visa Status After Marriage: Getting married in Australia does not change your partner’s visa status. If you intend for your partner to stay in Australia permanently, you will need to explore options for them to obtain a different type of visa, such as a partner visa (subclass 820/801 or 309/100), which allows spouses or de facto partners of Australian citizens or permanent residents to live in Australia.
  • Migration Implications: Marrying an Australian citizen or permanent resident while on a tourist visa can raise questions about the intent behind the visit. Immigration authorities may scrutinize the situation to ensure that the marriage is genuine and not solely to obtain a visa. It’s essential to be truthful in your application and demonstrate the authenticity of your relationship.
  • Consult with an Immigration Expert: Given the complexities of immigration and visa processes, it’s advisable to consult with a registered migration agent before proceeding with any plans. Heenan & Browne Visa and Migration Services can guide the best visa options for your specific circumstances and help you navigate the legal requirements.

Remember that immigration laws and policies can change over time, so it’s crucial to check the official website of the Department of Home Affairs in Australia or consult with a professional for the most up-to-date information and advice regarding marriage and visa matters.

Can I bring my unmarried partner to Australia?

Australia offers various visa options for partners, including unmarried partners, to join their Australian citizen or permanent resident partners in the country.

One of the common visa options for unmarried partners was the Partner visa (subclass 820/801 or 309/100) or a Prospective Marriage Visa (subclass 300). To be eligible for these visas, you typically needed to demonstrate a genuine and ongoing relationship with your Australian partner, among other requirements .

Can I apply for a Partner visa if I hold a Regional skilled visa or a work visa?

If you have a specific type of regional visa or had one in the past, you need to have held that visa for a certain amount of time before you can apply for a Subclass 820 visa.

For some regional visas, you must have held them for at least two years, and for others, you need to have held them for at least three years.

This rule is in place to make sure that people who were granted regional visas follow the conditions of those visas, which may require them to live, work, and study in a specific regional area. It prevents them from trying to get around these requirements by applying for a Subclass 820 visa.

Can I apply for a Partner visa in Australia if my current visa has expired?

Schedule 3 in the Migration Regulations 1994 outlines the eligibility criteria for people applying for a partner visa in Australia when they don’t currently hold a valid visa (substantive visa). If you’re the holder of a bridging visa, criminal justice visa, or an ‘enforcement visa,’ you’re considered not to have a substantive visa.

If you’re an unlawful non-citizen or a Bridging Visa holder, meaning you’re in Australia without a substantive visa, you’ll also need to meet these criteria.

Schedule 3 allows applicants to apply for a partner visa while they are in Australia, as long as they meet these criteria, instead of having to leave the country and apply from overseas. The main goal of Schedule 3 is to encourage applicants to apply for a substantive visa before their previous visa expires, reducing the number of people on non-substantive visas or unlawfully present in the country. If an applicant meets the Schedule 3 requirements, there is a specific time limit within which they must apply for their partner visa.

What are the requirements of Schedule 3?

There are two key provisions when discussing Schedule 3:

  • The applicant is the holder of a Diplomatic (subclass 995) visa or a special purpose visa and met specific requirements when entering Australia, as outlined in Schedule 3 criteria 3002.
  • The applicant meets Schedule 3 criteria 3001, 3003, and 3004. They may be exempt from these criteria if the Minister is convinced there are compelling reasons not to apply them.

What are criteria 3001, 3002, 3003, and 3004 for Schedule 3?

Criteria 3001 of Schedule 3 states that the applicant must lodge their subsequent visa application within 28 days of their substantive or criminal justice visa expiring or from the date they entered Australia unlawfully.

Criteria 3002 of Schedule 3 requires the applicant to lodge their subsequent visa application within 12 months of their substantive or criminal justice visa ceasing or from the date they entered Australia unlawfully.

Criteria 3003 of Schedule 3 only applies if the applicant entered Australia unlawfully or did not have a valid entry permit or a substantive visa. In this case, additional requirements must be met, including circumstances beyond their control, compelling reasons for granting the substantive visa, eligibility for an entry permit or a visa if applied before becoming unlawful, and agreeing to follow future visa conditions.

Criteria 3004 of Schedule 3 applies if the applicant entered Australia unlawfully and has not been granted a substantive visa since. Requirements include factors beyond their control leading to the lack of a substantive visa, compelling reasons for granting the substantive visa, compliance with previous non-substantive visa conditions, eligibility for a partner visa (subclass 820) at the time of becoming an unlawful non-citizen and agreeing to follow future visa conditions.

Can Schedule 3 requirements be waivered?

If you can’t meet the above-mentioned Schedule 3 criteria, you may still get a waiver (an exception) if you have compelling reasons for not meeting them. However, there aren’t prescribed guidelines for what counts as compelling reasons, and each case is considered individually.

The Department of Home Affairs’ policy states that the waiver is meant for people whose circumstances genuinely make it difficult for them to meet the criteria due to factors beyond their control, like severe illness or incapacity.

Simply having a real relationship with your partner and facing the typical hardships of separation may not be enough for a waiver. The policy also says that if it’s reasonable for you to leave Australia and apply for a visa from outside the country, you might not get a waiver.

Generally, the government isn’t lenient with people who purposely break the rules to get a Partner visa. But if you have genuinely compelling reasons, you can try to make your case by showing how your situation is different from the norm. It’s important to demonstrate that these compelling reasons existed at the time of your visa application, not just later on. Our migration agents are well-equipped and experienced to assist you with preparing a Schedule 3 waiver submission. If you are dealing with . Contact Heenan & Browne Visa and Migration Services today for assistance.

How many times can I sponsor a Partner visa?

You can sponsor up to two people to come to Australia as your spouse, partner, or fiancé.

If you’ve already sponsored someone, you can’t sponsor another person in these categories until at least 5 years have passed since the first sponsorship. If you’ve been sponsored yourself in the past, you also have to wait 5 years before you can sponsor someone in these categories.

There are exceptions to these rules if there are very good reasons (compelling circumstances). The Department of Home Affairs can approve a sponsorship even if it doesn’t meet the usual requirements, however, they will need to consider your particular circumstances and decide whether your application can be granted on compelling or compassionate grounds.

If you have any other questions about Australian partner visa pathways to Australia, book an appointment today . Our registered migration agents are ready to assist.  

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801 visa - Subclass 801 Visa Permanent Partner Visa

801 Visa – Permanent Partner Visa Requirements 2024

Indah Melindasari MARN 0961 448

What is an 801 Visa?

801 visa is the onshore permanent Partner Visa that allows the de facto or spouse of an Australian citizen, permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen to live in Australia indefinitely. This visa is usually for people who currently hold a temporary Partner visa (subclass 820) to apply for the permanent one. And in this post, we will cover all Partner Visa 801 requirements, process, processing time, checklist and other important details.

Are you eligible for the 801 Visa?

To be eligible for the 801 Visa, you must meet the following requirements:

  • You must be at least 18 years of age.
  • You must be married or in a de facto relationship with an Australian citizen, permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen.
  • If you apply based on marriage, you must provide a valid marriage certificate as proof of marriage.
  • If you apply based on the de facto relationship, you must have been living together for at least 12 months with your partner or you have registered your relationship with an Australian authority .
  • Have a sponsor who is usually your partner.
  • You are currently holding a temporary Partner Visa onshore (subclass 820).
  • You have passed the 2 years period since your 820 visa application.
  • You meet the health and character requirements.

Does your sponsor qualify?

You should be sponsored by the same partner who sponsored your 820 Visa. And they must:

  • Be either an Australian citizen or Australian permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen.
  • Did not sponsor any partners for a Partner Visa or Prospective Marriage Visa in the last 5 years.
  • Were not granted a Partner Visa or Prospective Marriage Visa in the last 5 years.
  • Were not convicted for relevant offences or have significant criminal records.

Can Boyfriend or Girlfriend Be Considered as De Facto Partner?

It depends. You can claim your boyfriend or girlfriend as your de facto partner if you have lived with them on the same roof for at least 12 months.

But if you’re dating your Australian boyfriend or girlfriend casually, then you can’t claim them as your de facto partner and you can’t lodge 801 Visa with them.

If there are obstacles to living with your Australian boyfriend or girlfriend, like de facto relationships are not permitted by law in your home country, you might want to register your relationship to the state where your boyfriend or girlfriend resides.

801 Visa Five Steps Application Process

Check your eligibility for the visa.

The first thing you need to do before you apply for a Partner visa subclass 820 and 801 is check your eligibility.

You need to make sure you have met all the criteria and requirements for this Australia spouse visa.

Gather your documents for 801 Visa application

Once you have met all the criteria and requirements, you need to start preparing documents and applying for a Partner visa (subclass 801).

Note that the required documents for marriage based and de facto relationship based Partner Visa (subclass 801) is different.

Submit 801 Visa application

Once you’ve gathered all documents, you can submit your 801 Visa application through the online portal, IMMI Account.

Wait for the decision

The processing time varies, depending on each case.

Your 820 Visa will remain active during the process of your 801 Visa application.

You can work or study in Australia while waiting for the decision. And don’t forget to keep uploading the evidence of your relationship regularly.

801 Visa outcome

The Department of Home Affairs will notify you in writing whether they grant or refuse your 801 Visa application.

If your 801 Visa is granted, you can continue living in Australia indefinitely.

But, if your 801 Visa is refused, you’re most likely required to leave the country.

Is sponsorship application mandatory for 801 Visa?

Sponsorship application is not mandatory for 801 Visa. The Department of Home Affairs will assess the sponsorship application that was previously lodged together with your 820 Visa application.

What happens after you lodge the 801 Visa application?

Your 820 Visa will remain active. So you can live, work and study in Australia with no limitation. You can still travel overseas during the process of your 801 Visa application.

Your 820 Visa will still be valid until you receive the decision for your 801 Visa application.

Partner Visa (subclass 801) second stage checklist

The second stage checklist for Partner Visa (subclass 801) is differ for the applicant, sponsor and to evident the relationship:

  • Identity documents;
  • police clearance from home country;
  • police clearance from other countries where the applicant has lived for 12 months or more;
  • evidence of valid 820 visa;
  • evidence of citizenship status at home country;
  • passport-sized photograph
  • Australian Federal Police Certificate;
  • Police certificate from other countries where the sponsor has lived for 12 months or more;
  • evidence of status as a citizen or permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen;
  • passport-sized photograph.
  • financial aspect – i.e.joint bank account, evidence of income, etc.
  • household aspect – i.e. joint utility bills, joint rent agreement, etc.
  • social aspect – i.e. photos with family or friends, documentation of joint travel, documentation of joint social events, etc.
  • commitment to the relationship – i.e. marriage certificate, evidence of de facto relationship, etc.

Find the complete Second Stage Checklist for Partner Visa 801: Document Checklist For Australian Spouse Visa 2024

How long is the Partner Visa 801 processing time?

The current processing time for Partner Visa 801 is around 9 months to 19 months. The Partner Visa 801 processing time can be longer if you don’t include all the documents needed or you didn’t fill out the application correctly. It’s best to check the Partner Visa 801 processing time regularly through the link below:

https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-processing-times/global-visa-processing-times

So, how long does it take to get 801 visa after 820?

After getting your 820 visa, you will be eligible for your 801 Visa application 2 years after lodging 820 Visa application. After that, you have to wait around 9 to 19 months, according to the current Partner Visa 801 processing time, for your 801 Visa application to be finalised.

Can I get the 820 Visa and 801 Visa at the same time?

It’s possible, but only in certain cases. In general, if you’re in a long and committed relationship, the Department of Home Affairs may grant you the 820 Visa and 801 Visa at the same time.

For example, you have been married to your Australian spouse for more than 3 years, or you have been in a de facto relationship for more than 2 years and have a child with your partner.

801 Visa cost 202 3

There is no cost for the 801 Visa. The cost is combined with the Temporary Partner Visa (subclass 820), which is AUD 8,850 as per July 2023. There is also a charge for each family member who applies for the visa with you.

Please be noted that the visa fee for visa 801 might increase in July every year.

Can I include my family members?

Yes, you can include family members, but only your dependent child, in your 801 Visa application, but there are two possible scenarios here:

  • If this case applies to you, you can simply add your dependent child in your 801 visa application.
  • If this case applies to you, the process will be different. Firstly, you must get your dependent child a Dependent Child (subclass 445) . After that, you can include them to your 801 Visa application.

Be noted that they must be in Australia and meet the health and character requirements.

Is Visa 801 Permanent Residency?

Yes, the 801 visa is a permanent visa, so it grants you the right to stay in Australia indefinitely. You will get full permission to work and study in Australia. And you will have access to Medicare.

Can you apply for Australian Citizenship after getting an 801 Visa?

You may apply for Australian citizenship after getting your 801 Visa if you are eligible for this. Ensure to meet all requirements for Australian citizenship, such as the residency requirements, character requirements, etc.

While preparing yourself for the Australian Citizenship application, you can take the free Australian Citizenship test practice here .

What happens after the 5 years on 801 Visa?

The 5 years validity period on your 801 Visa is for travel facility, which allows you to travel to and from Australia as many times as you want.

Once the 5 year period ends, you must apply for a Resident Return Visa subclass 155/157 (RRV) to allow you enter and exit Australia freely.

Can an 801 Visa get refused?

It’s possible to get your 801 visa application refused if you are unable to demonstrate that you and your partner are still in a genuine and continuing relationship. That’s why it is important during the 2 years period you and your partner gather all the documents required for the 801 visa especially addressing the different aspects of your relationship.

What if your 801 gets refused?

You will have an option to submit a review application to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal . You must pay for another AAT fee, which is AUD 3,374. The process is quite long and complex. The important thing to do is to prove that the decision was incorrectly made, and that your relationship is genuine and continuing.

Can your partner cancel their sponsorship?

If your Partner visa (subclass 801) application is still in process, then your partner still has a right to cancel their sponsorship. But, once your 801 visa is granted, it’s not possible for your partner to cancel the sponsorship.

In some cases, the 801 Visa application must be withdrawn or canceled, but that is not always necessary. Either you or your partner – as the sponsor – can withdraw the application request to cancel the visa by writing a letter to the Department that includes: their full name and date of birth.

What is the difference between Visa 820 and 801?

The Subclass Visa 820 is a temporary or a provisional visa whereas the partner visa 801 is a permanent visa. The temporary Partner visa subclass 820 is granted first and lets you stay in Australia, after 24 months you may be eligible for a Permanent Partner Visa 801.

801 Visa Frequently Asked Questions

ONE derland Consulting managing director and also registered migration agent, Indah Melindasari, B.Com ( MARN 0961 448 ) is here to answer your questions regarding Permanent Partner Visa subclass 801.

  • You will be eligible to apply for a partner visa onshore subclass 820 and 801 if your partner is an Australian citizen, permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen, and your partner should be your sponsor.
  • You are holding a valid visa at the time you apply for this visa.
  • You and your partner are already married or living together at least 12 months, and meet health and character requirements.
  • The requirements for applying the de facto relationship is you must live together with your partner for a minimum of 12 months.
  • If you live with your partner less than 12 months, you can’t apply under the de facto relationship.
  • If the relationship between applicant and sponsor is over, it is the responsibility of both the applicant and sponsor to advise the Department of home affairs immediately.
  • The visa will be cancelled and the applicant will be granted a bridging visa either to make arrangements to depart Australia or arrange to apply for another visa type.
  • You would need to check again the eligibility of the partner visa onshore. If you have met the requirements, you need to finalise all the paperwork showing that your previous relationship has ended. You can’t apply for the partner visa unless you can provide related documents, such as separation documents or a divorced certificate.
  • If you have met the eligibility as mentioned previously and you have compelling reasons, then the answer is yes.
  • If you are onshore, you may look into lodging the partner visa onshore, however, Schedule 3 criteria will apply and you need to get this waived.
  • If you are in a long-term relationship with an Australian citizen, you may be eligible to apply for the onshore partner visa but there may be some regulations and restrictions to look at to double check your eligibility.
  • Unfortunately, no. This 820 visa is designed to apply from inside Australia. Therefore, you would need to be onshore when you apply and when the Department gives you the decision.
  • If you would like to apply for offshore, you may consider to apply the visa subclass 309.

Partner Visa Quick Links

Permanent Partner Visa 801

Temporary Partner Visa 820

Temporary Partner Visa 309

Permanent Partner Visa 100

Australia Spouse Visa Costs

Share This 801 Visa Information, Choose Your Platform!

Ready to start with your australia spouse visa application.

We’ve help couple around the world providing high quality document work for their permanent Australia spouse visa application.

Never put your precious relationship risk. Let ONEderland Consulting, the best Partner Visa 801 expert in Perth handle your case.

Contact us through the form below to take the first step of bringing your partner to Australia.

“Hello everyone, My permanent partner visa (801) granted yesterday.

All i did just followed whatever they asked for and provide them with all the documents like pictures, joint account,payslips etc but no phone calls, no interview.

We were shocked But we feel relieved now. Thanks again to ONEderland immigration and Special thanks to my case manager Sandra Puri and Indah Melindasari we are highly recommend to the people who overstayed or with complex cases.”

Partner Visa Subclass 801

Indah Melindasari, B.Com

Lead Migration Agent – MARN 0961 448

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Partner Visa Australia

Navigating the journey of securing a future with your partner in Australia can be daunting. At Albert Arthur Lawyers, we understand the challenges applicants face when trying to get an approval for their partner visa. We are here to guide you though every step of the application process. The subclass 820/801 partner visa is ideal for applicants who are currently in Australia and wish to be sponsored by their partner who is an Australian citizen, permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen. The partner visa holds the key to making Australia your permanent home together.

Love knows no boundaries, and neither do we.

No matter where you’re from, our team is dedicated to helping you and your partner achieve your dreams of a life together in Australia.

Partner Visa Requirements

Applicants will need to meet the requirements of the partner visa for the application to result successfully. The applicant must demonstrate that they are in a de facto or spousal relationship with an Australian citizen, permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen.

For a de facto relationship, the following requirements must be met:

  • The relationship must be genuine and continuing
  • The relationship must be ongoing for at least 12 months prior to the application unless certain exceptions apply.
  • The couple live together or do not live separately and apart on a permanent basis
  • There is a mutual commitment to a shared life to the exclusion of all others

albert arthur partner visa australia 3 1

How It Works

There are two stages involved in the partner visa application process; the first is the temporary partner visa (subclass 820) , and the second is the permanent partner visa (subclass 801) . In some cases where the relationship has been ongoing for a long time, both visas can be granted at the same time.

albert arthur partner visa australia 4

1. Temporary Partner Visa (subclass 820)

This visa will allow the applicant to stay and remain in Australia until they are granted the permanent partner visa .

If the applicant does not hold any visa or has been refused or cancelled a visa in Australia, they can still apply for the partner visa. However, additional requirements will apply. In certain circumstances, they can also include their child(ren) even though the child(ren) is over 18 years old.

albert arthur partner visa australia 5

2. Permanent Partner Visa (subclass 801)

The permanent partner visa is generally assessed after 2 years from the visa application date unless the applicant and the sponsor are already in a long-term relationship at the time of the visa application.

This stage of the visa application is a permanent visa that allows the holder to remain in Australia indefinitely. In some cases where the relationship has been ongoing for a long time, both visas can be granted at the same time.

Partner Visa Requirements for Sponsors

An Australian citizen, permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen may sponsor an applicant for a partner visa unless they are prevented by the following limitations:

  • If the sponsor is a woman who held a  Woman at Risk visa (subclass 204)
  • The sponsor had previously sponsored their previous partner(s) on a partner visa or  prospective marriage visa
  • The sponsor had a criminal record(s)

If you are affected by any of the limitations above, do not jump to the conclusion that your application will result in failure. We highly recommended that you consult with your immigration lawyer or migration agent to strategise an argument for your case. Our team are experts in navigating through the challenges of a difficult case. If you are faced with ineligibility or rejection, please do not hesitate to contact us.

albert arthur partner visa australia 7

Partner Visa Character Requirements

albert arthur partner visa australia 9

Partner Visa Health Requirements

The applicant must satisfy health requirements. In some cases, there are waivers available for applicants who have health issues.

Relationship Breakdown In Between the Process

albert arthur partner visa australia 10

Let us be your trusted partner on this journey to permanent residency

Partner visa frequently asked questions, what is the processing time for the partner visa.

Currently, the average processing time can be lengthy, even for the first stage (temporary visa). In some cases, it may take up to 2 years. To speed up the process, the partner visa application must be accompanied by complete documents. This is called a decision-ready application. If there is missing evidence or incomplete supporting documents provided, it will cause a delay in the application. For more accurate processing time, you can visit Global Processing Time.

How long do I need to wait before I get my permanent partner visa after the temporary is granted?

The  permanent Partner visa  application can be considered 2 years after the visa application is lodged.

Can I sponsor my new partner if I have sponsored my ex-partner before?

What happens if my partner visa subclass 820/801 is refused, if my relationship breakdown after the visa is lodged, can i get a refund, do i need to be in australia when the partner visa is granted.

Subclass 820 applicant can now be granted the visa while onshore or offshore.

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If you're looking for the best immigration lawyer in Australia, you've come to the right place! No matter what visa type you're seeking to apply, i can assure you that Davin and Calvin will take the best care of you and you'll be amazed by the outcome and how fast things are. Davin is very approachable, very knowledgeable, most reliable and will come up with best solutions to make things work for you. If you're with him, you're in perfectly safe hands. He's highly intelligent, innovative and very patient in taking the extra step to help. I give them 10/10. 🤗🤗🤗 Thanks so much guys!

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I'm delighted to leave a great review for my lawyer who helped me get a protection visa in Australia. They did a fantastic job and were always there to help. If you need legal help, I highly recommend them. Thanks a lot!!

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Davin recently helped me organise my temporary skills shortage visa, he explained the process really well and handled all the complicated details. It was a really easy and efficient service, I'd definitely recommend working with these guys!

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Davin not only resourceful and professional, but also helpful in explaining law things that quite hard to understand for someone like me that not fully understand the Australian laws and regulations. thanks Davin!

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Davin is a very reliable immigration agent and our go-to person whenever we have a difficult visa question or decision to make. He is friendly to talk to, very patient, he pays great attention to details and most importantly he empathizes and genuinely cares about his client - a rare quality that can be quite hard to find these days. He is responsive and accessible whenever we need him the most. We always feel more assured and confident in our visa journey after having a consultation meeting with him. Davin offers a strategic, effective approach and quite often refreshing perspective on how to achieve the outcome we wanted. We highly recommend Davin to anyone who needs help or finds themselves in a sticky difficult visa situation and wishes to get out of it, give him a call and I am sure you will not regret it.

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I received my subclass 186 visa today with the assistance of Albert Arthur Lawyers. Calvin, who guided me through the process, was outstanding in addressing all of my inquiries. If you're someone who pays close attention to minor details in official documentation like myself, I highly recommend collaborating with Calvin. I wish you all luck with your visa process who read this post.

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  • places of worship
  • airports and other transportation hubs and networks
  • public areas such as tourist attractions, restaurants, bars, coffee shops, shopping centres, markets, hotels and other sites frequented by foreigners

Always be aware of your surroundings when in public places.

Australian National Security – Government of Australia

Spiked food and drinks

Never leave food or drinks unattended or in the care of strangers. Be wary of accepting snacks, beverages, gum or cigarettes from new acquaintances, as they may contain drugs that could put you at risk of sexual assault and robbery.

Water activities

Coastal waters can be dangerous. Riptides are common and can be dangerous. Several drownings occur each year.

In certain areas, sharks, crocodiles, jellyfish and other wildlife pose a risk to swimmers.

  • Avoid unsupervised beaches
  • Follow the instructions and warnings of lifeguards
  • Respect the flag warning system, which provides notice of water conditions and safety risks on beaches

Beach safety – Government of Australia

Diving and snorkelling

You must provide a medical declaration for diving or snorkelling.

Follow the instructions and warnings of local authorities.

Safety information for divers and snorkellers – Government of Australia

Trekking and mountaineering

Weather conditions may be dry during the summer. You should be prepared for hot weather.

If you intend on trekking or mountaineering:

  • never do so alone and always hire an experienced guide from a reputable company
  • buy travel insurance that includes helicopter rescue and medical evacuation
  • ensure that your physical condition is good enough to meet the challenges of your activity
  • ensure that you’re properly equipped and well informed about weather and other conditions that may pose a hazard
  • inform a family member or friend of your itinerary, including when you expect to be back to camp
  • obtain detailed information on trekking routes before setting out and do not venture off marked trails or slopes

Remote areas

Some regions in Australia’s interior are very isolated and have small populations. Services are scarce.

You may have difficulty getting adequate mobile phone coverage if you travel there by car.

  • Avoid travelling alone
  • Inform relatives of your itinerary

Road safety

Road conditions and road safety are very good throughout the country. Exercise caution when driving in rural areas at night. Drivers often drive at excessive speeds. Roaming animals and road trains pose further hazards.

Access to some remote locations may be impossible during severe weather conditions. Due to the great distances between settlements and the isolation of many outback areas:

  • avoid travelling in extreme heat conditions
  • plan your overland route carefully
  • provide a friend or relative with your itinerary, and ensure that your vehicle is in good repair
  • carry a first-aid kit and personal medication
  • carry sufficient fuel, water, and food supplies
  • bring a satellite phone or an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB)

We do not make assessments on the compliance of foreign domestic airlines with international safety standards.

Information about foreign domestic airlines

Every country or territory decides who can enter or exit through its borders. The Government of Canada cannot intervene on your behalf if you do not meet your destination’s entry or exit requirements.

We have obtained the information on this page from the Australian authorities. It can, however, change at any time.

Verify this information with the  Foreign Representatives in Canada .

Entry requirements vary depending on the type of passport you use for travel.

Before you travel, check with your transportation company about passport requirements. Its rules on passport validity may be more stringent than the country’s entry rules.

Regular Canadian passport

Your passport must be valid on the day of entry into the country.

Passport for official travel

Different entry rules may apply.

Official travel

Passport with “X” gender identifier

While the Government of Canada issues passports with an “X” gender identifier, it cannot guarantee your entry or transit through other countries. You might face entry restrictions in countries that do not recognize the “X” gender identifier. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Other travel documents

Different entry rules may apply when travelling with a temporary passport or an emergency travel document. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Useful links

  • Foreign Representatives in Canada
  • Canadian passports

Tourist visa: not required for stays up to 90 days Business visa: required Student visa: required

Canadians entering Australia without a visa need to get an electronic travel authority (ETA) to visit Australia. Ensure that you travel with the same passport used to apply for your ETA.

A health examination might be necessary to obtain certain visas.

  • Electronic Travel Authority – Government of Australia
  • Department of Home Affairs – Government of Australia
  • Children and travel

Learn more about travelling with children .

Yellow fever

Learn about potential entry requirements related to yellow fever (vaccines section).

Relevant Travel Health Notices

  • Global Measles Notice - 13 March, 2024
  • COVID-19 and International Travel - 13 March, 2024

This section contains information on possible health risks and restrictions regularly found or ongoing in the destination. Follow this advice to lower your risk of becoming ill while travelling. Not all risks are listed below.

Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic preferably 6 weeks before you travel to get personalized health advice and recommendations.

Routine vaccines

Be sure that your  routine vaccinations , as per your province or territory , are up-to-date before travelling, regardless of your destination.

Some of these vaccinations include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, varicella (chickenpox), influenza and others.

Pre-travel vaccines and medications

You may be at risk for preventable diseases while travelling in this destination. Talk to a travel health professional about which medications or vaccines may be right for you, based on your destination and itinerary. 

Yellow fever   is a disease caused by a flavivirus from the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

  • There is no risk of yellow fever in this country.

Country Entry Requirement*

  • Proof of vaccination is required if you are coming from or have transited through an airport of a country   where yellow fever occurs.

Recommendation

  • Vaccination is not recommended.
  • Discuss travel plans, activities, and destinations with a health care professional.
  • Contact a designated  Yellow Fever Vaccination Centre  well in advance of your trip to arrange for vaccination.

About Yellow Fever

Yellow Fever Vaccination Centres in Canada * It is important to note that  country entry requirements  may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest  diplomatic or consular office  of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.

  Hepatitis B is a risk in every destination. It is a viral liver disease that is easily transmitted from one person to another through exposure to blood and body fluids containing the hepatitis B virus.  Travellers who may be exposed to blood or other bodily fluids (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment, sharing needles, tattooing, acupuncture or occupational exposure) are at higher risk of getting hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for all travellers. Prevent hepatitis B infection by practicing safe sex, only using new and sterile drug equipment, and only getting tattoos and piercings in settings that follow public health regulations and standards.

In this destination, rabies  may be present in some wildlife species, including bats. Rabies is a deadly disease that spreads to humans primarily through bites or scratches from an infected animal. 

If you are bitten or scratched by an animal while travelling, immediately wash the wound with soap and clean water and see a health care professional. 

Before travel, discuss rabies vaccination with a health care professional. It may be recommended for travellers who will be working directly with wildlife. 

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease. It can spread quickly from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

Anyone who is not protected against measles is at risk of being infected with it when travelling internationally.

Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are fully protected against measles.

Japanese encephalitis is a viral infection that can cause swelling of the brain.  It is spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. Risk is very low for most travellers. Travellers at relatively higher risk may want to consider vaccination for JE prior to travelling.

Travellers are at higher risk if they will be:

  • travelling long term (e.g. more than 30 days)
  • making multiple trips to endemic areas
  • staying for extended periods in rural areas
  • visiting an area suffering a JE outbreak
  • engaging in activities involving high contact with mosquitos (e.g., entomologists)

 The best way to protect yourself from seasonal influenza (flu) is to get vaccinated every year. Get the flu shot at least 2 weeks before travelling.  

 The flu occurs worldwide. 

  •  In the Northern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs from November to   April.
  •  In the Southern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs between April and   October.
  •  In the tropics, there is flu activity year round. 

The flu vaccine available in one hemisphere may only offer partial protection against the flu in the other hemisphere.

The flu virus spreads from person to person when they cough or sneeze or by touching objects and surfaces that have been contaminated with the virus. Clean your hands often and wear a mask if you have a fever or respiratory symptoms.

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious viral disease. It can spread from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

It is recommended that all eligible travellers complete a COVID-19 vaccine series along with any additional recommended doses in Canada before travelling. Evidence shows that vaccines are very effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19. While vaccination provides better protection against serious illness, you may still be at risk of infection from the virus that causes COVID-19. Anyone who has not completed a vaccine series is at increased risk of being infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 and is at greater risk for severe disease when travelling internationally.

Before travelling, verify your destination’s COVID-19 vaccination entry/exit requirements. Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are adequately protected against COVID-19.

Safe food and water precautions

Many illnesses can be caused by eating food or drinking beverages contaminated by bacteria, parasites, toxins, or viruses, or by swimming or bathing in contaminated water.

  • Learn more about food and water precautions to take to avoid getting sick by visiting our eat and drink safely abroad page. Remember: Boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!
  • Avoid getting water into your eyes, mouth or nose when swimming or participating in activities in freshwater (streams, canals, lakes), particularly after flooding or heavy rain. Water may look clean but could still be polluted or contaminated.
  • Avoid inhaling or swallowing water while bathing, showering, or swimming in pools or hot tubs. 

Insect bite prevention

Many diseases are spread by the bites of infected insects such as mosquitoes, ticks, fleas or flies. When travelling to areas where infected insects may be present:

  • Use insect repellent (bug spray) on exposed skin
  • Cover up with light-coloured, loose clothes made of tightly woven materials such as nylon or polyester
  • Minimize exposure to insects
  • Use mosquito netting when sleeping outdoors or in buildings that are not fully enclosed

To learn more about how you can reduce your risk of infection and disease caused by bites, both at home and abroad, visit our insect bite prevention page.

Find out what types of insects are present where you’re travelling, when they’re most active, and the symptoms of the diseases they spread.

  • In this country, risk of  dengue  is sporadic. It is a viral disease spread to humans by mosquito bites.
  • Dengue can cause flu-like symptoms. In some cases, it can lead to severe dengue, which can be fatal.
  • The level of risk of dengue changes seasonally, and varies from year to year. The level of risk also varies between regions in a country and can depend on the elevation in the region.
  • Mosquitoes carrying dengue typically bite during the daytime, particularly around sunrise and sunset.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites . There is no vaccine or medication that protects against dengue fever.

Animal precautions

Some infections, such as rabies and influenza, can be shared between humans and animals. Certain types of activities may increase your chance of contact with animals, such as travelling in rural or forested areas, camping, hiking, and visiting wet markets (places where live animals are slaughtered and sold) or caves.

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, livestock (pigs, cows), monkeys, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats, and to avoid eating undercooked wild game.

Closely supervise children, as they are more likely to come in contact with animals.

Person-to-person infections

Stay home if you’re sick and practise proper cough and sneeze etiquette , which includes coughing or sneezing into a tissue or the bend of your arm, not your hand. Reduce your risk of colds, the flu and other illnesses by:

  •   washing your hands often
  • avoiding or limiting the amount of time spent in closed spaces, crowded places, or at large-scale events (concerts, sporting events, rallies)
  • avoiding close physical contact with people who may be showing symptoms of illness 

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) , HIV , and mpox are spread through blood and bodily fluids; use condoms, practise safe sex, and limit your number of sexual partners. Check with your local public health authority pre-travel to determine your eligibility for mpox vaccine.  

Medical services and facilities

Health care is excellent. Service is available throughout the country.

Payment is expected at time of service.

Make sure you get travel insurance that includes coverage for medical evacuation and hospital stays.

Travel health and safety

Keep in Mind...

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety.

Be prepared. Do not expect medical services to be the same as in Canada. Pack a   travel health kit , especially if you will be travelling away from major city centres.

You must abide by local laws.

Learn about what you should do and how we can help if you are arrested or detained abroad .

Canada and Australia are signatories to the Convention on the Transfer of Sentenced Persons. This enables a Canadian imprisoned in Australia to request a transfer to a Canadian prison to complete a sentence. The transfer requires the agreement of both Canadian and Australian authorities. This process can take a long time and there is no guarantee that the transfer will be approved by either or both sides.

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs are severe. Convicted offenders can expect lengthy jail sentences and heavy fines.

Drugs, alcohol and travel

Imports and exports

There are very strict rules and quarantine measures regarding the importation of food and animal products. Information about items which you can and cannot bring to Australia is available from Australia’s Department of Home Affairs.

Immigration and Citizenship – Government of Australia

Traffic drives on the left.

Local authorities accept your overseas driving licence if the names on your licence match exactly those in your passport.

You must apply for a local licence if you intend to stay in Australia longer than 3 months.

Permits are required when travelling on Aboriginal territory.

You should carry an international driving permit.

  • Driving with an overseas licence – Government of Australia
  • More about the International Driving Permit

Dual citizenship

Dual citizenship is legally recognized in Australia.

If you are a Canadian citizen, but also a citizen of Australia, our ability to offer you consular services may be limited while you're there. You may also be subject to different entry/exit requirements .

Travellers with dual citizenship

International Child Abduction

The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction is an international treaty. It can help parents with the return of children who have been removed to or retained in certain countries in violation of custody rights. The convention applies between Canada and Australia.

If your child was wrongfully taken to, or is being held in Australia, and if the applicable conditions are met, you may apply for the return of your child to the Australian court.

If you are in this situation:

  • act as quickly as you can
  • contact the Central Authority for your province or territory of residence for information on starting an application under The Hague Convention
  • consult a lawyer in Canada and in Australia to explore all the legal options for the return of your child
  • report the situation to the nearest Canadian government office abroad or to the Vulnerable Children's Consular Unit at Global Affairs Canada by calling the Emergency Watch and Response Centre

If your child was removed from a country other than Canada, consult a lawyer to determine if The Hague Convention applies.

Be aware that Canadian consular officials cannot interfere in private legal matters or in another country's judicial affairs.

  • List of Canadian Central Authorities for the Hague Convention
  • International Child Abductions: A guide for affected parents
  • The Hague Convention – Hague Conference on Private International Law
  • Canadian embassies and consulates by destination
  • Request emergency assistance

The currency of Australia is the Australian dollar (AUD).

Bush and forest fires

Bush and forest fires are common between October and April, particularly in areas covered by bushes, long grass or coastal scrub. Elevated fire danger ratings and alert levels may be applied to affected areas. The air quality in areas near active fires may deteriorate due to heavy smoke.

In case of a major fire:

  • stay away from the affected area, particularly if you suffer from respiratory ailments
  • be prepared to modify your travel arrangements or even evacuate the area on short notice
  • follow the instructions of local emergency services personnel
  • monitor local media for up-to-date information on the situation

For current information, consult the relevant state or territory authorities.

Fire services

  • Australian Capital Territory
  • New South Wales
  • Northern Territory
  • South Australia
  • Western Australia

Rainy season

The rainy season extends from November to April. Severe flooding occurs annually, especially in the inland parts of the following states: 

Seasonal flooding can hamper overland travel and reduce the provision of essential services. Roads may become impassable and bridges damaged. 

  • Monitor local news and weather reports
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities, including evacuation orders

Australia Rainfall and river conditions – Bureau of meteorology, Australian government

Cyclones usually occur from November to April. They may occur along the coastal areas of Queensland, the Northern Territory and Western Australia.

During this period, even small storms can quickly develop into major cyclones. These severe storms can put you at risk and hamper the provision of essential services.

If you decide to travel to Australia during the cyclone season:

  • know that you expose yourself to serious safety risks
  • be prepared to change your travel plans on short notice, including cutting short or cancelling your trip
  • stay informed of the latest regional weather forecasts
  • carry emergency contact information for your airline or tour operator
  • follow the advice and instructions of local authorities
  • Bureau of Meteorology – Government of Australia
  • Tornadoes, cyclones, hurricanes, typhoons and monsoons
  • Large-scale emergencies abroad

Seismic activity

Australia is located in a seismic zone. Earthquakes may occur.

Local services

Dial 000 for emergency assistance.

Consular assistance

Australian Capital Territory, Victoria, South Australia, Western Australia, Tasmania, Guam, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, New Caledonia, Northern Marianas, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu

New South Wales, Queensland and Northern Territory

For emergency consular assistance, call the High Commission of Canada in Australia, in Canberra, or the Consulate General of Canada in Sydney and follow the instructions. At any time, you may also contact the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa.

The decision to travel is your choice and you are responsible for your personal safety abroad. We take the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provide credible and timely information in our Travel Advice to enable you to make well-informed decisions regarding your travel abroad.

The content on this page is provided for information only. While we make every effort to give you correct information, it is provided on an "as is" basis without warranty of any kind, expressed or implied. The Government of Canada does not assume responsibility and will not be liable for any damages in connection to the information provided.

If you need consular assistance while abroad, we will make every effort to help you. However, there may be constraints that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide services.

Learn more about consular services .

Risk Levels

  take normal security precautions.

Take similar precautions to those you would take in Canada.

  Exercise a high degree of caution

There are certain safety and security concerns or the situation could change quickly. Be very cautious at all times, monitor local media and follow the instructions of local authorities.

IMPORTANT: The two levels below are official Government of Canada Travel Advisories and are issued when the safety and security of Canadians travelling or living in the country or region may be at risk.

  Avoid non-essential travel

Your safety and security could be at risk. You should think about your need to travel to this country, territory or region based on family or business requirements, knowledge of or familiarity with the region, and other factors. If you are already there, think about whether you really need to be there. If you do not need to be there, you should think about leaving.

  Avoid all travel

You should not travel to this country, territory or region. Your personal safety and security are at great risk. If you are already there, you should think about leaving if it is safe to do so.

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Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan

With regards to visa inquiries, you can contact “Foreign Residents Support Center (FRESC) MOFA Visa Information” or “the Japan Visa Information Hotline” listed on the website of the Embassy or Consulate General of Japan. Due to the complex nature of visa requirements, we are UNABLE to respond to visa-related inquiries made through this website at the moment. We advise you to contact the Consular Section of the Embassy or Consulate General of Japan nearest you for more information and advice.

If you are a foreign national, please click the links below for specific information related to respective subjects.

1. Visa Application Procedures

2. about visa.

  • 3. Visa Application Documents

4. Frequently Asked Questions

5. announcements.

  • 6. Inquiries Concerning Visas
  • Be aware of fraudulent website, social media, emails in an attempt to extract payments from visa applicants (July 5, 2017)

Short-Term Stay

(A stay of up to 90 days for tourism, business, visiting friends or relatives, etc. that does not include remunerative activities)

Click on the nationality of the visa applicant traveling to Japan.

China

Visa exemption arrangements have been resumed from 0:00 am (JST) on October 11, 2022.

It is highly recommended to purchase international travel medical insurance for your trip to Japan. Overseas travel medical insurance helps you in case of emergency.

Work or Long-Term Stay

(A stay during which the applicant performs remunerative work in Japan or a stay of over 90 days in Japan, etc.)

  • Procedures chart for long-term stays
  • The Working Holiday Programmes in Japan
  • Japan’s Pre-Entry Tuberculosis Screening

Visa for Medical Stay

Visa exemptions for diplomatic and official passport holders.

  • Points to Note and Application Procedures
  • Visa Processing Time
  • Validity of a Visa
  • Criteria of Visa Issuance
  • Visas and Landing Permission

3. Visa Application Documents (download)

  • (Note1) Refer to [1. Visa Application Procedures] for details of documents required.
  • (Note3) Company/personal seal on Letter of Guarantee and Letter of Invitation is no longer required.
  • Visa application form
  • Tell me why you rejected my visa application.
  • I want to go to Japan. Do I need a visa?
  • I want to invite a foreign national to Japan. What procedures are necessary?
  • What should I do to get a Certificate of Eligibility?
  • The Certificate of Eligibility will not arrive by the time I apply for a visa. Can I still apply for a visa with its copy?
  • As a “guarantor”, to what extent do I need to be responsible?

Newly introduced visas

  • Special highly skilled professional (J-Skip)
  • Designated activities (Future creation individual, Spouse or Child of future creation individual) (J-Find)
  • Designated activities (Digital Nomad, Spouse or Child of Digital Nomad)

Review on restrictions on new entry of foreign nationals into Japan

  • Application for Visa for foreign nationals eligible for Phased Measures toward Resuming Cross-Border Travel
  • Border measures to prevent the spread of novel coronavirus (COVID-19)

Statistics for the Number of Visas

  • Number of Visas Issued in 2021(May 31,2022)

Relaxation of Visa Requirements

  • Visa Waiver Measure for Nationals of the Federative Republic of Brazil in Possession of Ordinary Passports(September 30, 2023)
  • Signing of the Japan-Israel Working Holiday Agreement (April 28, 2023)
  • Visa Waiver Measure for Nationals of the State of Qatar based on Ordinary Passport Registration System (April 2, 2023)
  • Visa Waiver Measure for Nationals of the United Arab Emirates in Possession of Ordinary Passports (November 1, 2022)
  • Japan’s Pre-Entry Tuberculosis Screening (April 3, 2020)
  • Japan's Visa Policy in Accordance with Measures to Combat Trafficking in Persons (February 2009)

6. Inquiries about Visas Application

Foreign Residents Support Center (FRESC) MOFA Visa Information

Yotsuya Tower 13F, 1-6-1 Yotsuya, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-0004 Navi-Dial: 0570-011000 (For some IP phones and calls from overseas, please call +81-3-5369-6577) Monday to Friday, 09:00-17:00

Related Links

  • Websites of Japanese Embassies, Consulates and Permanent Missions

JAPAN eVISA

partner visa australia travel restrictions

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Secure .gov websites use HTTPS A lock ( Lock Locked padlock icon ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Visit the USAGov homepage

International travel documents for children

See what documents a child needs to travel to or from the U.S. alone or with a parent or relative.

Children traveling to the U.S.

All children, including infants, must have their own travel documents such as a passport or document from a Trusted Traveler Program to enter the U.S. If you travel or are going to travel with a child, consider taking the following documents:

  • If the child is traveling with only one of their custodial parents, they must have a letter of consent, preferably in English and notarized, from the other parent or signed by both parents. The letter should say "I acknowledge that my son/daughter is traveling outside the country with [the name of the adult] with my permission."
  • If one parent has sole custody of the child, a copy of the custody document can take the place of the other parent's letter.
  • Parents who frequently cross the border by land with a minor must always carry a letter of permission from the other parent.

U.S. citizen children traveling abroad

Ports of entry in many countries have security measures to prevent international child abduction . If you are traveling alone with your child, you may be required to present documentation proving you are the parent or legal guardian. You may also need a letter of permission from the other parent for your child to travel. 

If your child travels alone, depending on the country, they may be required to present a notarized letter from both parents or their legal guardian. If a minor is traveling abroad and is not accompanied by both parents or a legal guardian, contact the embassy or consulate of the country you will be visiting and ask about entry and exit requirements for that country.

LAST UPDATED: December 6, 2023

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IMAGES

  1. Australia Partner Visa : Types, Requirements, Steps, Eligibility

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  2. Australian Partner Visa Requirements 2023

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  3. What Are the Requirements to Get Australian Partner visa?

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  4. Four Key Aspects Of Partner Visa Australia

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  5. Partner Visa Australia Checklist

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  6. Partner Visa: Important points and Requirements

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VIDEO

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  3. Big news about Australian Tourist Visa 2024 #touristvisa #australia

  4. Partner Visa Australia

  5. Australia Latest Travel updates

  6. Why my Partner Visa got Rejected ? In Australia 2024

COMMENTS

  1. Partner visa (apply in Australia) (subclass 820 and 801)

    The Department of Home Affairs acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and their continuing connection to land, sea and community. We pay our respects to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, their cultures and to their elders past, present and emerging. Information on Partner visa (Temporary) and ...

  2. Partner Visa Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Partner visa (subclass 820) Partner visa (subclass 801) Partner visa (subclass 309) Partner visa (subclass 100) Partner visa (subclass 300) Once you have submitted all the necessary information, you may request priority processing using the Partner Processing Enquiry Form. I am having difficulties with ImmiAccount.

  3. About partner visas

    This visa lets the de facto partner or spouse of an Australia citizen, Australian permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen live in Australia temporarily. You must be in Australia when you apply for this visa. For more information see Partner visa (Temporary) (subclass 820). Getting this visa is the first step towards a permanent ...

  4. Partner visa: Frequently Asked Questions

    A Partner visa (subclass 820/801 and subclass 309/100) is a pathway specifically designed for the partner or spouse of an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen to live in Australia. Whether you are currently in Australia or overseas, planning to apply for a partner visa, or have already started the ...

  5. What Are The Requirements For Spouse Visa In Australia

    A minimum age requirement of 18 generally applies, however this is lowered to age 16 if certain requirements are met. Same-sex marriages are legally recognised in Australia and are therefore also eligible for grant of a partner visa on the basis of marriage (provided all other requirements are satisfied).

  6. PDF The Australian Partner Visa Guide

    Partner visa application fees increased significantly for applications lodged on or after 1 January 2015. The application fee for an onshore partner visa is currently $7,715. This will go up in July 2021. For offshore partner visas and prospective spouse (fiancé) visas, the fees are also $7,715. There used to be a difference between

  7. Australia's Partner Visas: The Comprehensive Guide and Advice

    Cost: From AUD$8,850.00. Key Features: Live, work, and study in Australia while your Partner (Migrant) Visa (Subclass 100) is being processed. Travel to and from Australia as often as desired. Eligibility for free English language classes through the Adult Migrant English Program and access to Medicare.

  8. Partner Visa Guide: Requirements and Eligibility

    This visa allows you to travel to Australia to marry your intended spouse and then apply for a Partner Visa. For individuals engaged to an Australian citizen, permanent Australian resident, or eligible New Zealand citizen, the Subclass 300 Prospective Marriage Visa, also known as a fiancé visa, is the preferred option.To obtain this visa, the other partner must reside outside of Australia at ...

  9. Partner visa document checklist

    social aspects of the relationship; nature of the commitment to one another; identity; and. health. If you require assistance with your Partner visa application, or have any other immigration related queries, our experienced team can help. Contact us by email at [email protected] or by phone at +61 3 9016 0484.

  10. What Are the Requirements of a Partner Visa?

    The partner visa application process is a combined evaluation of your relationship. When applying for the partner visa, you apply for both a temporary and permanent partner visa in a combined application. In most cases, the temporary visa is granted first and will allow you to: work in Australia; access healthcare; and; travel in and out of the ...

  11. Comprehensive Guide to Australian Partner Visas: Types & Requirements

    Prospective Marriage visa (300) - offshore. Partner visa 309 (temporary) and 100 (permanent) - offshore. Partner visa 820 (temporary) and 801 (permanent) - onshore. Partner visas are for people who are looking to move to Australia and live with their partner or future spouse. All of the above visas require sponsorship by an Australian ...

  12. Applying for a Partner Visa in the COVID-19 Era

    There are two main types of Partner Visas in Australia - 309/100 Partner Visas (must apply offshore) and 820/801 Partner Visas (must apply onshore) - and international travel restrictions have impacted Onshore and Offshore Visa applicants in different ways. ... Fortunately, people who apply for a Partner Visa Onshore are usually unaffected ...

  13. Partner Visa Applications outside of Australia

    You must be outside Australia to apply for this visa. The application process involves two stages. The first stage for the grant of a temporary partner visa (subclass 309) involves an assessment of your relationship. The temporary partner visa will allow you to travel to, enter and remain in Australia until your permanent partner visa (subclass ...

  14. Immigration and citizenship Website

    This visa lets the partner or spouse of an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen live in Australia temporarily. Getting this visa is the first step towards a permanent Partner visa (subclass 801) ... Travel and crossing the border; Import, export and buying online;

  15. Australia Partner Visa Subclass 801: Eligibility, Requirements

    Obtain a Dependent Child Visa (Subclass 445): Your child must first get this visa and travel to Australia. Complete Form 1002: Fill out the "Application by a subclass 445 dependent child for a permanent partner visa" form and attach it to your ImmiAccount. Requirements: Health Check: Your child must meet Australian health requirements.

  16. 4 things to know before applying for an Australian Partner Visa

    As it is difficult to depart Australia due to COVID-19 travel restrictions, the temporary concession allows Subclass 309 Partner Visa applicants to remain in Australia without having to fly out of the country to have their Temporary Partner Visa (the Subclass 309 Visa) granted. Applying for an Australian Prospective Marriage Visa

  17. 5 things to know about Australian partner visas during the pandemic

    Subclass 309/100 and Subclass 820/801 Partner Visa holders are automatically exempt from Australia's international travel ban restrictions and can still come to Australia. Unfortunately, Subclass 300 Prospective Marriage Visa holders are not automatically exempt from Australia's international travel ban restrictions and may not be able to enter ...

  18. Partner Visas: How to Bring Your Partner to Australia

    Partner Visa (Subclasses 309 and 100). This visa is for offshore applicants (applicants who are outside Australia at the time of application). As of July 2023, the combined application fee for both the temporary Partner visa (subclass 309) and the permanent Partner visa (subclass 100) is AUD 8,850.00. Prospective Marriage Visa (Subclass 300).

  19. Partner Visa: Important points and Requirements

    Partner visa: Important points & requirements; Partner visa (onshore 820 and 801) Partner visa (offshore 309 & 100) Fiancé (Prospective Spouse subclass 300) Partner visa costs; ... The BVA does not let you travel out of Australia and return. If you want to travel out of Australia and return, apply for a Bridging visa B (BVB).

  20. 801 Visa

    The temporary Partner visa subclass 820 is granted first and lets you stay in Australia, after 24 months you may be eligible for a Permanent Partner Visa 801. 801 Visa Frequently Asked Questions ONE derland Consulting managing director and also registered migration agent, Indah Melindasari, B.Com ( MARN 0961 448 ) is here to answer your ...

  21. Partner Visa Australia

    1. Temporary Partner Visa (subclass 820) This visa will allow the applicant to stay and remain in Australia until they are granted the permanent partner visa. If the applicant does not hold any visa or has been refused or cancelled a visa in Australia, they can still apply for the partner visa. However, additional requirements will apply.

  22. Travel advice and advisories for Australia

    Visas. Tourist visa: not required for stays up to 90 days Business visa: required Student visa: required. Canadians entering Australia without a visa need to get an electronic travel authority (ETA) to visit Australia. Ensure that you travel with the same passport used to apply for your ETA. A health examination might be necessary to obtain ...

  23. Travel documents for non-EU family members

    a valid passport. valid identity card or passport of their EU family member. a document proving family ties with the EU citizen (e.g. marriage certificate, birth certificate etc.) and, if applicable, proof of dependency, durability of partnership etc. proof that they will accompany or join the EU citizen in the EU host country, that is:

  24. VISA

    Inquiries about Visas Application. Foreign Residents Support Center (FRESC) MOFA Visa Information. Yotsuya Tower 13F, 1-6-1 Yotsuya, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-0004 Navi-Dial: 0570-011000. (For some IP phones and calls from overseas, please call +81-3-5369-6577) Monday to Friday, 09:00-17:00.

  25. Partner visa (apply overseas) (subclass 309 and 100)

    The Department of Home Affairs acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and their continuing connection to land, sea and community. We pay our respects to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, their cultures and to their elders past, present and emerging. Information on Partner visa (Temporary ...

  26. How to apply for or renew a U.S. tourist visa

    Visitor (tourist) visas and other travel documents for entering the U.S. The visitor visa is a type of nonimmigrant visa for people who wish to temporarily enter the U.S. There are two categories: B-1 for business travel; B-2 for tourism and medical treatment; Learn about B-1 and B-2 visas, including: Reasons you would need each type of visitor ...

  27. International travel documents for children

    Children traveling to the U.S. All children, including infants, must have their own travel documents such as a passport or document from a Trusted Traveler Program to enter the U.S. If you travel or are going to travel with a child, consider taking the following documents: If the child is traveling with only one of their custodial parents, they ...

  28. Explore visa options

    The Department of Home Affairs acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and their continuing connection to land, sea and community. We pay our respects to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, their cultures and to their elders past, present and emerging.