25+ Teacher Memes For Exhausted Educators Ready For Field Trip Season

Congratulations, teachers! You've finally reached the end of the school year , and all of the chaos, madness and confusion that comes with it. Sure, the unique madness of state exams are mostly over and done with, but you still have final exams creeping around the corner. If you're a K-8 teacher, you probably have no shortage of field days and field trips that require you to corral your class outside of the classroom. I don't envy you on that front, but I'm glad you'll hopefully have some parent volunteers who can make the task of walking around a museum with a bunch of under 10s more manageable. 

Whether the 2023-2024 school year was impossibly difficult, uniquely fulfilling, or staunchly average, you probably need a little break from it. That's why I've gathered 27 hilarious teacher memes that will scratch that relatable part of your brain and hopefully make you laugh a little. 

Reb Beatty is at Anne Arundel Community College. Yesterday at 4:24 PM. Arnold. First test day of the semester and as always, I allow a 3x5 notecard. Today, a student shows up with this. Sure enough, it is 3x5... feet. As precise as I am, apparently I never specified inches and therefore yes, it was allowed. Well played and lesson learned for me. @elijahbowen_ #aacc #audacious #professorlife #accounting #winner ENTRA

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gr Y TEACHER: THIS IS NOT A PARTNER ACTIVITY STUDENTS: OK TEACHER: REMEMBER, YOU MUST WORK INDIVIDUALLY *STUDENTS 2 MINUTES LATER: @teachergoals

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25+ Teacher Memes For Exhausted Educators Ready For Field Trip Season

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This was actually a True Story, I just wanted to eat alot of Pizza during the Field Trip Lunch white touring a High School.

This was actually a True Story, I just wanted to eat alot of Pizza during the Field Trip Lunch white touring a High School. | When i am in a Field Trip and I saw people getting ready for lunch and I see a lot of Pizza Boxes: | image tagged in give me the plant,field trip,memes,funny,relatable memes,pizza | made w/ Imgflip meme maker

Epic Handshake

Epic Handshake | Best things about middle school; Field trips; Pizza Fridays | image tagged in memes,epic handshake,field trip,friday,pizza,school memes | made w/ Imgflip meme maker

this is relatable

this is relatable | Kids on their way to be excited for the field trip to the museum: | image tagged in relatable,school,field trip | made w/ Imgflip meme maker

Please let this be a normal field trip!

Please let this be a normal field trip! | image tagged in gifs,school bus,field trip,ice,slide,hill | made w/ Imgflip video-to-gif maker

Magic School Bus Meme

field trip meme teacher

bye arnold!

bye arnold! | image tagged in gifs,arnold,ms frizzle,magic school bus,cola,field trip | made w/ Imgflip video-to-gif maker

This actually happened in my school

This actually happened in my school | Your school is going on a field trip; To a Hospital | image tagged in hooray not hooray,memes,school,oh no,cringe,field trip | made w/ Imgflip meme maker

Me and the bois on a field trip

Me and the bois on a field trip | ME AND THE BOIS ON A FIELD TRIP | image tagged in gifs,mokey,mickey mouse,me and the boys,school,field trip | made w/ Imgflip video-to-gif maker

This is a great day!

This is a great day! | The class when the teacher forgets about the quiz and decides to go on a field trip: | image tagged in gifs,memes,funny,fun,field trip,teacher forgot | made w/ Imgflip video-to-gif maker

Field trip to the caribbean

field trip meme teacher

Kinda True | SCHOOL TAKING THE CLASS TO A ZOO: ALRIGHT CLASS, WE'RE HERE, NOW DON'T TOUCH THE ELECTRIC FENCE! THAT ONE KID: | image tagged in gifs,school,terminator,field trip,exploding | made w/ Imgflip video-to-gif maker

Pig Sty | I TOLD THAT TEACHER, THE KIDS COULD LEARN A LOT FROM STICKING THEIR HANDS IN PIGSH!T; OMG! ARE YOU SERIOUS? AND THEY'RE DOING IT? HA HA HA!!! YOU CRAZY,  MAN! | image tagged in funny memes,pigs,school,field trip,kids | made w/ Imgflip meme maker

Im on the way Send in the entire squad! Henry stickmin.

field trip meme teacher

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Video captures chaotic moment when Trump reportedly shot on stage at rally

Former President Donald Trump was speaking at a rally being broadcast from Butler County , Pennsylvania, Saturday when he was rushed off stage by U.S. Secret Service after a multiple shots were fired - one of which grazed the candidate's ear.

Video captured the moment the chaotic scene erupted.

Live updates on Trump rally: Donald Trump rushed from stage at rally after apparent gunshots; 1 person and shooter dead

At least six bangs that sound like gunfire are heard while the Republican candidate is on stage - some as he stands behind a podium and after he appears to crouch down behind the podium after the first bang.

Video showed Trump being removed from the site by Secret Service, with his fist raised, after the shots.

It also showed some members of the crowd scatter after initial shots were fired. Others are seen in the video crouching down in stands, some filming the melee with cell phones.

The gunman was killed by Secret Service agents, officials said. One spectator was killed and two others were "critically injured," the Secret Service said.

The ex-president released a statement not long after the shooting:

"I was shot with a bullet that pierced the upper part of my right ear," Trump wrote. "I knew immediately that something was wrong in that i heard a whizzing sound and immediately felt the bullet ripping through the skin."

Where was Trump rally? Butler County, PA appearance was site of shooting Saturday

Where was the Trump rally?

The rally took place in Butler, a rural community at the  Butler Farm Show , a fairground in Butler County.

As of the last census the city's population was just over 13,000 and, according to the  United States Census Bureau , is 2.7 square miles.

'The former President is safe'

United States Secret Service Chief of Communications  Anthony Guglielmi released the following statement  shortly after the incident took place.

"An incident occurred the evening of July 13 at a Trump rally in Pennsylvania. The Secret Service has implemented protective measure and the former President is safe. This is now an active Secret Service investigation and further information will be released."

In a statement issued later, Gugliemi reported the suspected shooter  fired multiple shots  toward the stage at approximately 6:15 p.m. He said the shooter was in an elevated position outside the rally.

Steven Cheung, spokesperson for Trumo, confirmed in a statement that the former president was "fine" but being treated at an area medical facility.

Natalie Neysa Alund is a senior reporter for USA TODAY. Reach her at [email protected] and follow her on X @nataliealund.

A fatal field trip: Texas bus crash shattered victims' lives, revealed regulatory lapses

Editor’s note: This narrative reconstruction of a March 22 school bus crash in Bastrop County is based on more than two dozen interviews with survivors, parents, first responders and trucking industry experts along with reviews of multiple criminal court documents, lawsuits and regulatory records in the case.

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Jessica Flores awoke her young son about 7 a.m. March 22. By then, she had made breakfast and driven her husband, Christopher Reza, to work in time for his 6 a.m. start as a stonecutter. She also had prepared her son’s lunch: a ham sandwich, cookies, water, juice, diced apples and a mandarin.

Jessica dressed 5-year-old Mauro as he drifted in and out of sleep. She chose a white long-sleeved shirt, a Batman shirt and a black sweater. She formed a part and combed his hair to the right.

It was the first day Mauro was to be farther away than school. She felt a strong desire to keep him home. She called her husband. 

“Oye, ¿y si no lo llevo?” she asked. Hey, what if I don’t take him? 

“No, llévalo. Porque se va a divertir con los niños. Es una experiencia para él,” he said. No, take him. Because he’s going to have fun with the kids. It’ll be an experience for him.

Jessica hung up and went to her son’s bed. 

“¿Quieres ir al zoológico?” she asked Mauro. Do you want to go to the zoo? She waited for him to say no. After all, her son was quiet and reserved.

Mauro nodded. 

She resigned herself. She packed his bag, put him in the family's Mitsubishi Outlander and took him to school. 

An hour later, Mauro climbed aboard a yellow school bus for a much-anticipated trip to the Capital of Texas Zoo, about 26 miles east of his elementary school. So too did Caleb Jimenez Martinez, a playful and sassy boy with tightly cut hair, and Mauro’s classmate, 5-year-old Ulises Rodriguez Montoya, who smiled underneath an oversized black baseball cap. They joined 41 other 4- and 5-year-old prekindergarten children and 12 adults, including the driver, as they rumbled down Texas 21, a highway dotted with seasonal bluebonnets springing to full bloom along a rural landscape.

Over two hours, students watched performances with otters and parrots, petted goats and other livestock, and heard the zookeepers list facts about the animals lounging in the shade. Then, they embarked on their return home.

But Hays school district Bus No. 1106 never made it back. Instead, it became the center of the deadliest school bus crash in Texas in nearly a decade. What happened on Texas 21 revealed a cycle of misconduct that enabled a history of substance abuse and a regulatory system that was unable to take a dangerous driver off the road.

By the evening, the bodies of a child on the trip and an adult traveling behind the group were covered in tarps on the side of the scenic highway. Dozens of other children and chaperones were rushed by ground and air to the hospital with broken bones, severe cuts and bruises — left with a lasting nightmare that replays in their minds.

Teacher Ana Laura Zapien Flores got to Tom Green Elementary School at 8 a.m. 

The 560-student campus is nestled among subdivisions off Interstate 35 in Buda, 15 miles south of Austin. Almost 77% of the students are Hispanic, and 35% are English learners. 

Of the 44 students on the field trip, half were from the school’s English language learner program. 

Ana Laura, a 39-year-old mother of three, was excited. Her youngest daughter, Ivana Rodriguez, a pre-K student, would be taking her first field trip, first zoo trip and first school bus ride. 

In the classroom, she and the other teachers labeled Ziploc bags with the pre-K students’ names for lunches and placed sweaters on the children’s desks. It was a crisp morning.

Ana Laura and her colleagues also laid out the children’s lime green or purple tie-dye field trip T-shirts with “Tom Green” written in cursive. An hour later, after students had trickled in, Ana Laura and the other teachers lined the students up to board the bus. 

She smiled as she watched the children excitedly climb the four big steps onto Bus No. 1106 and take their seats. As she got on the bus, she realized it had no seat belts. 

On the night of March 21, while the Tom Green students were getting put to bed, 42-year-old Jerry Hernandez puffed marijuana and fell asleep. He woke up three hours later, at 12:30 a.m., and did cocaine, he later told police.

With little sleep, he went to work an early morning shift for FJM Concrete Pumping, a small Bastrop County firm owned by Francisco Martinez that specialized in pouring concrete at construction sites. Hernandez had worked at FJM just over four months, as one of four drivers. On the job, he would unfurl a boom arm and use the truck’s machinery to pour the concrete mix throughout the site, manning the truck’s controls as fellow workers smoothed the concrete into wooden frames.

Hernandez had worked as a pump truck operator since he was a teen. He had grown up in the Rio Grande Valley city of Weslaco, later moving to Elgin, with a father who worked in construction. In high school, Hernandez had worked in construction, too, but had eventually wanted something different. He began to operate pump trucks.

Along the way, he married. He and his current wife are separated. In January, police arrested Hernandez on a family violence charge in Hays County for an August incident in which he allegedly tried to strangle a family member, according to an arrest affidavit. 

Hernandez has had multiple vehicle-related infractions over 24 years. He paid fines on 10 different traffic violations from 2000 to 2012, including two $115 fines in 2006 for two charges from 2000 for an unrestrained child and for a seat belt violation, according to Bastrop County court records. 

Most recently, Hernandez lived in rural Bastrop County off a highway, on a tree-shaded plot with three vinyl-sided homes. It was an intergenerational residence for the Hernandez family. 

Over two decades, Hernandez worked for multiple concrete pumping companies in Central Texas.

But Hernandez struggled to maintain the clean slate demanded of the industry. In 2020, Hernandez failed a required test for controlled substances by refusing to take it, federal records show. He sought treatment. He tested positive for marijuana in December 2022 and sought treatment again. In April 2023, he tested positive for cocaine, but he never completed treatment, the records show. 

Bus No. 1106 rumbled into the zoo’s parking lot around 11 a.m.

Zookeeper Michael Hicks greeted the group and gave out maps of the zoo campus. 

He led the group up a hill, where the children gathered around a small stage and saw Kumo, the trained Asian small-clawed otter, perform tricks. The otter collapsed to the sound of “bang” as the children giggled.

The students stared at lions and bears, and they fed the Barbados sheep. They lined up to hold a boa constrictor on their shoulders. Caleb enjoyed holding the snake so much that his mother, Laura Martinez, bought him a green plushie at the end of the day. He, and later Ulises, grinned for photos as a zookeeper wrapped the snake around their shoulders.  

Many of the children’s excited parents came along. Ana Laura’s daughter was thrilled to see a porcupine after reading a book in class. 

The lone hiccup was when the zoo’s train stopped running after only one group of students had taken their turn.

At home, Jessica checked a WhatsApp chat as she cleaned around the house to see if Mauro was enjoying the zoo. She asked the mothers in the chat to send a photo. 

Within minutes, a mother replied with two images. One showed Mauro by himself, now wearing the field trip tie-dye shirt. Another showed him with his classmates.

She laughed and was relieved. The morning’s nervousness left her.

By 1:15 p.m., the children had eaten lunch, and it was time to leave the zoo. Some wanted to ride home with their mothers, but the school had a policy that students leave from a field trip the same way they arrived.

On the trip back, most of the children were sleepy. The sun shone bright on Texas 21, and thin, white clouds hung on the sharp blue sky.

Ana Laura sat with Ivana and Mauro toward the middle of the bus on the passenger side. Ana Laura reminded the children to watch that their heads didn’t hit the bus windows. The bus bounced and bumped along.

Ana Laura texted pictures to her husband, Gerardo Rodriguez, of Ivana feeding animals at the zoo.

About 30 miles away, Hernandez woke up from a 15-minute nap in the cab of his truck, shortly after finishing his workday. He started the 2000 Mack concrete truck and headed east to return it to FJM’s lot. 

Bus No. 1106 was less than 11 miles from the zoo, about halfway to Tom Green Elementary School, when it crossed the highway's intersection with Calder Road heading west just before 2 p.m. 

Hernandez should have never been on the road.

A federal system is in place to prevent substance users from driving multi-ton commercial vehicles like concrete pump trucks.

In 2020, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration created the Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse, a centralized nationwide database for commercial drivers. It replaced a looser and more cumbersome system requiring carriers to call drivers’ past employers for their testing records.

If drivers fail a drug or alcohol test, they must receive addiction treatment and pass another substance test before driving again. An employer must check an employee’s clearinghouse record when they hire them and again annually. But Martinez, owner of FJM, didn’t check on Hernandez when he hired him in November, documents show.

In fact, Martinez neglected to complete the annual drug test on any of his drivers in 2023, though he had in at least some prior years, according to records.

In late March, Martinez also paid a $316 fine from a 2021 Texas Department of Public Safety citation for employing an unlicensed driver. 

Even though Hernandez drove 11 months with a “prohibited” license, law enforcement never caught him, perhaps because of the limited points of contact between drivers and officers, but also because of holes in the enforcement process. 

As of now, most officers do not have access to the Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse from their patrol cars. If one had searched Hernandez’s name in the license databases they can access, his “prohibited” status would not have appeared. The DPS has begun to update its motor vehicle system to include the clearinghouse's information. Federal law mandates that it fully do so by Nov. 18.

A federal law published in 2021 seeks to tighten controls by requiring state agencies like the DPS to sync their systems with clearinghouse data and to automatically suspend the commercial licenses of drivers with “prohibited” status. 

Had an officer or inspector noticed Hernandez’s license was “prohibited,” federal law would have required they place him out of service, which means removing him from behind the wheel. 

In Texas, commercial vehicle inspectors are some of the few officials with quick access to the Clearinghouse. They are supposed to check truck drivers’ licenses through inspections at weigh stations or on-road inspections conducted during a patrol. However, the only two weigh stations in Central Texas are north of San Marcos on Interstate 35 and east of Seguin on Interstate 10. That means many drivers operating locally might never encounter an inspector.

Carriers who employ “prohibited” drivers are subject to fines or suspensions if they were caught via an audit, though the DPS focuses its audits on companies that have been involved in crashes, have low safety ratings or receive referrals from officers.

Jason Feltoon, an Austin attorney representing Ana Laura, said the current regulatory system relies on individual company compliance. Federal enforcement happens largely after a violation occurs.

The burden lies with operators like Martinez, though more monitoring could improve safety, Feltoon said. 

“Once you get these trucks up to speed, they're extraordinarily dangerous,” Feltoon said. “Should there be more government oversight? Absolutely.” 

On Texas 21, just before 2 p.m., Hernandez’s eastbound concrete pump truck began to veer into the lane of opposing traffic. The route had one westbound and two eastbound lanes and no divider between the two. 

The school bus driver tried to evade Hernandez by jerking right into the road’s narrow shoulder. 

It didn’t stop the crash. About three-quarters of the pump truck was already in the opposite lane. The truck rammed into the left side of the school bus’s cab and pushed its back end off the road. The bus flipped on its right side and skidded through the dirt and grass before rolling over and crashing to a stop on its wheels. Its back half sat on the grassy shoulder, leaning to the driver’s side.

Behind the bus, the pump truck barreled toward another car, which avoided it, and then collided with a gray Hyundai Tucson. It crushed that vehicle into the guardrail, killing its lone passenger, University of Texas graduate student Ryan Wallace, 33. 

Inside the bus, Ana Laura felt nothing. She saw nothing except glass flying and children tossed. Sheets of paper flew out of the bus.

It wasn’t until the bus rolled to a stop that she began to look around.

Children screamed. A big cut ran down the side of Ivana’s face. Other children had cuts on their faces as well. 

Ana Laura tried to tell the terrified children everything would be all right. 

“Mama’s going to be here soon,” she said. 

The window glass was cracked and bent on some panes, gone in others. The frames of many windows bowed outward. The bus’s front hood had popped open.

One of the teachers was lying in the middle of the bus aisle. Another knelt beside her and screamed, “Please don’t go. Stay with us.”

The teacher didn’t respond. Ana Laura later learned that, though the teacher was seriously injured, she survived.

In a white Toyota RAV4 driving behind the bus, 40-year-old Jason Mertz, a father of four children 1 to 16 years old, swerved to avoid the pump truck. 

He’d been heading home from another day of installing medical equipment for a client in Bastrop, when the hulking truck roared toward him, rocking off balance from wheel to wheel. 

Mertz came to a stop. He heard a crash behind him. He looked over his shoulder and saw the concrete truck plow through the guardrail. 

Moments later, he joined other drivers and neighbors along the busy highway in becoming first responders. Mertz saw the front right corner of Bus No. 1106 was crunched inward above the stairs. At the back, someone stood inside the bus, picking children up and passing them down to another person. 

As Mertz held the children in his arms as if they were his own, they cried. People were gathering the children on the south side of the bus where other adults tried to comfort them.

One of the children Mertz held was different — too still. He brought the child to the other side of the bus, away from the other students, and laid him on the tailgate of someone’s pickup, where an emergency responder — the first Mertz had seen — began to attend to him. Mertz did the only thing he could to provide the boy comfort: He used an extra work shirt from his car to create a pillow. 

Mertz later learned the child’s name was Ulises. He was the only bus passenger killed. 

Mertz watched as medics from three counties converged by ground and air in ambulances and choppers.

One of them was Jason Pack, a battalion chief from Travis County Emergency Services District No. 11.

He and his crew responded to the call to help in the neighboring county because of the number of victims.

Pack had only been at the scene for moments when he got a briefing from an incident commander who relayed the number of those seriously injured and those less hurt who still needed treatment. 

Pack also learned that a boy on the bus and another driver were dead.

Through his 22 years in the profession, Pack, 49, has learned to push those realities out of his mind to focus on helping those he could.

Pack, the father of a 16-, a 10- and an 8-year-old, began tending to the young patients and loading them into ambulances. 

He found a girl who had lost her shoes, and though she was not seriously hurt, he felt she still needed to go to a hospital. She told him she didn’t want to walk barefoot on the pavement.

“Climb aboard, here we go,” he told her. He lifted her off the ground toward an awaiting ambulance.

Caleb’s mother, Laura, had been chatting at a Bastrop friend’s house since leaving the zoo, when her neighbor called with news of the crash. She thought of Caleb, her youngest son.

She tried to calm herself. The large bus couldn't be too damaged. She got in her car. 

Google Maps showed a crash widget on Texas 21 surrounded by red, signifying the traffic buildup. Her phone refreshed and the red inched toward her like the mercury of a thermometer. Her ETA increased. 

The traffic rolled to a complete stop. No cars came from the other direction. She realized she would have to run. 

She parked her car on the shoulder and got out. After a few strides, her Crocs slipped off. She grabbed them and continued in her socks. The rocks dug into her heels, and she felt her legs grow heavy. She prayed to God for wings. 

At the scene, she didn't see a bus. A blue-and-yellow fire truck, ambulances and a few police cars were there. A police officer kept her at a distance. A woman who said she was the bus driver’s daughter introduced herself. She told Laura a boy had died. 

Laura began to scream for her son. She dropped to her knees. 

About five to 10 minutes later, the ambulances and fire truck moved, and Laura saw the disfigured bus and car. Above her, helicopters sputtered. 

She called her husband and told him that a boy had died. He couldn’t speak and felt his heart lunge. 

The Bastrop County crash is the deadliest involving a school bus in Texas since 2015, when a car in Houston smashed into a school bus and knocked it off an overpass bridge, killing two teens. 

Companies construct school buses to be far safer than a regular car and, statistically, the buses are. 

Texas Department of Transportation data show that in 2022, 12 people died every day on state roads. Since 2009, only 12 crashes involving a school bus have killed someone inside the bus, Texas Education Agency data show.

Of 244,092 Texans injured in traffic crashes in 2022, 1.8%, 4,481 were killed. By comparison, only 13 Texans have died on board a school bus during a crash since 2009, less than 0.2% of the 6,829 people injured.  

Parents of children in the March 22 crash were shocked to learn the bus didn’t have seat belts. 

Since the passage of a 2017 Texas law, any newly purchased bus must have seat belts. However, the law includes key exceptions for buses purchased before 2017 or for newly purchased buses constructed before 2017. Districts also can plead financial strain to avoid the requirement. 

Even before the March 22 crash, the Hays school district planned to replace all its regular route buses that lacked seat belts. The day of the crash, Bus No. 1106 was one of just 15 of the district’s 72 daily-use buses without seat belts. All 15 were slated for replacement with newer versions within weeks. 

Emergency responders had already gotten Ana Laura and Ivana into an ambulance before her husband, Gerardo, picked up the phone.

Ana Laura cried on the other end. She had been in an accident, she said, and then hung up the phone to focus on her daughter.

An emergency responder was talking to her. “Make sure she doesn’t fall asleep,” they told her. “Keep her awake.”

Ana Laura leaned next to Ivana, who was falling asleep. The medical personnel took Ana Laura’s phone and called Gerardo back. The EMS responder told him there had been an accident. They were taking his wife and daughter to Dell Children’s Medical Center. 

In the background, he heard Ana Laura crying, “Stay awake. Stay awake. Stay awake.”

Gerardo got in his car and drove. 

Patrol cars surrounded Tom Green Elementary when Eduardo Jimenez, Caleb’s father, arrived. As other parents raced into the school, Eduardo asked an office attendant for a list of the students involved in the crash. Caleb’s name was on the second page. It was the only name written in all capital letters.  

Eduardo called his niece who worked at the hospital. 

“Tío, hay dos caídos,” she told him. “Y uno de esos es un niño.” Uncle, there are two deceased. And one of those is a boy. 

She didn’t know the name. 

His heart sank.

By about 4:30 p.m. at the school gym, law enforcement officials began to tell parents where their children were. Many parents were waiting, calling family members or praying. Mauro's parents, Christopher and Jessica, had waited for about two hours. The officer who talked to the Spanish-speaking couple spoke in English. They best understood three words: 

“Dell medical hospital.” 

At the hospital, the couple found Mauro in a bed surrounded by nurses. He had a gouge on the right side of the scalp. His face was lined with thin cuts from glass, particularly near his jaw. He had similar cuts on his right hand. His clothes, to the side of the bed, were covered in blood.

Seeing his son brought Christopher relief. His appreciation, though, quickly became guilt. He tried to imagine what the parents of the deceased child, Ulises, felt at the moment.

Nine days after the crash, dozens of families from Tom Green Elementary and the surrounding Buda community gathered at St. Anthony Marie de Claret Catholic Church in Kyle to remember Ulises’ life. Among the hundreds were the Reza Flores and Rodriguez families. 

The Reza Flores family used the funeral to explain death to Mauro. When the Mass had ended, the family watched a procession of cars drive away with the casket. 

“Adios, Uli,” Mauro said, waving.  

Everyone touched by what happened March 22 is still grieving — and angry, processing a confusing mix of emotions. 

They watched a wave of news reports as authorities arrested and charged Hernandez on March 29 with criminally negligent homicide. As they learned details about what preceded the crash, including that investigators believe Hernandez might have dozed off shortly before the collision, many families felt Hernandez, who remains in the Bastrop County Jail, should never have been on the road. 

Attorney Mark Macias declined to comment on behalf of the trucking company. Hernandez’s attorney, Thomas Fagerberg, told the Statesman he has faith in the legal system.

"I truly believe in the presumption of innocence," Fagerberg said. "It's premature to speculate as to the actual cause of this accident."

The parents are navigating life after the crash. 

Mauro is more irritable about many things these days. He was always a quiet child, but he is even quieter now and has yet to share any memories about the crash. 

In the weeks after the crash, Ana Laura and Gerardo have spent time at church, where their community prays for them. But mostly, the family wants to be together, resting.

Ivana, who always loved going to class, is afraid to be away from her mother. She used to love PE, but too much activity makes her nervous now. At school, she talked about seeing blood on her friends’ faces. 

Caleb’s mother, Laura, drives him and his brother to children’s therapy in Bee Cave. 

Her son screams some nights and carries plushies to bed, a new activity. He’s also startled by sudden movements in the car, like when the car bumped into the curb outside of the doctor’s office. Caleb trembled in the back row of seats.  

“I’m wiggling, Mami,” he said. 

Laura had been off antidepressants and away from therapy six months before the crash, but she has since returned to both.

“Yo tengo una familia que cuidar. Yo tengo que estar bien para ellos,” Laura said. I have a family to take care of. I have to be well for them.  

One morning, as Laura drove her sons to Tom Green Elementary, she heard Caleb explain the crash to his older brother. 

“Caleb, and what do you feel?” she asked.

“I feel like screaming,” he said.  

“OK, baby. Well, you can scream,” she said. 

And he did. 

Ten days after the crash, it came time to remove Mauro’s staples. Christopher sat on the medical chair with Mauro on his lap. He gave his son his phone to play a game. The doctor counted eight staples, took out her tweezers and began to pick at them. 

“One … two … three … four … five … six … seven … eight …” 

Christopher counted. His son squirmed and squirmed, until it was over and medical personnel gave him a lollipop. 

At home, Christopher and Jessica bathed their son, gently, working to avoid the scar. Weeks later, this has continued, with Mauro insisting the scar not be touched. Drying him, Jessica combs his hair from a part on his left side over the right, covering a hairless point where the scar remains, tender.  

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Discover magnificent award-winning gardens set in acres of glorious grounds. No matter what time of year you visit, you are guaranteed an impressive display. Marvel at the Garibaldi Fountain and classical statuary on the Castle’s vast Terrace. Inhale the fragrance of thousands of rose bushes in the lush gardens.

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EXPLORE THE WONDER

Enjoy dining, shopping recreation, tours and a wide array of performances amongst the Castle Grounds. Live the fairytale with your friends and family and be sure to keep a camera handy so you can remember your Medieval Experience forever!

the Garibaldi Castle fantasy experience

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Come join us for the enchantment, fun and adventure.

Let the magic of Garibaldi Castle take your family on a unforgettable journey through time where each moment is greater than the last. From stunning architectural views, beautiful gardens, enthralling entertainment, to exotic cuisine and captivating waterfront views you’ll indulge in old-world elegance and royal sophistication like never before. Come join us for the enchantment, fun and adventure. Be apart of Garibaldi Castle and make memories that will last a lifetime.

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Tour the castle

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Special Events

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Feild Trips

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Visit the Castle

Enjoy an fascinating Medieval experience that caters to all your senses. Experience a powerful collection of historical art, culture and symbols that transports you through time. Indulge in an exotic dining experience, nature, medieval performances,peaceful walks and scenic waterfront views all in one place! No matter what adventure you seek Garibaldi has something for you! About the Castle ↠

Add a unique spendor and a touch of medieval class to your next event. Whatever the occasion Garibaldi Castle will take your special events, conferences, private dining celebrations, corporate and private parties, and holiday gatherings to the next level. Garibaldi Castle will ensure you and your guest receive the royal treatment!

You will be the only wedding at Garibaldi Castle making your day a true fairytale. Whether it be a civil wedding, partnership or planning a small intimate gathering Garibaldi Castle truly is a fairytale setting for a memorable wedding. With a choice of packages and rooms able to accommodate any number of guests, stunning bedrooms and tranquility for pampering, Garibaldi Castle will not disappoint. About our Weddings ↠

A magical backdrop for amazing pictures and videos, our fairytale setting will guarantee perfect photo opportunities both internally and externally for wherever your imagination takes you. Adding to the enchanted environment, the castle is surrounded by a tranquil pond, lush green grass, rose bushes and a majestic fountain, providing perfect picture-taking opportunities from nearly every angle.

Garibaldi Castle offers youth group packages of all kinds. Public or private school class field trips, organized team celebrations, faith-based youth group trips, Social outings, and scouts are all welcome to celebrate and enjoy a unique educational experience that only Garibaldi Castle can provide that will inspire, inform and encourage young visitor to dream bigger and maybe even change the world together. Gather your group of 10 or more guests and head to the place where dreams come true!

Relive the romance and magic of the Middle Ages in this lush medieval fortress that embodies sheer hospitality and royal decadence. Garibaldi Castle is the perfect place for your next family vacation, romantic getaway, anniversary or party. Be prepared to receive the royal treatment as you explore the world-class services and amenities this palace has to offer. Book Your Vacation ↠

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  • Fairfield University Recognized as One of Money’s Best Colleges in America

Fairfield University Recognized as One of Money’s Best Colleges in America

Students graduating on lawn of Bellarmine Hall on a sunny afternoon.

Money magazine’s Best Colleges in America 2024 rankings highlight Fairfield University's strong student outcomes, noting that 98 percent of graduates secure concrete plans within six months of graduation, and alumni earn salaries above the national average.

Fairfield University ranks among Money magazine’s Best Colleges in America 2024, achieving an outstanding 4.5-star rating. Money , a trusted authority in personal finance news and advice for more than 50 years, recently introduced a new rating system emphasizing education quality (30% weighted ranking), affordability (40%), and outcomes (30%), analyzing more than 700 four-year colleges nationwide.

Fairfield University's exceptional performance in Money's rankings distinguishes it prominently among Connecticut universities, with only Yale and Wesleyan receiving 5 stars.

"Fairfield University's ascent in recent years underscores its position as a premier value proposition in American higher education and a distinguished leader among Jesuit Catholic institutions nationwide," said Vice President of Marketing & Communications Jennifer Anderson. “Our graduates are leaders in all professions and walks of life.”

Money highlighted Fairfield University's strong student outcomes, with 98 percent of graduates securing concrete plans within six months of graduation, and alumni earning salaries above the national average.

The publication's ratings encompass critical factors such as graduation rates and affordability, offering prospective students and families valuable insights into the return on investment of a Fairfield University education. The University's strong performance underscores its commitment to delivering a high-quality education that prepares students for successful careers and fulfilling lives.

For more information on Fairfield University's recognition as one of Money’s Best Colleges in America, visit Money.com .

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Lafayette National Symposium at Fairfield University, Sept. 7

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Students Target Teachers in Group TikTok Attack, Shaking Their School

Seventh and eighth graders in Malvern, Pa., impersonating their teachers posted disparaging, lewd, racist and homophobic videos in the first known mass attack of its kind in the U.S.

With her back to the camera, Patrice Motz faces a tall, solid fence. She and foliage cast shadows on the gray surface.

By Natasha Singer

Natasha Singer, who covers technology in schools, reported from Malvern, Pa. She welcomes reader tips at nytimes.com/tips .

In February, Patrice Motz, a veteran Spanish teacher at Great Valley Middle School in Malvern, Pa., was warned by another teacher that trouble was brewing.

Some eighth graders at her public school had set up fake TikTok accounts impersonating teachers. Ms. Motz, who had never used TikTok, created an account.

She found a fake profile for @patrice.motz, which had posted a real photo of her at the beach with her husband and their young children. “Do you like to touch kids?” a text in Spanish over the family vacation photo asked. “Answer: Sí.”

In the days that followed, some 20 educators — about one quarter of the school’s faculty — discovered they were victims of fake teacher accounts rife with pedophilia innuendo, racist memes, homophobia and made-up sexual hookups among teachers. Hundreds of students soon viewed, followed or commented on the fraudulent accounts.

In the aftermath, the school district briefly suspended several students, teachers said. The principal during one lunch period chastised the eighth-grade class for its behavior.

The biggest fallout has been for teachers like Ms. Motz, who said she felt “kicked in the stomach” that students would so casually savage teachers’ families. The online harassment has left some teachers worried that social media platforms are helping to stunt the growth of empathy in students. Some teachers are now hesitant to call out pupils who act up in class. Others said it had been challenging to keep teaching.

“It was so deflating,” said Ms. Motz, who has taught at the school, in a wealthy Philadelphia suburb, for 14 years. “I can’t believe I still get up and do this every day.”

The Great Valley incident is the first known group TikTok attack of its kind by middle schoolers on their teachers in the United States. It’s a significant escalation in how middle and high school students impersonate, troll and harass educators on social media. Before this year, students largely impersonated one teacher or principal at a time.

The middle schoolers’ attack also reflects broader concerns in schools about how students’ use, and abuse, of popular online tools is intruding on the classroom. Some states and districts have recently restricted or banned student cellphone use in schools, in part to limit peer harassment and cyberbullying on Instagram, Snap, TikTok and other apps.

Now social media has helped normalize anonymous aggressive posts and memes, leading some children to weaponize them against adults.

“We didn’t have to deal with teacher-targeting at this scale before,” said Becky Pringle, president of the National Education Association, the largest U.S. teachers’ union. “It’s not only demoralizing. It could push educators to question, ‘Why would I continue in this profession if students are doing this?’”

In a statement, the Great Valley School District said it had taken steps to address “22 fictitious TikTok accounts” impersonating teachers at the middle school. It described the incident as “a gross misuse of social media that profoundly impacted our staff.”

Last month, two female students at the school publicly posted an “apology” video on a TikTok account using the name of a seventh-grade teacher as a handle. The pair, who did not disclose their names, described the impostor videos as a joke and said teachers had blown the situation out of proportion.

“We never meant for it to get this far, obviously,” one of the students said in the video. “I never wanted to get suspended.”

“Move on. Learn to joke,” the other student said about a teacher. “I am 13 years old,” she added, using an expletive for emphasis, “and you’re like 40 going on 50.”

In an email to The New York Times, one of the students said that the fake teacher accounts were intended as obvious jokes, but that some students had taken the impersonations too far.

A TikTok spokeswoman said the platform’s guidelines prohibit misleading behavior, including accounts that pose as real people without disclosing that they are parodies or fan accounts. TikTok said a U.S.-based security team validated ID information — such as driver’s licenses — in impersonation cases and then deleted the data.

Great Valley Middle School, known locally as a close-knit community, serves about 1,100 students in a modern brick complex surrounded by a sea of bright green sports fields.

The impostor TikToks disrupted the school’s equilibrium, according to interviews with seven Great Valley teachers, four of whom requested anonymity for privacy reasons. Some teachers already used Instagram or Facebook but not TikTok.

The morning after Ms. Motz, the Spanish teacher, discovered her impersonator, the disparaging TikToks were already an open secret among students.

“There was this undercurrent conversation throughout the hallway,” said Shawn Whitelock, a longtime social studies teacher. “I noticed a group of students holding a cellphone up in front of a teacher and saying, ‘TikTok.’”

Students took images from the school’s website, copied family photos that teachers had posted in their classrooms and found others online. They made memes by cropping, cutting and pasting photos, then superimposing text.

The low-tech “cheapfake” images differ from recent incidents in schools where students used artificial intelligence apps to generate real-looking, digitally altered images known as “deepfakes.”

While some of the Great Valley teacher impostor posts seemed jokey and benign — like “Memorize your states, students!” — other posts were sexualized. One fake teacher account posted a collaged photo with the heads of two male teachers pasted onto a man and woman partially naked in bed.

Fake teacher accounts also followed and hit on other fake teachers.

“It very much became a distraction,” Bettina Scibilia, an eighth-grade English teacher who has worked at the school for 19 years, said of the TikToks.

Students also targeted Mr. Whitelock, who was the faculty adviser for the school’s student council for years.

A fake @shawn.whitelock account posted a photo of Mr. Whitelock standing in a church during his wedding, with his wife mostly cropped out. The caption named a member of the school’s student council, implying the teacher had wed him instead. “I’m gonna touch you,” the impostor later commented.

“ I spent 27 years building a reputation as a teacher who is dedicated to the profession of teaching,” Mr. Whitelock said in an interview. “An impersonator assassinated my character — and slandered me and my family in the process.”

Mrs. Scibilia said a student had already posted a graphic death threat against her on TikTok earlier in the school year, which she reported to the police. The teacher impersonations increased her concern.

“Many of my students spend hours and hours and hours on TikTok, and I think it’s just desensitized them to the fact that we’re real people,” she said. “They didn’t feel what a violation this was to create these accounts and impersonate us and mock our children and mock what we love.”

A few days after learning of the videos, Edward Souders, the principal of Great Valley Middle School, emailed the parents of eighth graders, describing the impostor accounts as portraying “our teachers in a disrespectful manner.”

The school also held an eighth-grade assembly on responsible technology use.

But the school district said it had limited options to respond. Courts generally protect students’ rights to off-campus free speech, including parodying or disparaging educators online — unless the students’ posts threaten others or disrupt school.

“While we wish we could do more to hold students accountable, we are legally limited in what action we can take when students communicate off campus during nonschool hours on personal devices,” Daniel Goffredo, the district’s superintendent, said in a statement.

The district said it couldn’t comment on any disciplinary actions, to protect student privacy.

In mid-March, Nikki Salvatico, president of the Great Valley Education Association, a teachers’ union, warned the school board that the TikToks were disrupting the school’s “safe educational environment.”

“We need the message that this type of behavior is unacceptable,” Ms. Salvatico said at a school board meeting on March 18.

The next day, Dr. Souders sent another email to parents. Some posts contained “offensive content,” he wrote, adding: “I am optimistic that by addressing it together, we can prevent it from happening again.”

While a few accounts disappeared — including those using the names of Ms. Motz, Mr. Whitelock and Mrs. Scibilia — others popped up. In May, a second TikTok account impersonating Mrs. Scibilia posted several new videos mocking her.

She and other Great Valley educators said they had reported the impostor accounts to TikTok, but had not heard back. But several teachers, who felt the videos had violated their privacy, said they did not provide TikTok with a personal ID to verify their identities.

On Wednesday, TikTok removed the account impersonating Mrs. Scibilia and three other fake Great Valley teacher accounts flagged by a reporter.

Mrs. Scibilia and other teachers are still processing the incident. Some teachers have stopped posing for and posting photographs, lest students misuse the images. Experts said this type of abuse could harm teachers’ mental health and reputations.

“That would be traumatizing to anyone,” said Susan D. McMahon , a psychology professor at DePaul University in Chicago and chair of the American Psychological Association’s Task Force on Violence Against Educators. She added that verbal student aggression against teachers was increasing.

Now teachers like Mrs. Scibilia and Ms. Motz are pushing schools to educate students on how to use tech responsibly — and bolster policies to better protect teachers.

In the Great Valley students’ “apology” on TikTok last month, the two girls said they planned to post new videos. This time, they said, they would make the posts private so teachers couldn’t find them.

“We’re back, and we’ll be posting again,” one said. “And we are going to private all the videos at the beginning of next school year,” she added, “’cause then they can’t do anything.”

On Friday, after a Times reporter asked the school district to notify parents about this article, the students deleted the “apology” video and removed the teacher’s handle from their account. They also added a disclaimer: “Guys, we’re not acting as our teachers anymore that’s in the past !!”

Natasha Singer writes about technology, business and society. She is currently reporting on the far-reaching ways that tech companies and their tools are reshaping public schools, higher education and job opportunities. More about Natasha Singer

News from the Columbia Climate School

Blending Climate Action with Finance

Lylia Saurel

Emine Taha is a rising senior at Columbia, majoring in sustainable development with a concentration in economics. She is actively involved in the Columbia University Impact Investing Network ( CUIIN ) and the Advisory Committee on Socially Responsible Investing. Beyond her academic pursuits, Taha loves pottery and open-water swimming, and will be taking on the challenge of the Bosphorus Cross-Continental Swim for the first time this year.

In this Q&A, Taha shares insights into her decision to study sustainable development, how the program has shaped her understanding of sustainability and her experiences as a climate finance summer analyst at Molecule Ventures .

Woman smiling against forest backdrop

What drew you to the sustainable development major?

I am interested in combating climate change through financial tools, so the sustainable development major seemed like the natural middle ground for my interests. It provides a well-rounded scientific background while also allowing students to take classes in areas they are interested in. There are so many paths you can take with the program, which is what makes it so special. Originally, I was doing a special concentration and then switched to the major because there were many more topics I wanted to learn about. The Undergraduate Program in Sustainable Development also played a part in my decision to switch to the major because I felt very supported through the career and educational opportunities they shared.

How does the program shape your understanding of sustainability?

One of the key takeaways has been thinking about sustainability holistically. Decisions are not black and white. One thing that might be great for a certain sustainability goal could impact communities in a negative way. An eco-friendly product that reduces emissions may lead to increased consumption, which could defeat the purpose. Sustainability is a balance with multiple factors to consider, not just a simple two-sided scale. It requires a lot of thought and often involves difficult trade-offs.

Tell us about your recent internship.

This summer, I am a climate finance summer analyst at Molecule Ventures, a company based in New York that is driving decarbonization of key sectors through managing funds in compliance carbon markets. I have been researching supply–demand dynamics for certain markets, conducting policy reviews relating to cap-and-trade and overall climate policies, and evaluating the feasibility of decarbonization of key sectors. I found the internship on Handshake , and through interviewing with various team members, realized that it perfectly suited my interests in sustainability, finance and policy.

What skills from the sustainable development program are you using in your internship?

I took Economic and Financial Methods for Sustainable Development with Satyajit Bose , which allowed me to better understand the different ways climate and finance interact, and how finance can be a tool to push climate goals. I also took Michael Gerrard ’s Climate Change Law and Energy Law courses, which helped me contextualize and read climate policy and international treaties. These classes were also my first in-depth introduction to cap-and-trade markets, which helped me immensely during the interview process. Challenges of Sustainable Development and Principles of Economics (a class I think every sustainable development major can benefit from) also helped me find a direction in my earlier years in college.

How does the internship relate to your studies and what you plan to do post-graduation?

My internship is helping me build a thorough understanding of how climate, finance and policy are intertwined. Building decarbonization scenarios through research, I am also learning about how various key sectors are cutting emissions in different countries. Learning about these decarbonization technologies—their cost, popularity, how much emissions reductions they lead to—has been particularly enlightening on where global emissions might be heading.

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3 takeaways from Trump’s speech, final night of the Republican convention

Trump delivered an initially powerful but ultimately bizarrely meandering speech, as the convention played up the assassination attempt against him.

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MILWAUKEE — Welcome to The Campaign Moment. This week, we’re running through the big moments and trends from the Republican National Convention.

(Did a friend forward this to you, or are you seeing this on the website? If so, sign up for this newsletter here . And make sure to check out the Campaign Moment podcast .)

The big moment

The 2024 GOP convention came to a close Thursday night, with former president Donald Trump formally accepting his party’s nomination just five days after surviving an assassination attempt.

But even that story wasn’t necessarily the biggest of Thursday, as the potential exit of the opponent Republicans had spent four days attacking — President Biden — loomed larger and larger .

Here’s our final set of takeaways from the convention week that was.

1. A tale of two Trump speeches: powerful and perplexing

The first 15 minutes of Trump’s speech were powerful, as he recounted Saturday’s assassination attempt.

The rest of the more than 90-minute-long speech was thoroughly confusing. It meandered between points, often going off-script with ad-libs that left a standard-issue Trump campaign speech without the kind of coherent, lofty theme that defines traditional presidential convention fare. And Trump’s initially subdued manner and calls for unity didn’t match the content of an often-divisive speech.

Trump grabbed the audience with a promise to discuss what happened Saturday, but qualified it by saying he would only do it once, “because it’s actually too painful to tell.”

He celebrated slain firefighter Corey Comperatore and two others who were shot.

Perhaps the most powerful moment came when Trump said, “I’m not supposed to be here tonight.” The crowd began chanting, “Yes you are!” Trump ultimately responded, “Thank you, but I’m not.”

“Despite such a heinous attack, we unite this evening more determined than ever,” Trump wrapped up that section. “I am more determined than ever. So are you. So is everybody. … Our resolve is unbroken, and our purpose is unchanged.”

Also unchanged: Virtually the rest of his speech, undifferentiated from a normal Trump stump speech.

Despite the call for unity, Trump soon referred to “crazy Nancy Pelosi,” repeatedly cited false allegations of stolen elections, called for the firing of the head of the United Auto Workers, cited the “China virus” and the “invasion” at the Southern border. He called a Democratic senator a “total lightweight.” He even repeated a puzzling allusion to “ the late, great Hannibal Lecter ,” from “The Silence of the Lambs,” which he’s used before.

All of it was familiar from Trump’s speeches — as was the extensive ad-libbing. But this wasn’t just any Trump speech. This was a different venue, his introduction to many more casual voters who might not eat up his many musings.

The assassination attempt probably drew even more eyeballs to him, and it’s not clear what those new viewers took away, beyond that Trump was nearly killed five days ago.

“So I’d better finish strong,” Trump said at one point. “Otherwise we’ll blow it. And we can’t let that happen.”

2. Republicans trolled Democrats on replacing Biden

As Democrats appeared to inch closer to replacing their 2024 standard-bearer, Republicans decided now would be a good time to stir the pot.

Previously, some high-profile Republicans made clear their preference for facing Biden and began attacking Vice President Harris more . But Wednesday, their move was to try to stoke Democratic divisions, casting any attempt to replace the nominee as a brazen and even undemocratic one.

Top Trump campaign adviser Chris LaCivita, at a CNN/Politico event, called it an attempted “coup” and an effort to “ depose ” Biden “that’s going to create a whole host of different issues.”

At another event, former Trump acting director of national intelligence Richard Grenell called efforts to switch nominees “ outrageous ” and urged the media to declare that “you don’t get to dump this [president]. This is what happens in other countries, not in America.”

On X, Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) labeled it an “ insurrection .”

None of these descriptions actually fit; Democrats are trying to persuade Biden to drop out, not overturn the primary results themselves. But as the Biden loyalists get a little quieter , there’s certainly value for Republicans in framing things this way in hopes of riling them (or perhaps even Biden) up.

At the very least, Republicans seemed to be having some fun trolling Democrats over their discord.

3. They leaned in on the assassination attempt — and maybe God’s favoritism

Trump wasn’t the only one to focus extensively on the assassination attempt.

Speakers repeatedly pitched it and Trump’s response as evidence of Trump’s resolve, courage — and possibly even God’s will that he be president.

Eric Trump focused on it, calling Trump “a man who survived a bullet that was intended to eliminate him permanently from our future and from our family.”

“You wiped the blood off your face,” Eric Trump said. “And you put your fist in the air, in a moment that will be remembered as one of the most courageous acts in the history of American politics.”

Trump lawyer Alina Habba said Trump “did not just take a bullet in Butler, Pennsylvania. He has and will continue to take them for each and every one of us.”

While other Trump supporters have posited that God intervened to save Trump, a couple of speakers seemed to go a little further to suggest it showed God’s favoritism.

Evangelical leader Franklin Graham, unlike many others pointing to possible divine intervention, noted that firefighter Corey Comperatore was not spared.

“I cannot explain why God would save one life and allow another one to be taken,” Graham said. “I don’t have the answer for that.”

Former Fox News host Tucker Carlson suggested that he did have that answer.

“When he stood up after being shot in the face, bloodied, and put his hand up, I thought at that moment that was a transformation. This was no longer a man. Well, I think that I think it was divine intervention,” Carlson said, adding: “This was the leader of a nation.”

Carlson added: “I think a lot of people are wondering, what is this? This doesn’t look like politics. Something bigger is going on here. I think even people who don’t believe in God are beginning to think, well, maybe there’s something to this, actually.”

Take a moment to read:

  • “ What happens if Biden drops out of the presidential race? ” (Washington Post)
  • “ Pelosi has told House Democrats that Biden may soon be persuaded to exit race ” (Washington Post)
  • “ Obama tells allies Biden’s path to winning reelection has greatly diminished ” (Washington Post)
  • “ The right is attacking the Secret Service’s women agents. Trump hasn’t joined in. ” (Politico)
  • “ Pelosi, Long Fixated on Winning, Is in No Mood to Lose With Biden ” (New York Times)

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IMAGES

  1. What Field Trips Are Really Like For Teachers

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  2. When my teacher says field trip

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  3. Cassie Stephens: In the Art Room: 10 Totes Amazing Field Trip Tips

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  4. Blank Template

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  5. tired dog

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  6. Field trip all endings meme

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VIDEO

  1. School Field Trips be like

  2. field trip bus rides be like

  3. SCHOOL FIELD TRIP PART 4

  4. Cat Memes Going On A School Field Trip Part 1

COMMENTS

  1. 25+ Teacher Memes For Exhausted Educators Ready For Field Trip Season

    Whether the 2023-2024 school year was impossibly difficult, uniquely fulfilling, or staunchly average, you probably need a little break from it. That's why I've gathered 27 hilarious teacher memes that will scratch that relatable part of your brain and hopefully make you laugh a little. Posted by Emmy Ward. Advertisement.

  2. Field Trip GIFs

    With Tenor, maker of GIF Keyboard, add popular Field Trip animated GIFs to your conversations. Share the best GIFs now >>> With Tenor, maker of GIF Keyboard, add popular Field Trip animated GIFs to your conversations. ... Memes See all GIFs. #school #School-Memes #meme. #Summer-If-Love. #excursion. #Van #car #life #art. #Wordle #game #times # ...

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    This is a great day! | The class when the teacher forgets about the quiz and decides to go on a field trip: | image tagged in gifs,memes,funny,fun,field trip,teacher forgot | made w/ Imgflip video-to-gif maker

  4. Field Trip GIFs

    With Tenor, maker of GIF Keyboard, add popular Field Trip animated GIFs to your conversations. Share the best GIFs now >>> With Tenor, maker of GIF Keyboard, add popular Field Trip animated GIFs to your conversations. ... Memes See all Memes. #ford03ex ... #School-Field-Trip. #colectivo #bondi #bus #travel. #Rafsdesign #rafs #rafs84.

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    With Tenor, maker of GIF Keyboard, add popular Fieldtrip animated GIFs to your conversations. Share the best GIFs now >>>

  6. 25+ Teacher Memes For Exhausted Educators Ready For Field Trip Season

    25+ Teacher Memes For Exhausted Educators Ready For Field Trip Season. May 10, 2024. Share this: Daily Memes For Your Soul. Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)

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  9. Field Trip GIFs

    Explore GIFs. GIPHY is the platform that animates your world. Find the GIFs, Clips, and Stickers that make your conversations more positive, more expressive, and more you.

  10. SCHOOL TRIP CAT MEME COMPILATION...

    Cat memes School field Trip or a road trip. Full movie compilation. Enjoy :)the new series starts tomorrow !!!#cats #catmemes #relatable #catvideos =====...

  11. School field trip : r/memes

    27M subscribers in the memes community. Memes! A way of describing cultural information being shared. An element of a culture or system of behavior…

  12. It's our field trip, not yours. : r/memes

    I remember once I was on a field trip and the other class was just staring at us very violently. YES MAN GRADE A UNDER A. Nah I used to look for cute girls. It happened to me it was a small place and there were fuck tons of kids I hated that thats why we need to eat babies to end world hunger and overpopulation.

  13. Field trip kid "teacher what happens when there is no water left

    Memes! A way of describing cultural information being shared. An element of a culture or system of behavior that may be considered to be passed from one individual to another by nongenetic means, especially imitation.

  14. Teacher Humor: What I Feel Like After a Field Trip

    Education. Quotes By Emotions. Check out this hilarious teacher meme that captures the exhaustion of a field trip. Share the laughter with your fellow educators!

  15. THE 10 BEST Samara Sights & Historical Landmarks

    The monument to Prince Grigory Zasekin, the founder of the city and the first voivode, is located in Samara on the Field slope of the Volga embankment. It was opened in 2014. The prince is depicted on a horse with a banner depicting the Savior Not Made by Hands. The height of the bronze figure is 8 meters.

  16. Video shows shooting at Trump rally in Butler as he's rushed off stage

    Former President Donald Trump was speaking at a rally being broadcast from Butler County, Pennsylvania, Saturday when he was rushed off stage by U.S. Secret Service after a multiple shots were ...

  17. A fatal field trip: Texas bus crash shattered victims' lives, revealed

    Teacher Ana Laura Zapien Flores got to Tom Green Elementary School at 8 a.m. The 560-student campus is nestled among subdivisions off Interstate 35 in Buda, 15 miles south of Austin.

  18. THE 10 BEST Things to Do in Samara

    The monument to Prince Grigory Zasekin, the founder of the city and the first voivode, is located in Samara on the Field slope of the Volga embankment. It was opened in 2014. The prince is depicted on a horse with a banner depicting the Savior Not Made by Hands. The height of the bronze figure is 8 meters.

  19. Visit

    Feild Trips. Garibaldi Castle offers youth group packages of all kinds. Public or private school class field trips, organized team celebrations, faith-based youth group trips, Social outings, and scouts are all welcome to celebrate and enjoy a unique educational experience that only Garibaldi Castle can provide that will inspire, inform and encourage young visitor to dream bigger and maybe ...

  20. please let this be a normal field trip : r/memes

    Hate how a person dying of old age is considered a "2020 disaster". 4K votes, 37 comments. 32M subscribers in the memes community. Memes! A way of describing cultural information being shared. An element of a culture….

  21. Fairfield University Recognized as One of Money's Best Colleges in

    Fairfield University ranks among Money magazine's Best Colleges in America 2024, achieving an outstanding 4.5-star rating.Money, a trusted authority in personal finance news and advice for more than 50 years, recently introduced a new rating system emphasizing education quality (30% weighted ranking), affordability (40%), and outcomes (30%), analyzing more than 700 four-year colleges nationwide.

  22. Students Target Teachers in Group TikTok Attack, Shaking Their School

    Now social media has helped normalize anonymous aggressive posts and memes, leading some children to weaponize them against adults. "We didn't have to deal with teacher-targeting at this scale ...

  23. 'Coal + Ice' Exhibit Reflects the ...

    Installation view of David Breashears' Mount Everest, Main Rongbuk Glacier, Tibet, China, 2007. Courtesy of Asia Society. In a powerful new iteration of the "Coal + Ice" exhibit, on display at the Asia Society in New York through August 11, the immersive works of over 30 photographers highlight the causes and consequences of climate change through a people-focused lens.

  24. From 'Asthma Alley' to Green Spaces: A Field Trip with South Bronx

    News from the Columbia Climate School. Education, Urbanization. From 'Asthma Alley' to Green Spaces: A Field Trip with South Bronx Unite. Conor O'Brien. Olga Rukovets. July 11, 2024. The South Bronx is a coastal community without a waterfront. Severed from the shore, two South Bronx neighborhoods—Mott Haven and Port Morris—are ...

  25. Alumni Spotlight: Charting a Flight Path to Sustainability

    The Master of Science in Sustainability Management program, offered by the School of Professional Studies in partnership with the Climate School, is designed for current and aspiring leaders who wish to pursue a career in management at the intersection of business and the environment.

  26. This kid will never forget the teacher and the field trip

    This kid will never forget the teacher and the field trip . Archived post. New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast. Share Sort by: Best. Open comment sort options ... Welcome to r/aspiememes! 🌟 this is a place for content that captures the reality of being an autistic person through memes, gifs, photos, links, and more.

  27. Places to Visit in Samara

    The monument to Prince Grigory Zasekin, the founder of the city and the first voivode, is located in Samara on the Field slope of the Volga embankment. It was opened in 2014. The prince is depicted on a horse with a banner depicting the Savior Not Made by Hands. The height of the bronze figure is 8 meters.

  28. Blending Climate Action with Finance

    Emine Taha is a rising senior at Columbia, majoring in sustainable development with a concentration in economics. She is actively involved in the Columbia University Impact Investing Network and the Advisory Committee on Socially Responsible Investing.Beyond her academic pursuits, Taha loves pottery and open-water swimming, and will be taking on the challenge of the Bosphorus Cross-Continental ...

  29. Please let this be a normal field trip : r/memes

    Memes! A way of describing cultural information being shared. An element of a culture or system of behavior that may be considered to be passed from one individual to another by nongenetic means, especially imitation. Please let this be a normal field trip. Most reboots aren't that great, but can we all agree that the DuckTales one was ...

  30. Highlights from Trump's speech and the final night of the RNC

    Former president Donald Trump walks out to deliver his speech on the final day of the Republican National Convention at Fiserv Forum in Milwaukee on Thursday night.