• Entering, Transiting and Departing

Entering Singapore

To ensure a smooth journey, travellers seeking to enter Singapore should comply with the  Entry and  Public Health requirements listed below.

1) General Entry Requirements

To enter Singapore, travellers must meet the following immigration requirements:

i) Passport Validity

  • Have minimum 6-month passport validity if you are not a Singapore passport holder
  • Short term travellers holding a passport or travel document from a visa-required country/region must  apply for a Visa
  • Visa-required travellers can use the  Visa-Free Transit Facility  for stay of less than 96 hours in Singapore, if eligible

iii) Security and Immigration Processes on Arrival

  • Ensure that you do not bring prohibited items  into Singapore
  • Familiarise yourself with  immigration/customs clearance procedures , including whether you are eligible for automated clearance
  • Short-Term travellers should have sufficient cash and proof of onward travel (tickets, visas), and ensure that you do not stay beyond your visit pass validity. You may retrieve your e-Pass after arrival using the  e-Pass Enquiry Portal  or check your visit pass validity using the  visit pass validity tool .
  • Those transiting/transferring through Singapore without seeking immigration clearance; and
  • Singapore citizens, Permanent Residents and Long-Term Pass Holders entering via land checkpoints.

Submission of SGAC is Free and can be done via the SGAC e-Service  or MyICA Mobile app . Please refer to SGAC with Electronic Health Declaration  for more information.

Short Term Visitors

  • Visitors who wish to stay beyond the period of stay granted can apply for a  visit pass extension  online using the  e-Service . Applications are subject to approval.
  • Travellers on short-term visit pass are also not permitted to engage in any business, professional or paid employment activities when in Singapore. Overstaying is also a punishable offence in Singapore.

COVID-19 Vaccination for Permanent Residence and Long-Term Pass

  • Refer to  MOH's FAQs  on how to keep your COVID-19 vaccination status up-to-date in Singapore.
  • Work pass holders should refer to  MOM's website  for details on vaccination requirements, and are advised to take their COVID-19 boosters before entering Singapore to avoid delays for their pass issuance.
  • From 1 Apr 2023 , persons who recently recovered from COVID-19 will no longer enjoy temporary exemption from COVID-19 vaccination requirements.

2) Public Health Requirements

To avoid tests and quarantine, travellers must fulfil the public health requirements below. Travellers who cannot meet the public health requirements and refuse any test(s) and/or quarantine may be turned away from Singapore.

Produce an International Certificate of Vaccination for Yellow Fever , if you have visited any country at risk of Yellow Fever transmission  in the six (6) days prior to arrival in Singapore.

Travellers must serve quarantine for six (6) days from date of departure from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission if they cannot meet the requirement. Quarantine also applies to those who are ineligible to receive the vaccination e.g., children aged one year and below and individuals with contraindications, and travellers whose yellow fever vaccination certificate has yet to become valid.

There are no longer any COVID-19 measures for travellers arriving in Singapore from 13 Feb 2023 , regardless of vaccination status or traveller profile.

Related Links

  • Entry for Sea Crew/Pleasure Craft Owners
  • Cargo and Postal Article Requirements
  • Woodlands and Tuas Checkpoints Traffic Updates
  • Requirements for Transiting in Singapore
  • Taking Cash In and Out of Singapore

singapore tourism vaccination requirements

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Advisory on COVID-19 for Travellers and Tourism Businesses

13 February 2023

General Advisory for Travellers

1. Singapore is open to all travellers without quarantine. This includes non-fully vaccinated travellers. Covid-19 pre-departure tests are not required. More details are available  here. 2. Depending on the destination you are travelling from, mask-wearing aboard flights and ferries to Singapore may be required. Travellers are advised to check with the respective transport operator on the mask-wearing requirement prior to their trip.

3. Singapore has stepped down all COVID-19 measures and mask wearing is not required except in healthcare settings. However, do practise good personal hygiene and wear a mask if you are unwell.

USEFUL LINKS

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For MOH's latest measures, please click here.

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For MOM's latest advisories, please click here.

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For SFA's requirement for food handlers

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For ESG's latest SMMs, please click  here .

About the Organisation

What industry does your organization fall within, what best describes the key intent of the project that your organisation is seeking funding for, is your organisation a singapore-registered legal entity, is your organisation an association, is the project able to achieve one or more of the following outcome.

  • Increase no. of sailings to/from Singapore
  • Increase no. of foreign cruise passengers to Singapore through sailings to/from Singapore
  • Increase no. of pre/post nights for cruise passengers sailing to/from Singapore
  • Increase capability of industry players via cruise-specific industry training programmes
  • Strengthen the potential/ attractiveness of cruising in Singapore and/or Southeast Asia

Is the project able to achieve one or more of the following?

  • Improve visitor satisfaction (especially foreign visitors)
  • Increase footfall
  • Increase revenue
  • Significant branding and PR value

Is the project able to attract foreign visitors and contribute to foreign visitors' spend?

Who will be the main target audience of your project, is your project innovative and/or a new event in singapore with tourism potential, what best describes your project, does the event have proven track records in singapore or overseas, and/or growth in tourism value such as growing foreign visitorship, and/or enhancement of precinct vibrancy etc, does the project have a clear tourism focus (e.g. tourism-related trainings, tourism companies taking on capability development initiatives or technology companies creating technology products and services for the tourism businesses), what best describes your market feasibility study project.

Based on your selection, the following STB grant/s may be applicable for your project:

Please note that projects that have commenced prior to Singapore Tourism Board's offer may not be eligible for grant support. Examples where projects are deemed as having commenced include:

  • Applicant has started work on the project e.g. tender has been called.
  • Applicant has made payment(s) to any supplier, vendor or third party.
  • Applicant has signed a contractual agreement with any supplier, vendor or third party.

singapore tourism vaccination requirements

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Travel health notices, vaccines and medicines, non-vaccine-preventable diseases, stay healthy and safe.

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After Your Trip

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Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor at least a month before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need. If you or your doctor need help finding a location that provides certain vaccines or medicines, visit the Find a Clinic page.

Routine vaccines

Recommendations.

Make sure you are up-to-date on all routine vaccines before every trip. Some of these vaccines include

  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR)

Immunization schedules

All eligible travelers should be up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines. Please see  Your COVID-19 Vaccination  for more information. 

COVID-19 vaccine

Hepatitis A

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers one year old or older going to Singapore.

Infants 6 to 11 months old should also be vaccinated against Hepatitis A. The dose does not count toward the routine 2-dose series.

Travelers allergic to a vaccine component or who are younger than 6 months should receive a single dose of immune globulin, which provides effective protection for up to 2 months depending on dosage given.

Unvaccinated travelers who are over 40 years old, immunocompromised, or have chronic medical conditions planning to depart to a risk area in less than 2 weeks should get the initial dose of vaccine and at the same appointment receive immune globulin.

Hepatitis A - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep A

Hepatitis B

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers younger than 60 years old traveling to Singapore. Unvaccinated travelers 60 years and older may get vaccinated before traveling to Singapore.

Hepatitis B - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep B

Infants 6 to 11 months old traveling internationally should get 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine before travel. This dose does not count as part of the routine childhood vaccination series.

Measles (Rubeola) - CDC Yellow Book

Singapore is free of dog rabies. However, rabies may still be present in wildlife species, particularly bats. CDC recommends rabies vaccination before travel only for people working directly with wildlife. These people may include veterinarians, animal handlers, field biologists, or laboratory workers working with specimens from mammalian species.

Rabies - CDC Yellow Book

Recommended for most travelers, especially those staying with friends or relatives or visiting smaller cities or rural areas.

Typhoid - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Typhoid

Yellow Fever

Required for travelers ≥1 year old arriving from countries with risk for YF virus transmission; this includes >12-hour airport transits or layovers in countries with risk for YF virus transmission. 1

Yellow Fever - CDC Yellow Book

Avoid contaminated water

Leptospirosis

How most people get sick (most common modes of transmission)

  • Touching urine or other body fluids from an animal infected with leptospirosis
  • Swimming or wading in urine-contaminated fresh water, or contact with urine-contaminated mud
  • Drinking water or eating food contaminated with animal urine
  • Avoid contaminated water and soil

Clinical Guidance

Avoid bug bites.

Chikungunya

  • Mosquito bite
  • Avoid Bug Bites
  • Mosquito bite
  • An infected pregnant woman can spread it to her unborn baby

Airborne & droplet

  • Breathing in air or accidentally eating food contaminated with the urine, droppings, or saliva of infected rodents
  • Bite from an infected rodent
  • Less commonly, being around someone sick with hantavirus (only occurs with Andes virus)
  • Avoid rodents and areas where they live
  • Avoid sick people

Tuberculosis (TB)

  • Breathe in TB bacteria that is in the air from an infected and contagious person coughing, speaking, or singing.

Learn actions you can take to stay healthy and safe on your trip. Vaccines cannot protect you from many diseases in Singapore, so your behaviors are important.

Eat and drink safely

Food and water standards around the world vary based on the destination. Standards may also differ within a country and risk may change depending on activity type (e.g., hiking versus business trip). You can learn more about safe food and drink choices when traveling by accessing the resources below.

  • Choose Safe Food and Drinks When Traveling
  • Water Treatment Options When Hiking, Camping or Traveling
  • Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene | Healthy Water
  • Avoid Contaminated Water During Travel

You can also visit the  Department of State Country Information Pages  for additional information about food and water safety.

Prevent bug bites

Although Singapore is an industrialized country, bug bites here can still spread diseases. Just as you would in the United States, try to avoid bug bites while spending time outside or in wooded areas.

What can I do to prevent bug bites?

  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
  • Use an appropriate insect repellent (see below).
  • Consider using permethrin-treated clothing and gear if spending a lot of time outside. Do not use permethrin directly on skin.

What type of insect repellent should I use?

  • FOR PROTECTION AGAINST TICKS AND MOSQUITOES: Use a repellent that contains 20% or more DEET for protection that lasts up to several hours.
  • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin)
  • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or para-menthane-diol (PMD)
  • 2-undecanone
  • Always use insect repellent as directed.

What should I do if I am bitten by bugs?

  • Avoid scratching bug bites, and apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to reduce the itching.
  • Check your entire body for ticks after outdoor activity. Be sure to remove ticks properly.

What can I do to avoid bed bugs?

Although bed bugs do not carry disease, they are an annoyance. See our information page about avoiding bug bites for some easy tips to avoid them. For more information on bed bugs, see Bed Bugs .

For more detailed information on avoiding bug bites, see Avoid Bug Bites .

Stay safe outdoors

If your travel plans in Singapore include outdoor activities, take these steps to stay safe and healthy during your trip:

  • Stay alert to changing weather conditions and adjust your plans if conditions become unsafe.
  • Prepare for activities by wearing the right clothes and packing protective items, such as bug spray, sunscreen, and a basic first aid kit.
  • Consider learning basic first aid and CPR before travel. Bring a travel health kit with items appropriate for your activities.
  • If you are outside for many hours in the heat, eat salty snacks and drink water to stay hydrated and replace salt lost through sweating.
  • Protect yourself from UV radiation : use sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15, wear protective clothing, and seek shade during the hottest time of day (10 a.m.–4 p.m.).
  • Be especially careful during summer months and at high elevation. Because sunlight reflects off snow, sand, and water, sun exposure may be increased during activities like skiing, swimming, and sailing.
  • Very cold temperatures can be dangerous. Dress in layers and cover heads, hands, and feet properly if you are visiting a cold location.

Stay safe around water

  • Swim only in designated swimming areas. Obey lifeguards and warning flags on beaches.
  • Do not dive into shallow water.
  • Avoid swallowing water when swimming. Untreated water can carry germs that make you sick.
  • Practice safe boating—follow all boating safety laws, do not drink alcohol if you are driving a boat, and always wear a life jacket.

Keep away from animals

Most animals avoid people, but they may attack if they feel threatened, are protecting their young or territory, or if they are injured or ill. Animal bites and scratches can lead to serious diseases such as rabies.

Follow these tips to protect yourself:

  • Do not touch or feed any animals you do not know.
  • Do not allow animals to lick open wounds, and do not get animal saliva in your eyes or mouth.
  • Avoid rodents and their urine and feces.
  • Traveling pets should be supervised closely and not allowed to come in contact with local animals.
  • If you wake in a room with a bat, seek medical care immediately.  Bat bites may be hard to see.

All animals can pose a threat, but be extra careful around dogs, bats, monkeys, sea animals such as jellyfish, and snakes. If you are bitten or scratched by an animal, immediately:

  • Wash the wound with soap and clean water.
  • Go to a doctor right away.
  • Tell your doctor about your injury when you get back to the United States.

Reduce your exposure to germs

Follow these tips to avoid getting sick or spreading illness to others while traveling:

  • Wash your hands often, especially before eating.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, clean hands with hand sanitizer (containing at least 60% alcohol).
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Try to avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home or in your hotel room, unless you need medical care.

Avoid sharing body fluids

Diseases can be spread through body fluids, such as saliva, blood, vomit, and semen.

Protect yourself:

  • Use latex condoms correctly.
  • Do not inject drugs.
  • Limit alcohol consumption. People take more risks when intoxicated.
  • Do not share needles or any devices that can break the skin. That includes needles for tattoos, piercings, and acupuncture.
  • If you receive medical or dental care, make sure the equipment is disinfected or sanitized.

Know how to get medical care while traveling

Plan for how you will get health care during your trip, should the need arise:

  • Carry a list of local doctors and hospitals at your destination.
  • Review your health insurance plan to determine what medical services it would cover during your trip. Consider purchasing travel health and medical evacuation insurance for things your regular insurance will not cover.
  • Carry a card that identifies, in the local language, your blood type, chronic conditions or serious allergies, and the generic names of any medicines you take.
  • Bring copies of your prescriptions for medicine and for eye glasses and contact lenses.
  • Some prescription drugs may be illegal in other countries. Call Singapore’s embassy to verify that all of your prescription(s) are legal to bring with you.
  • Bring all the medicines (including over-the-counter medicines) you think you might need during your trip, including extra in case of travel delays. Ask your doctor to help you get prescriptions filled early if you need to.

Many foreign hospitals and clinics are accredited by the Joint Commission International. A list of accredited facilities is available at their website ( www.jointcommissioninternational.org ).

Select safe transportation

Motor vehicle crashes are the #1 killer of healthy US citizens in foreign countries.

Be smart when you are traveling on foot.

  • Use sidewalks and marked crosswalks.
  • Pay attention to the traffic around you, especially in crowded areas.
  • Remember, people on foot do not always have the right of way in other countries.

Riding/Driving

Choose a safe vehicle.

  • Choose official taxis or public transportation, such as trains and buses.
  • Make sure there are seatbelts.
  • Avoid overcrowded, overloaded, top-heavy buses and minivans.
  • Avoid riding on motorcycles or motorbikes, especially motorbike taxis. (Many crashes are caused by inexperienced motorbike drivers.)
  • Choose newer vehicles—they may have more safety features, such as airbags, and be more reliable.
  • Choose larger vehicles, which may provide more protection in crashes.

Think about the driver.

  • Do not drive after drinking alcohol or ride with someone who has been drinking.
  • Consider hiring a licensed, trained driver familiar with the area.
  • Arrange payment before departing.

Follow basic safety tips.

  • Wear a seatbelt at all times.
  • Sit in the back seat of cars and taxis.
  • When on motorbikes or bicycles, always wear a helmet. (Bring a helmet from home, if needed.)
  • Do not use a cell phone or text while driving (illegal in many countries).
  • Travel during daylight hours only, especially in rural areas.
  • If you choose to drive a vehicle in Singapore, learn the local traffic laws and have the proper paperwork.
  • Get any driving permits and insurance you may need. Get an International Driving Permit (IDP). Carry the IDP and a US-issued driver's license at all times.
  • Check with your auto insurance policy's international coverage, and get more coverage if needed. Make sure you have liability insurance.
  • Avoid using local, unscheduled aircraft.
  • If possible, fly on larger planes (more than 30 seats); larger airplanes are more likely to have regular safety inspections.
  • Try to schedule flights during daylight hours and in good weather.

Helpful Resources

Road Safety Overseas (Information from the US Department of State): Includes tips on driving in other countries, International Driving Permits, auto insurance, and other resources.

The Association for International Road Travel has country-specific Road Travel Reports available for most countries for a minimal fee.

Traffic flows on the left side of the road in Singapore.

  • Always pay close attention to the flow of traffic, especially when crossing the street.
  • LOOK RIGHT for approaching traffic.

Maintain personal security

Use the same common sense traveling overseas that you would at home, and always stay alert and aware of your surroundings.

Before you leave

  • Research your destination(s), including local laws, customs, and culture.
  • Monitor travel advisories and alerts and read travel tips from the US Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) .
  • Leave a copy of your itinerary, contact information, credit cards, and passport with someone at home.
  • Pack as light as possible, and leave at home any item you could not replace.

While at your destination(s)

  • Carry contact information for the nearest US embassy or consulate .
  • Carry a photocopy of your passport and entry stamp; leave the actual passport securely in your hotel.
  • Follow all local laws and social customs.
  • Do not wear expensive clothing or jewelry.
  • Always keep hotel doors locked, and store valuables in secure areas.
  • If possible, choose hotel rooms between the 2nd and 6th floors.

Healthy Travel Packing List

Use the Healthy Travel Packing List for Singapore for a list of health-related items to consider packing for your trip. Talk to your doctor about which items are most important for you.

Why does CDC recommend packing these health-related items?

It’s best to be prepared to prevent and treat common illnesses and injuries. Some supplies and medicines may be difficult to find at your destination, may have different names, or may have different ingredients than what you normally use.

If you are not feeling well after your trip, you may need to see a doctor. If you need help finding a travel medicine specialist, see Find a Clinic . Be sure to tell your doctor about your travel, including where you went and what you did on your trip. Also tell your doctor if you were bitten or scratched by an animal while traveling.

For more information on what to do if you are sick after your trip, see Getting Sick after Travel .

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singapore tourism vaccination requirements

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Stepping down of the Vaccinated Travel Framework

The Vaccinated Travel Framework (VTF) was launched in April 2022 to facilitate the safe resumption of international travel. Given the stable and improving global COVID-19 situation, and the low impact of imported cases on our healthcare capacity, the remaining COVID-19 border measures will be lifted.

From 13 February 2023,

  • All non-fully vaccinated travellers entering Singapore will no longer be required to show proof of a negative Pre-Departure Test.
  • Non-fully vaccinated Short Term Visitors will no longer be required to purchase COVID-19 travel insurance.

The VTF will remain in place for reactivation if there are international developments of concern, such as new severe variants or signs that our healthcare capacity is strained by imported cases.

Continued submission of health declaration and screening of infectious diseases

All travellers entering Singapore via air or sea (including Singapore residents), and Short-Term Visitors entering via land, are to continue submitting their health declaration via the SG Arrival Card e-service. They will also be screened for other infectious diseases of concern, such as Yellow Fever, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome and Ebola.

Travellers are advised to check the  ICA website  for the latest border measures before entering Singapore.

For more information, please refer to MOH’s  press release .

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COVID-19 General Advisory for Travellers

What to do if you are unwell or test positive for covid-19 while visiting singapore .

Should you feel unwell or tested positive for COVID-19 

Travellers who are unwell or tested positive for COVID-19 should receive medical advice if they fulfil any of the following criteria.

  • Aged 60 and older
  • Have Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) symptoms
  • Immunocompromised or have concurrent medical conditions such as obesity (e.g., adults with a BMI ≥30), hypertension, diabetes, chronic heart and lung diseases, kidney diseases on dialysis, hypercoagulable states, cancer, or patients on drugs that cause immunosuppression
  • Persons with Down’s syndrome

Persons with mild ARI symptoms should stay at home until symptoms resolve.

If there is a need to go out while symptomatic, or if asymptomatic but test positive for COVID-19, exercise social responsibility by observing the following practices. 

  • Minimise social interactions
  • Wear a mask
  • Avoid crowded places
  • Do not visit vulnerable places such as hospitals and nursing homes
  • Do not have contact with vulnerable persons such as the elderly

Refer to https://www.moh.gov.sg/licensing-and-regulation/telemedicine . Should you test positive on a COVID-19 PCR test, please note that you will be assigned a separate telemedicine provider for medical support while you are serving your Isolation, and should not reach out to the telemedicine providers on this list. 

Self-administered ART kits can be purchased online or from pharmacies and drugstores around Singapore. Hotels may also carry self-administered kits for purchase. If you test positive on an ART and are self-isolating, you should purchase your ART kits through contactless methods and should not leave your accommodation to do so.

By default, travellers should recover in hotels or residential accommodation unless they are 1) partially vaccinated or unvaccinated, aged 50 years and above 2) Vaccinated, aged 80 years and above 3) Children aged below 3 months and children aged 3 months to below 3 years, who have been assessed by a medical professional to be clinically unsuitable to recover at home or in a hotel. These travellers will be advised by MOH to be transferred to an appropriate care facility. Travellers may opt to recover at home if they own a residence in Singapore. Travellers may not check into another hotel for recovery, or change their isolation venues (e.g. transfer hotels) once they have begun isolating. They will only be released upon fulfilling the recovery conditions.

Health Risk Notices (HRN) are issued to persons identified as close contacts of a COVID-positive case, if declared a close contact by a COVID-positive case.

Singapore relaxes COVID travel curbs, mask rules further

First day free of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) restrictions in Singapore

  • Visitors will no longer need to buy COVID travel insurance
  • Travellers not fully vaccinated won't need to show test results
  • Masks will not have to be worn on public transport
  • Relaxed rules to come in from next week

Reporting by Chen Lin Editing by Ed Davies

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles. , opens new tab

singapore tourism vaccination requirements

Thomson Reuters

Chen Lin was a reporter with the Singapore bureau until 2023, covering macroeconomics and general news in Singapore.

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Travel Advisory July 24, 2023

Singapore - level 1: exercise normal precautions.

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed . 

Exercise normal precautions in Singapore.

Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to Singapore.

If you decide to travel to Singapore:

  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.   
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for Singapore. 
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  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .    

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

To enter Singapore, you need a passport that is valid for at least six months beyond the date of your intended stay. If you plan on regional travel beyond Singapore, make sure that your passport is valid for at least six months beyond the date you plan to enter other countries in the region. You do not need a visa for tourist or business visits up to 90 days.

Visit the  Embassy of Singapore  website for the most current visa information. 

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to Singapore. Foreign workers applying for an employment pass are required to undergo a medical screening for HIV/AIDS and a positive test will result in the rejection of a foreign worker’s application.

Find information on  dual nationality ,  prevention of international child abduction  and  customs regulations  on our websites.

COVID-19 Requirements: There are no COVID-related entry requirements for U.S. citizens.  

Safety and Security

Criminal Penalties:  You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.  Individuals establishing a business or practicing a profession that requires additional permits or licensing should seek information from the competent local authorities, prior to practicing or operating a business.  

In Singapore, you may be taken in for questioning if you don’t have your passport with you. Travelers should be aware of the following penalties for certain crimes in Singapore:

·         Possible arrest for jaywalking, littering, or spitting

·         Mandatory caning (a form of physical punishment) for certain vandalism offenses

·         Possible imprisonment, caning, or fines for immigration violations

·         Possible imprisonment, caning or fines for sex crimes or sexually inappropriate behavior. Lewd, unwanted behavior, including inappropriate comments, messages, or photography toward women who find it offensive may result in fines and imprisonment (“Insulting the modesty of woman”). If there is unwanted physical contact of any kind involved (“Outrage of modesty,” molestation), the laws are gender neutral and punishments generally more severe.

·         Severe penalties for drug-related charges, including the death penalty or caning.

·         Strict penalties for those who illegally possess or carry firearms, or who commit crimes with firearms

If you are suspected of consuming or possessing illegal drugs , police may:

·         Conduct unannounced drug tests and property searches, including upon entry into Singapore

·         Require you to provide a urine or blood sample on short notice

A positive finding or an unwillingness to participate can lead to:

·         Denial of entry into Singapore

·         Detention

·         Confiscation of your passport while under investigation

Singaporean authorities may arrest and convict any permanent residents of Singapore even if they have consumed illegal drugs outside of Singapore.

Singapore does not recognize dual nationality beyond the age of 22, and it strictly enforces universal national service for all male citizens and permanent residents. To determine if you have a national service obligation, contact the  Ministry of Defense.

Drunk and disorderly conduct can lead to a SG$1,000 fine or imprisonment. It is illegal to drink alcohol in a public place between 10:30 pm and 7:00 am. The areas of Geylang and Little India are designated as “Liquor Control Zones” where drinking in public places is prohibited all weekend, on public holidays, and on the eve of public holidays.

Public Demonstrations:  Public demonstrations are legal only at Speakers’ Corner in Hong Lim Park. Most outdoor public assemblies require a police permit. Singapore forbids foreign nationals who do not have permanent resident status from participating in or observing permitted public demonstrations, assemblies, and processions at Speakers’ Corner. Penalties may be severe, including large fines and/or imprisonment.

Some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on  crimes against minors abroad  and the  Department of Justice  website.

Arrest Notification:  If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our  webpage  for further information.

Faith-Based Travelers:  The Singapore Convention of Jehovah’s Witness and the Unification Church are banned by the Singapore government. All written materials published by the International Bible Students Association and the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society, publishing arms of the Jehovah’s Witnesses, remain banned. Possible penalties include fines and imprisonment.

See our following webpages for additional details on faith-based traveling:

  • Faith-Based Travel Information

International Religious Freedom Report – see country reports

  • Human Rights Report  – see country reports
  • Hajj Fact Sheet for Travelers
  • Best Practices for Volunteering Abroad

LGBTI Travelers:  Singapore does not recognize same-sex unions. The Penal Code criminalizes any “act of gross indecency” between two men and prescribes a sentence not exceeding two years for those found guilty under this law. The Singaporean government has stated that it will not enforce this section of the Penal Code but it remains on the statute books. The government restricts foreigners from involvement in public events that champion LGBTI issues. LGBTI individuals may have difficulty gaining employment in certain sectors of the civil service. The  Ministry of Manpower  does not issue dependent passes (work permits) to partners in lesbian and gay relationships, even if legally married in another country.

See our  LGBTI Travel Information  page and section 6 of our  Human Rights report  for further details.

Travelers with Disabilities: The law in Singapore does not explicitly prohibit discrimination against persons with disabilities. Social acceptance of persons with disabilities in public is as prevalent as in the United States. The most common types of accessibility include accessible facilities, information, and access to services. Expect accessibility to be common in public transportation, lodging, communication/information, and general infrastructure.

Students:  See our  Students Abroad  page and  FBI travel tips .

Women Travelers:  See our travel tips for  Women Travelers .

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties:  You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, imprisoned, or even caned. 

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on  crimes against minors abroad  and the  Department of Justice  website.

  • Possible arrest for jaywalking, littering, or spitting
  • Mandatory caning (a form of corporal punishment) for certain vandalism offenses
  • Possible imprisonment, caning, or fines for immigration violations
  • Possible imprisonment, caning or fines for sex crimes or sexually inappropriate behavior. Lewd, unwanted behavior, including inappropriate comments, messages, or photography toward women who find it offensive may result in fines and imprisonment (“Insulting the modesty of woman”). If there is unwanted physical contact of any kind involved (“Outrage of modesty”, molestation), the laws are gender neutral and punishments generally more severe.
  • Severe penalties for drug-related charges, including the death penalty or caning.
  • Strict penalties for those who illegally possess or carry firearms, or who commit crimes with firearms

Singaporean authorities may conduct unannounced drug tests and property searches, including upon entry into the country, on foreign citizens who are suspected of consuming or possessing illegal drugs. Police may require you to provide a urine or blood sample on short notice. A positive finding or an unwillingness to participate can lead to a denial of entry into Singapore, detention and/or confiscation of your passport while under an investigation. Singaporean authorities may arrest and convict any permanent residents of Singapore even if they have consumed illegal drugs outside of Singapore.

Singapore does not recognize dual nationality beyond the age of 22, and it strictly enforces universal national service for all male citizens and permanent residents. To determine if you will have a national service obligation, you should contact the Ministry of Defense .

Drunk and disorderly conduct is treated seriously, and can lead to a fine or imprisonment. As of April 1, 2015, it is illegal to drink alcohol in a public place between 10:30 pm and 7:00 am. The areas of Geylang and Little India are designated as “Liquor Control Zones” where drinking in public places is prohibited all weekend, on public holidays, and on the eve of public holidays. Under the Liquor Control Act, you could be fined up to SG$1,000 for consuming alcohol in a public place during prohibited hours.

Public Demonstrations:  Public demonstrations are legal only at Speakers’ Corner in Hong Lim Park and most outdoor public assemblies require a police permit. Singapore amended its laws in April 2017 to forbid foreign nationals who are not permanent residents from observing permitted public demonstrations, assemblies, and processions at Speakers’ Corner. The law does not distinguish between participants and observers, so anyone at Speakers’ Corner could be considered part of an event. Penalties may be severe, including large fines and/or imprisonment.

Faith-Based Travelers:  The Singapore Convention of Jehovah’s Witness and the Unification Church continue to be banned by the Singapore government. All written materials published by the International Bible Students Association and the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society, publishing arms of the Jehovah’s Witnesses, remained banned by the government.

See our following webpages for additional Faith-based traveling details:

  • International Religious Freedom Report  – see country reports

LGBTI Travelers:  Singapore does not recognize same-sex unions. The Penal Code criminalizes any “act of gross indecency” between two men and prescribes a sentence not exceeding two years for those found guilty under this law. The Singaporean government has stated that it will not enforce this section of the Penal Code but it remains on the statute books. The government issues permits for open air events that openly champion LGBTI issues on a limited basis but new regulations restrict foreign involvement. LGBTI individuals may have difficulty gaining employment in certain sectors of the civil service. The  Ministry of Manpower  does not issue dependent passes (work permits) to partners in lesbian and gay relationships, even if legally married in another country.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Singapore has established a comprehensive code of standards for barrier-free accessibility, including facilities for persons with physical disabilities, in all new buildings and has mandated the progressive upgrading of older structures. The  Ministry of Social and Family Development (MSF) is responsible for protecting the rights of persons with disabilities and implementing programs and services in the disability sector.

Students:  See our  Students Abroad  page and  FBI travel tips .

Good medical care is widely available in Singapore. Doctors and hospitals:

  • expect immediate, up-front payment for health services by credit card or cash
  • generally do not accept U.S. health insurance
  • may require a substantial deposit before admitting you for any major medical treatment.

In certain circumstances, the Ministry of Health may access patient medical records without the consent of the patient, and in certain circumstances physicians may be required to report information relating to the diagnosis or treatment without the patient's consent.

Employment pass holders are subject to medical exams and may be denied or deported on medical grounds, including for HIV infection.

For emergency services in Singapore, dial 955.

Ambulance services are widely available. We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. Most hospitals and doctors overseas do not accept U.S. health insurance.

Medical Insurance:  Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.

Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for more information on type of insurance you should consider before you travel overseas. We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription. Check with Singapore’s Health Sciences Authority to ensure the medication is legal in Singapore.

Vaccinations:  Be up-to-date on all  vaccinations  recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

  • World Health Organization
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  (CDC)

Air Quality: Visit AirNow Department of State for information on air quality at U.S. Embassies and Consulates.

The U.S. Embassy maintains a list of doctors and hospitals . We do not endorse or recommend any specific medical provider or clinic.

Health facilities in general:

  • Adequate health facilities are available throughout the country.
  • Hospitals and doctors may require payment “up front” prior to service or admission.
  • Private hospitals usually require advance payment or proof of adequate insurance before admitting a patient.

Medical Tourism and Elective Surgery:

  • Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for information on Medical Tourism, the risks of medical tourism, and what you can do to prepare before traveling to Singapore.
  • We strongly recommend supplemental insurance  to cover medical evacuation in the event of unforeseen medical complications.

Pharmaceuticals:

  • Exercise caution when purchasing medication overseas. Pharmaceuticals, both over the counter and requiring prescription in the United States, are often readily available for purchase with little controls. Counterfeit medication is common and may prove to be ineffective, the wrong strength, or contain dangerous ingredients. Medication should be purchased in consultation with a medical professional and from reputable establishments.
  • U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the Food and Drug Administration are responsible for rules governing the transport of medication back to the United States. Medication purchased abroad must meet their requirements to be legally brought back into the United States. Medication should be for personal use and must be approved for usage in the United States. Please visit the U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the Food and Drug Administration websites for more information.

Assisted Reproductive Technology and Surrogacy:

  • If you are considering traveling to Singapore to have a child through use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) or surrogacy, please see our ART and Surrogacy Abroad page .
  • Surrogacy is illegal for foreigners in Singapore, subject to complex local regulation. For additional information, visit the Government of Singapore’s website for information on foreigner surrogacy.

Adventure Travel:

  • Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information about Adventure Travel .

General Health:

The following diseases are prevalent:

  • Chikungunya

Use the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended mosquito repellents and sleep under insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets. Chemoprophylaxis is recommended for all travelers even for short stays.

Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information about Resources for Travelers regarding specific issues in Singapore.

Mosquito-borne diseases: Dengue is active in Singapore and can be monitored at the  Singapore National Environmental Agency . In addition, most neighboring countries are Zika endemic.

Haze: Air pollution from forest fires in neighboring countries occurs intermittently, usually between July and October. Singapore’s National Environmental Agency’s  Haze  provides public updates on conditions.

Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety:  Singapore has a highly developed, well-maintained road and highway network. Be aware of motorcyclists, who often ignore lane markings.

The  Automobile Association (AA) of Singapore  provides roadside assistance, and the  Land Transport Authority  has rescue vehicles on the road at all hours. In addition, closed circuit cameras monitor all major roads.

Traffic Laws:  Driving is done on the left-hand side of the road. Laws involving traffic rules, vehicle registration, and liability in case of accident are strictly enforced and violations may result in criminal penalties.

Public Transportation:  Public transportation and taxis are abundant, inexpensive, and reliable. Bus stops and trains have panels indicating all routes and stops.

See our  Road Safety page  for more information. Visit the website of Singapore’s  national tourist office  and  national authority responsible for road safety .

Aviation Safety Oversight:  The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Singapore’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Singapore’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the  FAA safety assessment page .

Maritime Travel:  Mariners planning travel to Singapore should check for  U.S. maritime advisories and alerts . Information may also be posted via to the  U.S. Coast Guard homeport website  and the  NGA broadcast warnings .

Review information about International Parental Child Abduction in Singapore . For additional IPCA-related information, please see the International Child Abduction Prevention and Return Act ( ICAPRA ) report.

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Singapore Just Relaxed Its COVID-19 Entry Protocol — What to Know

The country previously required non-vaccinated travelers to complete a COVID test 48 hours ahead of departure.

Soo Hau Jun/Getty Images

As the world continues to reopen to travelers, Singapore is taking a major step in reducing travel requirements for entry into the country. 

In a recent announcement from Singapore’s Ministry of Health, the government has said they will be lifting COVID precautions including pre-departure testing, and mask mandates on public transport as of this past Monday.

For Americans traveling to Singapore, the government provides explicit guidance that “there are no longer any COVID-19 measures for travelers arriving in Singapore from 13 Feb 2023, regardless of vaccination status or traveller profile. Travelers must ensure that they fulfill all other general entry requirements “. 

Singapore previously required non-vaccinated travelers to complete a COVID test 48 hours ahead of departure.

The Singapore Ministry of Health cited the fact that new COVID-19 cases have been in decline, and new variants have not emerged as concerning.     This is one of the biggest steps for Singapore to make in reduction of COVID-19 protocols, since last August when the government removed the quarantine mandate regardless of vaccination status.

Singapore Tourism expects between 12 to 14 million visitors in 2023, which is nearly double the 6.3 million visitors who traveled to Singapore in 2022. Over the last year, Singapore Tourism has partnered with National Geographic , Warner Brothers Discovery , and  GRAMMY-nominated singer, songwriter and producer Charlie Puth on programming to increase tourism to the country. 

  • Ministry of Health

COVID-19 Vaccination

Related content.

  • Child Vaccination

Why is vaccination important?

What are the vaccines available under the national vaccination programme.

  • Pfizer-BioNTech/Comirnaty
  • Moderna/Spikevax
  • Sinovac-CoronaVac

Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna have successfully obtained full registration. Sinovac-CoronaVac vaccine continues to be included under the National Vaccination Programme (NVP)* until 30 September 2024. If there is no application for Sinovac-CoronaVac vaccine to be fully registered, NVP will lapse for Sinovac-CoronaVac vaccine by 30 September 2024. Nevertheless, Sinovac-CoronaVac vaccine will continue to be available at private clinics which have applied to use it under the Special Access Route (SAR). The Novavax/Nuvaxovid vaccine is currently unavailable under the NVP as the Novavax/Nuvaxovid original vaccine is no longer supplied by the manufacturer. Novavax is in the process of filing for regulatory approval for its updated COVID-19 XBB.1.5 vaccine formulation.  *Under the National Vaccination Programme, vaccination is free for all Singaporean Citizens, Permanent Resident, Long Term Pass Holders and certain Short Term Pass holders.

What should I do to be vaccinated against COVID-19?

  • Two doses of Moderna/Spikevax, given eight weeks apart, OR
  • Three doses of Pfizer-BioNTech/Comirnaty, given eight weeks apart

Persons who are aged 5 years and above should adhere to the following vaccination recommendations:

Locations for vaccination

All persons eligible for COVID-19 vaccination may walk in to any of the Joint Testing and Vaccination Centres (JTVCs)  or polyclinics. Alternatively, you may book an appointment at a JTVC or Public Health Preparedness Clinic (PHPC) using this link. Mobile Vaccination Teams (MVTs) have been deployed to selected heartland locations to make it even more convenient for our seniors to get vaccinated and boosted. The MVTs will be deployed at selected Residents’ Committee Centres at residential blocks and Community Centres. Each MVT will be deployed at a given site for a few days before moving on to the next location.

Vaccine

Expand All | Collapse All

Frequently Asked Questions

For more trending FAQs, please use this link .

On vaccine effectiveness

  • CDC COVID-19 Study: mRNA Vaccines Reduce Risk of Infection by 91%  [US CDC]
  • COVID-19: Effectiveness and benefits of vaccination  [Canada Government]
  • COVID-19: Vaccine effectiveness and protection  [NZ Ministry of Health]
  • How COVID-19 vaccines work  [Australia Department of Health]
  • How well do the COVID-19 vaccines work?  [UK NHS]
  • How do Vaccines work?  [WHO]
  • How are Vaccines Developed?  [WHO]
  • Manufacturing, Safety and Quality Control of Vaccines  [WHO]
  • How COVID-19 death rates differ by vaccination status  [OWID]

On vaccinations for pregnant women

  • COVID-19 vaccination: a guide on pregnancy and breastfeeding  [GOV.UK]
  • COVID-19 vaccination – Pregnancy and breastfeeding  [Australia Department of Health]
  • COVID-19 vaccine: Pregnancy and breastfeeding  [NZ Ministry of Health]
  • COVID-19 Vaccines While Pregnant or Breastfeeding  [US CDC]
  • Vaccination and pregnancy: COVID-19  [Canada Government]

On booster doses

  • Boosters give >90% protection against symptomatic COVID in adults over 50  [GOV.UK]
  • CDC Statement on ACIP Booster Recommendations  [US CDC]
  • COVID-19 booster vaccine advice  [Australia Department of Health]
  • COVID-19: Vaccine boosters  [NZ Ministry of Health]
  • Canada authorizes use of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine as booster shot  [Health Canada]
  • Effectiveness of a 3rd Dose of mRNA vaccines against COVID-19  [US CDC][

On vaccinations for children

  • CDC Recommends Pediatric COVID-19 Vaccine for Children 5 to 11 Years  [US CDC]
  • COVID Vaccine: What Parents Need to Know  [John Hopkins Medicine]
  • Should You Vaccinate Your Kids?  [Tomas Pueyo]
  • Vaccines for children: COVID-19  [Canada Government]

On myths & falsehoods about COVID-19 vaccines

  • Get the facts about COVID-19 vaccination  [NZ Government]
  • Is it true? Get the facts on COVID-19 vaccines  [Australia Department of Health]
  • Myths and Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines  [US CDC]
  • Mythbusters  [WHO]

Passport Health logo

Travel Vaccines and Advice for Singapore

Passport Health offers a variety of options for travellers throughout the world.

Singapore is an increasingly popular tourist destination in Asia.

The country is a paradise for food-savvy travellers, combining Chinese, Malay and Indian influences. Visitors may also want to stop by Chinatown or Little India to see cultural integration at work.

Singapore boasts many impressive temples, parks and museums. Visitors may want to head over to Night Safari , where wild species can be seen in a whole new (lack of) light.

Singapore has lots to offer visitors with a wide variety of interests.

Do I Need Vaccines for Singapore?

Yes, some vaccines are recommended or required for Singapore. The PHAC and WHO recommend the following vaccinations for Singapore: COVID-19 , hepatitis A , hepatitis B , typhoid , yellow fever , Japanese encephalitis , rabies , meningitis , polio , measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) , Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis) , chickenpox , shingles , pneumonia and influenza .

See the bullets below to learn more about some of these key immunizations:

  • COVID-19 – Airborne – Recommended for all travellers
  • Hepatitis A – Food & Water – Recommended for most travellers
  • Hepatitis B – Blood & Body Fluids – Recommended for travellers to most regions.
  • Typhoid – Food & Water – Recommended for travellers to most regions.
  • Yellow Fever – Mosquito – Required if travelling from a country with risk of yellow fever transmission.
  • Japanese Encephalitis – Mosquito – Recommended depending on itinerary and activities. May be given to short- and extended-stay travellers, recurrent travellers and travel to rural areas. Risk is throughout region, year-round.
  • Rabies – Saliva of Infected Animals – Vaccine recommended for long-term travellers and those who may come in contact with animals.
  • Measles Mumps Rubella (MMR) – Various Vectors – Given to anyone unvaccinated and/or born after 1957. One time adult booster recommended.
  • TDAP (Tetanus, Diphtheria & Pertussis) – Wounds & Airborne – Only one adult booster of pertussis required.
  • Chickenpox – Direct Contact & Airborne – Given to those unvaccinated that did not have chickenpox.
  • Shingles – Direct Contact – Vaccine can still be given if you have had shingles.
  • Pneumonia – Airborne – Two vaccines given separately. All 65+ or immunocompromised should receive both.
  • Influenza – Airborne – Vaccine components change annually.
  • Meningitis – Airborne & Direct Contact – Given to anyone unvaccinated or at an increased risk, especially students.
  • Polio – Food & Water – Considered a routine vaccination for most travel itineraries. Single adult booster recommended.

See the tables below for more information:

Dengue and chikungunya are present in Singapore and pose a threat to travellers in the region. Be sure to use mosquito repellents and netting while in-country.

See our vaccinations page to learn more about these infections and vaccines. Ready to protect yourself? Book your travel health appointment today by calling or schedule online now .

Do I Need a Visa or Passport for Singapore?

If you are on a business or tourist visits to Singapore for less than 30 days, then a Visa is not required. Any stay longer than a 30-day period will require a visa. All visa applications have a service fee and will take 10 to 20 business days to be processed. In order to receive a visa, you must visit the Consulate-General in Toronto or online. Your passport must have at least 6-months validity in order to obtain a visa.

Sources: Embassy of Singapore and Canadian Travel and Tourism

Visit the Canadian Travel and Tourism website for more information on entry and exit requirements.

What is the Climate Like in Singapore?

Singapore’s climate is tropical, with lots of rainfall and humidity. Temperature is consistent, with averages around the mid-20’s throughout the year. Singapore is generally hottest in April and May and coolest in December and January.

Due to its near to the equator, Singapore does not have delineated wet and dry seasons. The country experiences two monsoon seasons, the northeast monsoon season from around December to March has more frequent rains. The southwest monsoon season, brings drier months from around May to September.

Travellers should be prepared for rain and humidity. Thunderstorms are frequent. Drink plenty of water and cool off indoors.

How Safe is Singapore?

Singapore is generally considered safe for travellers, and the crime rate is low. Travellers should keep track of their personal belongings, especially while travelling in crowded places or by public transportation.

Be aware of the presence of extremist groups in Southeast Asia that have attacked neighboring countries. In general, areas frequented by Westerners and Canadians may be at a higher risk for terrorist attacks.

Singapore’s Rules

Singapore has some harsh penalties for items that many may view as fairly mundane. This includes:

  • Arrests for jaywalking, littering or spitting
  • Caning for graffiti or other kinds of vandalism
  • Imprisonment, caning or fine for immigration violations

Sexually inappropriate behavior, lewd remarks and violations of modesty can also be harshly punished.

Drunk and disorderly conduct is punishable by fine or prison time. In many areas it is illegal to consume alcohol between 10:30 pm and 7:00 am in public places.

Singapore does not recognize same-sex unions, and LGBT travellers may face challenges or discrimination. The Penal Code criminalizes “acts of gross indecency” between two men, though the government has said it will not enforce this statute.

Travellers without their passports may be taken in for questioning.

What Should I Pack for Singapore?

Here are some essential items to consider for your trip to Singapore:

  • Insect repellent and sunscreen.
  • An umbrella and rain jacket, waterproof clothing and shoes
  • Light, breathable clothing
  • Travel documents like passport and visa

Canadian Embassy in Singapore

Canadian consular services can help travellers with many issues they may face including passport services. Once in Singapore, the information for the Canadian Embassy is:

Canadian Embassy Singapore One George Street, #11-01 Singapore 049145 Tel.: 65 6854-5900

Ready to start your next journey? Call us at or book online now !

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On This Page: Do I Need Vaccines for Singapore? Do I Need a Visa or Passport for Singapore? What is the Climate Like in Singapore? How Safe is Singapore? Singapore’s Rules What Should I Pack To Singapore? Canadian Embassy in Singapore

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Exercise normal safety precautions  in Singapore.

  • Unauthorised public demonstrations are illegal. You need a police permit for any public gatherings, even if you're the only one demonstrating or protesting. Public demonstrations are only allowed at Speakers Corner in Hong Lim Park. If you're not a permanent resident, you need a police permit to join these.
  • Violent crime against tourists is rare. Petty crime, such as theft and pickpocketing, happens at the airport, in tourist areas and on public transport. Safeguard your belongings.
  • Scammers call or send text messages and pretend to be local government officials, banks or telcos. They try to obtain your personal information. Hang up immediately if the caller cannot identify themselves correctly. Delete texts quickly. Verify first by going to official websites or calling the company's hotline.
  • Scammers pretend to be landlords on property websites and offer fake rental properties. Research the property and landlord before agreeing to a property rental or sale contract.
  • Terrorism is a possible threat. Perpetrators may be self-radicalised individuals. Potential targets include businesses and public areas popular with foreigners. Take official warnings seriously.
  • Strong winds and heavy rain happen during the monsoon seasons from December to March and June to September. Follow the advice of local officials.

Full travel advice:  Safety

  • The standard of medical facilities and care is similar to or higher than in Australia. The cost is much higher. Ensure your travel insurance covers medical costs.
  • Dengue fever is endemic in Singapore. The number of reported cases remains high. Follow the  National Environment Agency  advice to mitigate the risk of transmission.
  • Zika virus is a risk. If you're pregnant, discuss your travel plans with your doctor. Other insect-borne diseases include chikungunya and Japanese encephalitis. Ensure your accommodation is insect-proof. Use insect repellent. Get vaccinated against Japanese encephalitis before you travel.
  • Smoke haze may occur from June to October. The  National Environment Agency  gives updates and health warnings.

Full travel advice:  Health

  • Don't use or carry illegal drugs. It's illegal to have drugs in your system. You can be charged for consuming drugs even if you took them outside Singapore. Penalties include caning and the death sentence for serious drug offences.
  • Singapore has strict laws for 'outrage of modesty' offences or being drunk and disorderly in public. You should avoid any action that could be interpreted as molestation, including inappropriate touching or language. Penalties include jail, fines and caning.
  • Singapore has strict laws and penalties for acts that are legal or minor offences in Australia. These include smoking in public places or restaurants, spitting, importing or chewing gum, chewing tobacco, littering and jaywalking.
  • Strict laws control alcohol, e-cigarettes and vaporisers. It's illegal to drink in public between 10:30pm and 7am or in Liquor Control Zones. Importing vaporisers, including for your own use, is also illegal.
  • Be careful when taking photos. It's illegal to photograph official buildings where there are signs banning photos.
  • Penalties are severe for crimes that affect social, racial or ethnic harmony. These include racial insults and promoting ill will and hostility between different races or classes. Apply for a Miscellaneous Work Pass from the Ministry of Manpower if you want to speak publicly on racial, communal, religious or political topics.

Same-sex acts are no longer illegal. You should be aware there are local sensitivities, and behaviour standards are conservative. Public displays of affection may offend.

Full travel advice:  Local laws

  • Do not bring medicinal cannabis to Singapore, even during transit. If you take prescribed medicinal cannabis, you should contact the Singapore Health Science Authority to review your situation.
  • Foreign short-term visitors holding passports or travel documents issued by a  visa-required country  must apply for an entry visa.
  • You must complete a  Singapore Arrival Card (SGAC)  before arriving in Singapore. There is no charge for this. You may need to present your SGAC acknowledgment email with supporting documentation to the airlines at check-in.

Full travel advice:  Travel

Local contacts

  • The  Consular Services Charter  details what we can and can't do to help you overseas.
  • For consular help, contact the  Australian High Commission in Singapore .

Full travel advice:  Local contacts

Full advice

Civil unrest and political tension.

Demonstrations and protests

Unauthorised public demonstrations are illegal.

You need a police permit for:

  • a public gathering to which the public has been invited, even if you are the only one demonstrating or protesting
  • a public procession of 2 or more people to which the public has been invited

Public demonstrations are only allowed at Speakers Corner in Hong Lim Park. Non-permanent residents need a permit to join any activities at Speakers Corner. Penalties can be severe.

More information:

  • Singapore Police Force
  • Demonstrations and civil unrest

Violent crime against tourists is rare.

Pickpocketing and street theft happens at the airport, tourist destinations, hotels and on public transport.

Watch your belongings, especially in tourist areas and on public transport.

Scams and fraud

Impersonation scams happen.

Scammers are using automated voice calls or text messages or impersonating local government officials (e.g. from the Ministry of Health (MOH) or Immigration & Checkpoints Authority), bank or telco staff. Calls ask for personal details and often use scare tactics (such as claiming you have committed an offence or have account issues). You should hang up immediately if the caller cannot identify themselves correctly. Always verify the information or request through official websites or call the company/department hotline before offering any personal information. Delete text messages quickly. 

Property rental  scams  happen.

Con artists pretend to be landlords on property websites and offer fake rental properties.

Get details of a rental property, including the owner, from the following:

  • Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore
  • Singapore Land Authority

To protect yourself from property scams:

  • research the property and landlord before agreeing to a property rental or purchase contract
  • don't make large payments in cash
  • only use accredited property agents
  • make sure landlords and agents are present when you sign tenancy documents

Be wary of dishonest retailers of mobile phones, electrical goods and cameras.

If you're affected, lodge a complaint through the  Scam Alert website . 

If you live in Singapore, go to the  Consumers Association of Singapore .

Cyber security

You may be at risk of cyber-based threats during overseas travel to any country. Digital identity theft is a growing concern. Your devices and personal data can be compromised, especially if you’re connecting to Wi-Fi, using or connecting to shared or public computers, or to Bluetooth.

Social media can also be risky in destinations where there are social or political tensions, or laws that may seem unreasonable by Australian standards. Travellers have been arrested for things they have said on social media. Don't comment on local or political events on your social media.

More information: 

  • Cyber security when travelling overseas

Terrorist attacks could happen in Singapore. Attacks could be random and may affect places that Westerners frequent. 

Singapore has enhanced security measures, including:

  • strong border controls
  • security and police surveillance
  • restrictions on access to some public venues

Ministers have issued public warnings about the seriousness of the terrorist threat.

The Singapore government has developed the  SG Secure app to help prevent terrorist incidents and alert people to security or other threats. 

Possible terrorist targets include businesses and public areas popular with travellers. 

These include:

  • hotels, clubs, restaurants and bars
  • places of worship
  • outdoor events and markets
  • tourist areas
  • transport hubs, such as train stations
  • places associated with the Singapore Government

To stay safe:

  • be alert to possible threats, especially in public places
  • report any suspicious activity or items to police
  • monitor the media for new threats
  • follow the advice of local authorities

If there's an attack, leave the area as soon as it's safe. Avoid the affected area in case of secondary attacks.

Terrorism is a threat worldwide.

  • Terrorist threats

Climate and natural disasters

Singapore experiences  natural disasters  and  severe weather , including:

  • severe rainstorms
  • earthquakes

The monsoon seasons are from December to March and June to September. Strong winds and heavy rain happen.

If there's a natural disaster:

  • secure your passport in a safe, waterproof location
  • keep in contact with your friends and family
  • monitor local media, weather reports and the  Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System
  • check with tour operators before travelling to affected areas

Earthquakes in other countries in the region can affect Singapore.

Singapore is a major flight hub. Natural disasters in other parts of the world may affect flights. These include volcanic ash plumes.

Contact your airline or travel agent for flight updates.

Travel insurance

Get comprehensive  travel insurance  before you leave. 

Your policy needs to cover all overseas medical costs, including medical evacuation. The Australian Government won't pay for these costs.

If you can't afford travel insurance, you can't afford to travel. This applies to everyone, no matter how healthy and fit you are. 

Medical care is expensive. If you're not insured, you may find yourself paying thousands of dollars for medical treatment. 

  • what activities and care your policy covers
  • that your insurance covers you for the whole time you'll be away.

Physical and mental health

Consider your physical and mental health before you travel, especially if you have an existing medical condition. 

See your doctor or travel clinic to:

  • have a basic health check-up
  • ask if your travel plans may affect your health
  • plan any vaccinations you need.

Do this at least 8 weeks before you leave. 

If you have immediate concerns for your welfare or the welfare of someone you know, call the 24-hour Consular Emergency Centre on +61 2 6261 3305 or contact your  nearest Australian Embassy, High Commission or Consulate  to discuss counselling hotlines and services available in your location.

  • General health advice
  • Healthy holiday tips  (Healthdirect Australia)

Medications

Not all medication available over the counter or by prescription in Australia is available in other countries. Some may even be considered illegal or a controlled substance, even if prescribed by an Australian doctor.

If you plan to bring medication, check if it's legal in Singapore. Take enough legal medicine for your trip.

Strict rules control substances in personal medication. Check the  Singapore Health Sciences Authority  for a list of controlled substances. It also explains how to apply for approval at least 10 working days before you arrive.

You don't need pre-approval if you don't leave the airport transit zone. Be aware that prohibited substances, such as chewing gum, cannabis and products containing cannabis extracts, are not allowed to be brought with you, even if you are staying in the airport transit zone.

Carry a copy of your prescription or a letter from your doctor stating:

  • what the medication is
  • your required dosage
  • that it's for personal use

Do not bring medicinal cannabis to Singapore, even during transit. If you take prescribed medicinal cannabis, you should contact the Singapore Health Science Authority to review your situation. 

  • Regulations for bringing personal medications into Singapore

Health risks

Insect-borne diseases.

There is some spread of  Zika  virus. There's no vaccination for it.

If you're pregnant:

  • discuss any travel plans with your doctor
  • consider deferring non-essential travel to affected areas

Outbreaks of other insect-borne illnesses can happen. These include:

  • chikungunya
  • Japanese encephalitis

Risk of insect-borne illnesses increases during the wetter months. This is from December to March and from June to September. Follow the  National Environment Agency's  advice for preventing and identifying dengue infection. Dengue fever is endemic in Singapore. The number of reported cases remains high.

Areas are regularly 'fogged' to stop the spread of insect-borne illnesses. The 'fog' includes toxic chemicals. Don't travel to areas straight after fogging.

To protect yourself against illness:

  • make sure your accommodation is insect-proof
  • use insect repellent
  • wear long, loose, light-coloured clothing
  • get vaccinated against Japanese encephalitis before you travel
  • Infectious diseases

Other health risks

Smoke haze happens from June to October.

Check for haze and any health warnings the Singapore Government issues. Get medical advice if needed.

Singapore's  National Environment Agency  gives updates when smoke haze happens. It also has information about public health issues.

Medical care

Medical facilities.

The standard of medical facilities and care is similar to or higher than Australia.

The cost of medical services is much higher.

Many places will want up-front payment or confirmed payment from your insurer before they provide treatment.

You're subject to all local laws and penalties, including those that may appear harsh by Australian standards. Research local laws before travelling.

If you're arrested or jailed, the Australian Government will do what it can to help you under our  Consular Services Charter . But we can't get you out of trouble or out of jail. 

If you're arrested, authorities may detain you while police investigate. You may be detained for up to 48 hours. During this period, you won't be allowed to speak with anyone, not even a lawyer. 

Police confiscate your passport if you're under investigation. There is no set timeline for investigations and can take several months. You won't be allowed to leave Singapore. You can't get a replacement passport until legal matters are settled. You must be able to support yourself financially during this time.

Drugs are illegal in Singapore. The penalties for use and possession are severe, including the death penalty. It's illegal to have drugs in your system. This includes traces being found in blood and urine tests.

While some destinations may have legalised drug use, you can be charged for consuming drugs even if you took them outside Singapore.

Severe penalties for drug offences include the death sentence and caning.

  • Carrying or using drugs

Serious crimes

Serious crimes, such as murder, abduction and weapons offences, can attract the death penalty.

Corporal punishment includes caning. This is a penalty for crimes including:

  • outrage of modesty
  • visa offences

Singapore has strict laws for 'outrage of modesty' cases. You should avoid any action that could be interpreted as molestation. This includes:

  • inappropriate touching or grabbing (whether drunk or not)
  • inappropriate language

Penalties include jail, fines, and caning.

Drunk and disorderly conduct in public is an offence.

You could be arrested for:

  • being found drunk in public
  • fighting and becoming a nuisance in public
  • resisting arrest, assaulting, or hurting a public servant (this includes police and taxi drivers)
  • drinking beyond the prescribed hours and in the allowed areas.

Minor crimes

Singapore has strict laws and penalties for things that are legal or are minor offences in Australia.

  • smoking in public places or indoor restaurants
  • importing or chewing gum
  • chewing tobacco

Racial crimes

Penalties are severe for crimes that affect social, racial or ethnic harmony. These include racial insults and promoting ill-will and hostility between different races or classes.

If you want to speak publicly on racial, communal, religious or political topics, you must apply for a Miscellaneous Work Pass from the  Ministry of Manpower .

Alcohol and vaporiser laws

Serious penalties, including detention or jail, apply for these illegal activities: 

  • being drunk, behaving badly or using offensive language during a flight
  • importing vaporisers, such as e-cigarettes, e-pipes, e-cigars, and refills into Singapore, including for your own use
  • driving under the influence of alcohol
  • drinking alcohol in public places between 10:30pm and 7am
  • drinking alcohol in a Liquor Control Zone

Liquor control zones include specified areas in Geylang and Little India. Additional restrictions apply on weekends and public holidays.

Copyrighted and prohibited material

Material that is legal in Australia may be illegal in Singapore. Serious penalties apply, including detention or jail, for bringing:

  • pirated copyright material
  • printed and recorded material considered obscene or prohibited

Serious penalties, including detention or imprisonment, apply for these illegal activities:

  • illegal immigration
  • overstaying your visa
  • shoplifting and theft
  • being caught with weapons, military souvenirs, replica weapons or ammunition, including empty cartridges
  • working without a valid work pass — (see ' Travel ')
  • taking photos of official buildings where there are signs banning photos

If you're  working in Singapore , your work pass may be cancelled if you break the law.

  • Ministry of Home Affairs  
  • Singapore Customs

Australian laws

Some Australian criminal laws still apply when you're overseas. If you break these laws, you may face prosecution in Australia.

  • Staying within the law

Local customs

Behaviour standards are conservative.

Public displays of affection may offend.

Take care not to offend. If in doubt, seek local advice.

  • Dual nationals

Singapore doesn't recognise dual nationality for people aged over 21 years.

Male citizens and permanent residents between the ages of 16 and 50 must do 2 years of national service. They must also do further training after completing national service.

If you're a dual citizen or want permanent residency, know the national service requirements before deciding to travel to, transit or live in Singapore. Failure to complete national service may result in penalties, including custodial sentences.

  • Singapore Ministry of Defence
  • Immigration and Checkpoints Authority
  • Email Singapore's Central Manpower Base:  [email protected]

Visas and border measures

Every country or territory decides who can enter or leave through its borders. For specific information about the evidence you'll need to enter a foreign destination, check with the nearest embassy, consulate or immigration department of the destination you're entering. 

Foreign short-term visitors holding passports or travel documents issued by a visa-required country must apply for an entry visa.

For work or study, you'll need to apply for a visa before you travel. Check work visa information with the  Ministry of Manpower .

Entry and exit conditions can change at short notice. Contact the nearest  embassy or consulate of Singapore  for details about visas, currency, customs and quarantine rules.

At immigration, you may have to show:

  • a passport with at least 6 months validity
  • evidence of enough funds for your intended stay
  • a confirmed onward or return flight ticket
  • a valid visa to enter your next destination
  • a yellow fever vaccination certificate, if needed

Border measures

On arrival in Singapore, you'll need to show:

  • your completed  Singapore Arrival Card (SGAC)  (there is no charge for the SGAC). There are scam websites that ask for payment. Make sure you use the official ICA website).

More information is available on the  ICA | Entering, Transiting and Departing website .

Transit through Singapore

Singapore is open to all transit travellers. See Changi Airport website for more information on transiting.

Check flight schedules directly with your airline. Confirm your arrangements with your airline or travel agent before travelling.

Expect to be screened during your transit in Singapore. You may be security screened when boarding your flight to Singapore and before boarding your connecting flight. See  Changi Airport website for further information on transit requirements.

Check the Immigration & Checkpoints Authority website or Changi Airport for the latest advice.

Other formalities

You need to scan your thumbprints each time you arrive and depart Singapore. Children aged younger than 6 years don't need to.

If you register your thumbprints on BioScreen at the immigration counter on arrival, you can use the self-clearance system for departure.

If you're carrying medication that's controlled in Singapore, you'll need an import permit to show on arrival. (See ' Health ')

Some countries, including Singapore, won't let you enter unless your passport is valid for 6 months after you plan to leave that country. This can apply even if you're transiting or stopping over.

Some foreign governments and airlines apply the rule inconsistently. Travellers can receive conflicting advice from different sources.

You can end up stranded if your passport is not valid for more than 6 months.

The Australian Government does not set these rules. Check your passport's expiry date before you travel. If you're not sure it'll be valid for long enough, consider getting a new passport .

Lost or stolen passport

Your passport is a valuable document. It's attractive to people who may try to use your identity to commit crimes.

Some people may try to trick you into giving them your passport. Always keep it in a safe place.

If your passport is lost or stolen, tell the Australian Government as soon as possible:

  • In Australia, contact the  Australian Passport Information Service .
  • If you're overseas, contact the nearest  Australian embassy or consulate .

Passport with ‘X’ gender identifier

Although Australian passports comply with international standards for sex and gender, we can’t guarantee that a passport showing 'X' in the sex field will be accepted for entry or transit by another country. Contact the  nearest  embassy, high commission or consulate of your destination  before you arrive at the border to confirm if authorities will accept passports with 'X' gender markers.

  • LGBTI travellers

The official currency is the Singapore Dollar (SGD).

You can easily exchange Australian dollars for SGD in Singapore.

You must declare amounts over SGD20,000 or the same amount in foreign currency on arrival. This covers all forms of currency, not only cash.

ATMs are available across the country. Hotels, restaurants and shops accept international credit cards.

  • The Immigration & Checkpoints Authority (ICA)  

Local travel

Driving permit.

To drive, you must be at least 18 years old and have an Australian driver's licence and an International Driving Permit (IDP).

If you stay longer than 12 months, you'll need a Singaporean licence.

If you're a permanent resident, get a Singaporean licence within 3 months of getting residency.

  • Singapore Government

Road travel

Road conditions and driving practices are similar to those found in Australian capital cities.

  • Driving or riding

Motorcycles

Check if your travel insurance policy covers you when riding a motorbike.

Always wear a helmet.

Safe, metered taxis are available from official taxi ranks.

Rideshare services are legal and widely used.

Public transport

Singapore's efficient rail network  Mass Rapid Transit (SMRT)  runs throughout the island between 5:30am and midnight.

There's also a large network of public and private bus services.

  • SBS Transit
  • Transport and getting around safely

Piracy  occurs in the coastal areas around Singapore.

If you're  travelling by boat , take safety precautions.

  • Going on a cruise
  • International Maritime Bureau

DFAT doesn't provide information on the safety of individual commercial airlines or flight paths.

Check  Singapore's air safety profile  with the Aviation Safety Network.

  • Air travel ​​

Emergencies

Depending on what you need, contact your:

  • family and friends
  • travel agent
  • insurance provider

Always get a police report when you report a crime.

Your insurer should have a 24-hour emergency number.

Consular contacts

Read the  Consular Services Charter  for what the Australian Government can and can't do to help you overseas.

For consular assistance, contact the Australian High Commission in Singapore.

Australian High Commission, Singapore

25 Napier Road Singapore 258507  Phone: (+65) 6836 4100  Fax: (+65) 6737 7465  Website:  singapore.highcommission.gov.au Email:  [email protected] Facebook:  Australian in Singapore Twitter: @AusHCSG  

Check the High Commission website for details about opening hours and any temporary closures.

24-hour Consular Emergency Centre

In a consular emergency, if you can't contact an embassy, call the 24-hour Consular Emergency Centre on:

  • +61 2 6261 3305 from overseas
  • 1300 555 135 in Australia

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singapore tourism vaccination requirements

  • Passports, travel and living abroad
  • Travel abroad
  • Foreign travel advice

Entry requirements

This advice reflects the UK government’s understanding of current rules for people travelling on a full ‘British citizen’ passport from the UK, for the most common types of travel.

The authorities in Singapore set and enforce entry rules. If you’re not sure how these requirements apply to you, contact the Singapore High Commission in the UK .

COVID-19 rules

There are no COVID-19 testing or vaccination requirements for travellers entering Singapore.

Passport validity requirements

To enter Singapore, your passport must have an ‘expiry date’ 6 months after the date you arrive.

If you are a resident in Singapore there is no minimum passport validity required. Apply for a renewal before your passport expires.

Singapore does not recognise dual nationality beyond the age of 21. A citizen of Singapore is required by Singapore law to renounce any other nationalities they hold before the age of 22 in order to retain their Singaporean citizenship.

Check with your travel provider that your passport and other travel documents meet requirements. Renew your passport if you need to.

You will be denied entry if you do not have a valid travel document or try to use a passport that has been reported lost or stolen.

Checks at border control

All arrivals in Singapore must complete an electronic SG Arrival Card in the 3 days before they enter Singapore. This online form asks for travel details and a health declaration. It is illegal to submit a false declaration. Biometric information is also recorded and scanned when you enter and depart Singapore (iris, facial and fingerprints).

Screening for drugs

You can be screened for drugs in your system on arrival in Singapore, including if you’re travelling through. You can be charged with drug consumption even if the drugs were taken in another country, including countries where the use of that particular drug is legal.

You could be detained without trial and, if convicted, you could be imprisoned, caned or executed .

Ship’s crew

There are different entry requirements if you are crew working on ships, small vessels, or pleasure crafts arriving at one of Singapore’s ports or marinas.

Visa requirements

You do not need a visa to enter Singapore. The Immigration and Checkpoints Authority decides who can enter Singapore and how long they can stay.

Penalties for overstaying

Penalties for overstaying the time allowed include fines, imprisonment, caning and deportation depending on how long you have overstayed. When you leave Singapore, officials can take your fingerprints if they suspect you are involved in any crime.

Vaccination requirements

At least 8 weeks before your trip, check the vaccinations and certificates you need in TravelHealthPro’s Singapore guide .

If you are arriving from certain countries in Africa and Latin America,  you will need to show a yellow fever certificate to enter Singapore . Failure to do so may result in mandatory quarantine or being refused entry to Singapore.

Accommodation 

There are strict laws preventing accommodation being let out for short term rental, such as for tourists.

Customs rules

There are strict rules about goods you can take into or out of Singapore. You must declare anything that may be prohibited or subject to tax or duty.

It’s illegal to import controlled drugs into Singapore. If convicted, you could be imprisoned, caned or executed .

The following items are also illegal to bring into Singapore:

  • vaporisers and e-cigarettes
  • tobacco products that are chewed or injected
  • chewing gum to sell
  • weapons and ammunition (including empty cartridge cases and air guns)
  • replica guns, including lighters shaped like a pistol or revolver
  • radio communications equipment

See the complete list of prohibited items on the Singapore Customs website.

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  9. MOH

    However, if the traveler is to stay in Singapore beyond 30 days and continue to enjoy vaccinated privileges, they must meet our domestic requirements to be considered fully vaccinated, which includes the three-dose requirement for Sinovac and Sinopharm, and the booster requirement.

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  22. Singapore Travel Advice & Safety

    Updated: 07 December 2023 Latest update:We've reviewed our advice for Singapore and continue to advise exercise normal safety precautions. Do not bring medicinal cannabis to Singapore, even during transit (see 'Travel'). We advise: Exercise normal safety precautions in Singapore. Get the latest updates Download map of Singapore (PDF 284.95 KB)

  23. Entry requirements

    There are no COVID-19 testing or vaccination requirements for travellers entering Singapore. Passport validity requirements To enter Singapore, your passport must have an 'expiry date' 6...