Travel Documents You Need to Visit Mexico

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Passports have been mandatory for air travel between the United States and Mexico since the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative came into effect in 2007. But for travel by land and sea, there are a few alternative travel documents which are still accepted in some situations.

Traveling to Mexico With Children

When traveling to Mexico, U.S. citizens, Canadians, and other foreign visitors should check what identification and travel documents are valid and necessary. If you are traveling to Mexico with children , there are some special requirements you may need to complete before you book your trip.

U.S. Citizens

  • Passport: A passport is hands-down the best form of identification and proof of citizenship. It is highly recommended that you get a passport to travel to Mexico. If you'll be entering the country by air, it's necessary. If for some reason you are unable to get a passport or do not want to, you will need one of the following documents to travel to Mexico by land or sea. These documents are acceptable travel documents for all United States citizens.
  • Passport card: Issued by the U.S. Department of State, this passport substitute is credit-card sized and valid for entry into Mexico by land or sea. The passport card  is not accepted for air travel . This passport card can also be used for land and sea travel to Mexico, Canada, Bermuda, and the Caribbean. A passport card also costs less than a passport, however, a passport is more useful overall, especially if you plan on traveling outside of North America.
  • Enhanced Drivers License: Enhanced Drivers Licenses are proof of citizenship and identity. These special drivers licenses are valid for travel to Mexico by land or sea but are not valid for air travel. It's important to keep in mind that these are only available in some states, including Michigan, New York, Vermont, and Washington. You will need to research your individual state licensing department for specific details.
  • SENTRI Card: The U.S. Customs and Border Protection issue the SENTRI Card to pre-approved travelers who cross the U.S./Mexico border frequently. It has the added benefit of access to dedicated commuter lanes for crossing the border. The card is valid for five years.
  • FAST card: The FAST card provides expedited travel to pre-approved commercial truck drivers between the U.S. and Canada, and U.S. and Mexico borders through dedicated lanes.

U.S. Permanent Residents

For permanent residents of the United States, the I-551 Permanent Resident card is required for return to the US. For entry into Mexico, you will need to present a passport, and depending on your country of citizenship, possibly a visa as well.

Canadian Citizens

Mexico is the second most popular tourist destination for Canadian travelers . Since 2010, a new requirement was put into place, which states that a passport is required for Canadian citizens traveling to Mexico.

Citizens of Other Countries

A passport is necessary, and in some cases, a visa is also required for citizens outside of the US. Contact the Mexican embassy or consulate nearest you for more information about the requirements specific to your situation.

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Mexico Entry Requirements

Entry requirements for Mexico vary depending on the traveler’s nationality. The vast majority of foreigners must obtain a visa before entering Mexico. Currently, only 69 countries enjoy visa-exempt status for Mexico.

Whether they need to get a visa or not all foreigners must carry their valid ID (usually, the passport) as they cross the Mexican border . Moreover, all visitors must obtain and complete an FMM (Forma Migratoria Multiple, or Tourist Card) before they can enter.

Countries with Entry Requirements to Mexico

No matter the country that issued a traveler's passport, all those entering Mexico are required to submit an FMM .

Some nationalities eligible for a Mexico Tourist Card are:

  • Switzerland
  • United Kingdom
  • United States

All foreign nationals must be granted a Mexican visa before visiting the country unless they belong to one of the following categories:

  • They hold a passport issued by one of the 69 countries enjoying visa-free travel to Mexico.
  • They already have a valid visa for one of the Schengen countries, Canada, Japan, the United Kingdom, or the United States.
  • They are permanent residents of one of the Schengen member states, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Japan, Peru, the United Kingdom, or the United States.
  • They have a valid APEC Business Travel Card (APBTC) with the ‘Mex’ code on the back and come from Australia, Brunei, Chile, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, the Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam.

Not all foreigners are eligible to apply for the same visas using the same channels. For example, only citizens of Russia, Turkey, and Ukraine can apply for a Mexican visa online (SAE).

What Documents Are Needed for Entry to Mexico?

The type of documents that are required in order to obtain permission to enter Mexico varies. However, all travelers must complete the Mexico Tourist Card before they can enter Mexico .

Travelers who are not visa-exempt for Mexico also need to obtain a visa in advance of travel. Visa requirements vary on the type of permit one is applying for .

Essential documents for all visas include:

  • A valid, eligible passport
  • A visa application form completed in all of its parts as accurately as possible

mexico visa requirements

An electronic travel permit (officially called Sistema de Autorización Electrónica or SAE) is the easiest and quickest way to get permission to enter Mexico . To complete a SAE application, only the above documents are required and can be uploaded in digital format from anywhere in the world thanks to the online system.

Documents required for a Mexico entry permit: offline applications

Depending on the type of visa one is applying for, there are a variety of documents that a prospective visitor may need to submit. The reason for these document requirements is usually to prove the applicant’s plans, motivation to travel, financial capacity, and more.

Find below a list of supporting documentation covering several Mexican visas that can only be obtained offline.

Please note that it is a general list only, and that specific information should be obtained from a Mexican embassy or consulate before starting an application.

  • Itinerary information including hotel reservations
  • Travel plans such as a return plane ticket proving the applicant’s intention of remaining in Mexico only temporarily
  • A recent, passport-sized photograph
  • Financial information demonstrating the traveler’s ability to support themselves during their time in Mexico (this can be submitted in the form of cash, bank statements, credit cards, etc)
  • Health information such as evidence of vaccinations and/ or medical insurance cover
  • Invitation letter from a Mexican citizen or entity
  • Official business letter stating the reason for the applicant’s travel
  • Invitation letter from a Mexican institution to attend official events
  • Invitation letter from an institution part of the National Education System stating the foreigner’s purposes and length of studies in Mexico

Foreign citizens should also note that while the electronic authorization can be paid for online via debit or credit card, most visas require the payment of an application fee in cash directly at the embassy.

Passport Requirements for Mexico

All foreign citizens must hold a valid and eligible passport if they wish to enter the Mexican territory. For all visitors, the passport must:

  • Be valid for at least 6 months after the intended date of entry
  • Contain blank pages to receive entry/exit stamps

Travelers crossing into Mexico by land are able to use either a valid passport book or passport card to enter the country.

Those who need a visa to enter Mexico must make sure that their passport data exactly matches the information provided in the visa application form .

Should the applicant’s passport fail to satisfy these criteria, the visa will be denied or canceled.

Please note that the passport provided during the application process and the granted visa are directly linked. Should the passport expire before the travel permit, both will become invalid and the traveler will have to apply again once a new passport is issued.

Foreign nationals will be asked to show their passport in several occasions including:

  • When applying for the Mexico visa
  • At the airport (travelers may be refused boarding if they fail to show their passport (and visa, if applicable) together with their plane ticket)
  • At the immigration check at the Mexican border
  • At checkpoints across the country

Although not all non-Mexican citizens need a visa, all foreigners must have a valid passport with them as they visit the country.

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Online Entry Immigration Form for Mexico

Are you traveling to Mexico?  To ease the immigration entry process, you can now fill out the Mexico Immigration Form online prior to travel.   This is an alternative to filling out the immigration forms typically filled out on the airline upon your arrival in Mexico.

( Travel Advisory: Some commercial airlines no longer hand out immigration forms aboard their airplanes.  We highly recommend you fill out the form(s) online now so you don’t delay your immigration process when you arrive in Mexico.)

Apply for a tourist card online on the website of Mexico’s National Immigration Institute: Entry Immigration Form Tourist Card .

Please note that the tourist card must be completed for every person traveling, regardless of age and how long you are staying in Mexico. It’s important to note that you can’t fill out this form until you are within 30 days of travel.  So when you’re within this timeframe, and ready to complete these forms online, here’s  how it works.

Here’s what you need to complete the form:

  • Contact information
  • Passport information
  • Full Name of the Hotel in Mexico (Address is asked, but not required)
  • Arrival flight information
  • Email address to send you the Tourist Card
  • A printer to print the Tourist Card

Important Reminder: Do not forget to sign the form , or you may delay your entry into Mexico.

Tourist Card FAQ:

What is a Tourist Card and why do I need it?

  • If you are visiting Mexico you need a Tourist Card which is an Entry Immigration Form that details information about your visit to Mexico. The Tourist Card is per person regardless of age and how long you will stay in Mexico. The information you provide in the Tourist Card is kept by the Mexican Immigration Authority as an official record of your visit to Mexico.

Do I need to send my passport for inspection?

  • NO , you DO NOT need to send your passport. On the application form will ask you for the information needed from your passport in order to process your Tourist Card. When you land in Mexico you will be required to present your passport and your Tourist Card to enter Mexico.

How long do I have to keep my Tourist Card?

  • There are two (2) parts of the Immigration Form, the Entry Form & the Exit Form. You will be emailed both forms already completed with the proper information and when you arrive in Mexico you will immediately proceed to the immigration booth at the airport where the immigration officer will keep the ENTRY Part of your form and he/she will stamp the Exit Part of the form which you will keep while in Mexico. When you are checking in for your flight back home, you will present the Exit Part of your form along with your passport.

Questions?  Please contact your travel agent.

https://www.inm.gob.mx/fmme/publico/en/solicitud.html

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  • Forma Migratoria Múltiple

Multiple Immigration Form (FMM)

General conditions.

The FMM applicant shall hold a valid and current passport or card passport (Tarjeta Pasaporte) in accordance with the international law regulations; in case the country of citizenship requires it, the passport must have a valid unexpired visa.

The applicant is aware that the card passport (Tarjeta Pasaporte) can only be used in the border crossings by land and for visiting the border zone; it might not be used to travel to the territory of the Mexican Republic or used for international air trips.

The applicant shall complete the information needed in the request of the FMM, as appears in his/her passport.

The applicant accepts under oath, that the information and documents provided are true; therefore, the applicant acknowledges herein that if any false information is provided, he/she could be subject to penalties in accordance with the applicable legal regulation.

Conditions of the Forma Migratoria Múltiple obtained by electronic means

The Forma Migratoria Múltiple can be obtained by electronic means through the Institute website, the foreigners, who enter to the country by land, can obtain it through the facilities aimed for the international transit of persons.

The applicant agrees that the status condition of stay that he/she shall obtain, by means of the information provided, only be as visitor without permission to work.

The applicant acknowledges herein that the FMM has a maximum validity of 180 calendar days and shall be valid for one entry only.

The applicant acknowledges herein that the validity term of the FMM shall start upon the migratory stamp is fixed, provided with, he/she should comply with the requirements to enter Mexico.

The applicant shall print and bring the FMM to the facility aimed for the international transit of persons where he/she wishes to enter through.

The applicant acknowledges herein that the fees paid to obtain the condition of stay, is not a guarantee to enter Mexico.

The applicant shall produce a valid and current passport or card passport (Tarjeta Pasaporte), as well as the FMM shall be produced at the time his/her enter is requested.

I have read and agree to the terms and conditions above.

Aviso de Privacidad Simplificado Registro para los procesos de Internación y Salidas del Territorio Nacional Mexicano

El Instituto Nacional de Migración (INM) a través de las Direcciones Generales de Control y Verificación Migratoria, Administración, así como Tecnologías de la Información y Comunicaciones, respectivamente es el responsable de los datos personales que sean recabados como parte de su registro en los procesos de internación y salidas del territorio nacional mexicano, con la finalidad de revisar se cumplan con los requisitos establecidos en la Ley de Migración y ordenamientos aplicables, comprobando la veracidad y congruencia de lo manifestado para su paso a territorio nacional con la documentación de los mismos, ejerciendo la facultad de autorizar o no el ingreso a la República Mexicana y la obtención de un tiempo y/o condición de estancia a su favor; documentar el flujo de entradas y salidas al país de los nacionales y extranjeros; generar el control migratorio por los lugares destinados al tránsito internacional de personas por tierra, mar y aire; hacer más ágil la internación a México; generar estadísticas; realizar el cobro de derechos que por los servicios migratorios se deriven y garantizar el tránsito y la estancia de los extranjeros en el mismo, así como la preservación de la soberanía y de la seguridad de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos. Los datos personales que nos proporcione, serán protegidos conforme a lo dispuesto por la Ley General de Protección de Datos Personales en Posesión de Sujetos Obligados, y demás normatividad que resulte aplicable.

El aviso de privacidad integral lo podrá consultar en la página institucional, dentro del apartado de Protección de Datos Personales, o bien, en la siguiente liga: http://www.inm.gob.mx/static/transparencia/pdf/avisos/Aviso_de_Privacidad_Internacion_y_Salidas.pdf .

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For your application, you need to make payment. Said payment must be made in the Portal de Servicios del Instituto Nacional de Migración (https://www.inm.gob.mx/spublic/portal/inmex.html). It is important to keep the following information to be able to reference your payment:

Immigration Form:

Document number:

Surname(s):

Nationality:

For more information, we suggest you carefully read the material available in the section on “Ayuda del Portal”.

Note: In order to generate the payment in the INM service portal, it is necessary to have an active account and the passport that you will register in your application.

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Entry Requirements and Customs in Mexico

Entering Mexico During the Covid-19 Pandemic Health and safety regulations are not mandated on a federal level in Mexico and therefore vary by state. None are requiring negative Covid-19 tests for entry, but most are mandating that restaurants and other public facilities to reduce capacity by either 40 or 50 percent. Mexico also has no quarantine requirements, but it does ask incoming visitors to fill out a health declaration form  and provide contact info . Many airports are also checking the temperatures of arriving travelers. Important: if you are returning to the United States, you must get tested (NAAT or antigen) no more than 3 days before your flights to the U.S. or present documentation of having recovered from Covid-19 within the last three months.

Onsite testing is now available at many resorts; when planning your trip, check ahead with your hotel, or the destination's tourism website, for information about the area's testing options. Passports

Citizens from all countries are required to present a valid passport for entry to Mexico. That includes all U.S. citizens, including children. They are required to present a valid passport or passport card for travel beyond the "border zone" into Mexico, with the "border zone" defined as an area within 20 to 30km (12-19 miles) of the United States. The passport should be valid for, at minimum, 6 months from your time of arrival in country.

All U.S. and Canadian citizens traveling by air or sea to Mexico are required to present a valid passport or other valid travel document to enter or reenter the United States except if returning from a closed-loop cruise. In addition, all travelers, including U.S. and Canadian citizens, attempting to enter the United States by land or sea must have a valid passport or other WHTI compliant document.

Other valid travel documents include the Passport Card and the U.S. Coast Guard Mariner Document. Members of the U.S. Armed Forces on active duty are eligible for fee-free passports. U.S. citizens may apply for the limited-use, wallet-size Passport Card, but we think applying for a regular passport makes more sense, as the passport card is valid only for land and sea travel between the U.S. and Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean region, and Bermuda, whereas a regular passport will work around the world.

Safeguard your passport in an inconspicuous, inaccessible place, and photograph the critical pages (those with your passport number and photo) so you have a digital record of it. If you lose your passport, visit the nearest consulate of your native country as soon as possible for a replacement.

Passport Offices

  • Australia -- Australian Passport Information Service (tel. 131-232; www.passports.gov.au ).
  • Canada -- Passport Office ( www.canada.ca , click on "Travel and Tourism").
  • Ireland -- Passport Office ( www.dfa.ie , click on "Passport Services").
  • New Zealand -- Passports Office (tel. 0800/225-050 in New Zealand or 04/474-8100; www.passports.govt.nz ).
  • United Kingdom -- HM Passport Office (tel. 0300/222-0000; www.gov.uk, click on "HM Passport Office").
  • United States -- To find your regional passport office, check the U.S. Department of State website ( travel.state.gov/passport ).

No visa is required for visitors to Mexico from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the U.K., and the U.S., among other countries (see www.inm.gob.mx/gobmx/word/index.php/paises-no-requieren-visa-para-mexico for the full list). Visitors can stay legally for up to 180 days. At the entry point, you'll be given a Mexico Visitor's Permit (FMM) to fill out. Try not to lose it, as you'll need to show it when leaving the country, to prove you are within the 180 day limit. If you do lose it, you'll need to apply for a replacement at a local immigration office (available in every city and many towns) or at the airport. Taking a photo of the document is a good idea. The fee to replace the FMM is about $30 USD.

Your FMM is stamped on arrival. If traveling by bus or car, ensure that you obtain such a card at the immigration module located at the border and have it stamped by immigration authorities at the border. If you do not receive a stamped tourist card at the border, ensure that, when you arrive at your destination within Mexico, you immediately go to the closest National Institute of Immigration office, present your bus ticket, and request a tourist card. Travelers who fail to have their tourist card stamped may be fined, detained, or expelled from the country.

If you plan to enter Mexico by car, please read the vehicle's importation requirements.

Note on travel of minors: Mexican law requires that any non-Mexican citizen under the age of 18 departing Mexico without both parents must carry notarized written permission from the parent or guardian who is not traveling with the child to or from Mexico. This permission must include the name of the parent, the name of the child, the name of anyone traveling with the child, and the notarized signature(s) of the absent parent(s). The U.S. Department of State recommends that permission include travel dates, destinations, airlines, and a summary of the circumstances surrounding the travel. The child must be carrying the original letter (not a facsimile or scanned copy), and proof of the parent/child relationship (usually a birth certificate or court document) and an original custody decree, if applicable. Travelers can also contact the Mexican Embassy or closest Mexican Consulate for more current information.

If you have an unusual amount of luggage or an oversized piece, you may be subject to inspection. Passengers that arrive by air will be required to put their bags through an X-ray machine, and then move to the kiosk and push a button to determine whether their luggage will be selected for any further inspection.

What You Can Bring into Mexico :   When you enter Mexico, Customs officials will be tolerant if you are not carrying illegal drugs or firearms. Tourists are allowed to bring in their personal effects duty-free. The underlying guideline is: Don't bring anything that looks as if it's meant to be resold in Mexico. The website of the U.S. Embassy  has guidance on what can be brought into the country.

For information on what non-Mexican visitors can be bring home from Mexico, be sure to check with your home country (use the link above for U.S. regulations):

Australian Citizens: The Australian government provides a detailed list of what can and cannot be brought home from abroad ( www.abf.gov.au ; click on "Entering and Leaving Australia").

Canadian Citizens: For a clear summary of Canadian rules, go to the Canada Border Services Agency ( www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca , click on "Customs Tarriff").

New Zealand Citizens: Most questions are answered by the New Zealand Customs Service ( www.customs.govt.nz , click on "Personal" to see the rules for individuals bringing goods back into the country).

U.K. Citizens: Full information can be found on the website of the HM Revenue & Customs at tel. 0845/010-9000 ( www.gov.uk ).

Medical Requirements

Unless you're arriving from an area known to be suffering from an epidemic (particularly cholera or yellow fever, see top of page for Covid-19 information), inoculations or vaccinations are not required for entry into Puerto Rico.

If you have a medical condition that requires syringe-administered medications, carry a valid signed prescription from your physician; syringes in carry-on baggage will be inspected. Insulin in any form should have the proper pharmaceutical documentation. If you have a disease that requires treatment with narcotics, you should also carry documented proof with you -- smuggling narcotics aboard a plane carries severe penalties in Mexico.

Note : This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.

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  • For U.S. Citizens/Lawful Permanent Residents

Are You Planning a Trip to Mexico from the United States?

Warning: it's Illegal to Carry Firearms or Ammo into Mexico.

For border crossing information, tune into the port of entry's Loop Radio on 1620 AM. Report drug and alien smuggling. Call (956) 542-5811 in the U.S., 001800-0105237 from Mexico.

Prohibited/Permissible Items

  • All articles acquired in Mexico must be declared.
  • $800 exemption for gifts and personal articles, including one liter of alcoholic beverages per person over 21 every 30 days.
  • Cuban cigars are prohibited.
  • Check with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) about importing any medications prior to crossing into Mexico.
  • CBP has a zero-tolerance policy on illegal drugs. Any type, in any amount may result in serious fines, seizure of vehicle, federal record and/or imprisonment.
  • Switchblade knives, sea turtle boots or any other articles of endangered species (i.e. spotted cats, coral, crocodile, elephant, etc) are prohibited.

Prohibited/Permissible Agricultural Items

  • Most fruits are prohibited (No oranges or apples)
  • Do not take U.S. fruits and meats to Mexico-You cannot bring them back.
  • Before you go to Mexico, ask a CBP Officer for a list of items you can bring back.
  • Fines of $50 to $1,000 may result if you fail to declared agricultural items.

Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission

  • You must be 21 years of age to possess alcoholic beverages, if you are not 21, the alcohol will automatically be confiscated.
  • One liter of alcohol and one case of beer may be imported per person every 30 days.
  • No ID=no liquor. You must prove that you are 21 or older. If you show false or altered personal identification, the ID will be confiscated and you will be prosecuted.
  • If you are 18 or over one carton of cigarettes may be imported.
  • It is illegal in Texas to consume or possess with intent to consume alcoholic beverages in a public place on Sundays between 2:15 a.m. and noon or on any other day between 2:15 a.m. and 7 a.m.
  • You are required to pay state tax on all alcoholic beverages and all cigarettes imported into Texas.
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Riviera Nayarit Mexico Tourist Entry Documents

travel papers for mexico

What You Need to Enter Mexico

Mexico entry requirements are pretty much the same for United States citizens and Canadian citizens travelling to México as tourists. You only need to present a valid passport and complete the correct entry forms (Migratory Form for Foreign Tourists, Transmigrants, Business Visitors or Councillor Visitors). The Mexico entry forms are generally available at travel agencies, airline offices, and at all entry points into Mexico.

Mexico entry requirements for international visitors from other countries are a little different. International visitors from any country other than Canada and the U.S.A. must obtain a visa in order to enter México, which they may obtain by contacting a Mexican Consulate in their country. In order to grant a visa, the Mexican consulate will require a passport, proof of sufficient economic means for the duration of their stay, and proof of payment for the processing fee.

International tourists may stay in México for up to 180 days. When they enter Mexico by air, the processing fee payment (approximately $22 USD) is included in the price of the airplane ticket. When entering Mexico by land, the processing fee must be paid during your stay and validated upon your departure. International tourists that enter by land and stay less than seven days in México do not need to pay for processing.

Mexico entry requirements stipulate that you will need the following 3 documents in order to enter Mexico:

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1. Valid Passport

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 2. FMT (Tourist, Business), FM2 or FM3 Form

3. Custom’s declaration form

The government of Mexico requires current proof of citizenship, a photo ID, and a valid passport for entry into Mexico.

TIP:  Carry a photocopy of your passport and keep the original in a safe place and make sure your passport does not expire within 6 months or you might be denied entry into Mexico, even for shorter visits!

You will need an FMT (Mexican Visitor’s Permit), which is valid for up to 6 months. If arriving by plane, you will be provided with one to fill out before departing the plane.

 It is very important to keep your Tourist Permit in a safe place – you will need it in order to leave the country. If lost, you need to apply for an exit permit (about $40 USD) and you might miss your flight!

You will also be required to fill out a customs declarations form.

Please email  [email protected]  or call us at  1-800-960-5917  if you still have questions about Mexico entry requirements.

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travel papers for mexico

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Warnings and insurance

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The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) provides advice about risks of travel to help British nationals make informed decisions. Find out more about FCDO travel advice .

Areas where FCDO advises against all but essential travel

Your travel insurance could be invalidated if you travel against FCDO advice. Consular support is also severely limited where FCDO advises against travel.

State of Baja California

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the city of Tijuana, except:

  • airside transit through Tijuana airport
  • the Cross Border Xpress bridge from the airport linking terminals across the Mexican-US border
  • the federal toll road 1D and Via Rápida through Tijuana to the border

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the city of Tecate in Baja California (including roads between Tijuana and Tecate)

Note: FCDO does not advise against all travel or all but essential travel to any part of the state of Baja California Sur.

State of Chihuahua

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the state of Chihuahua, except:

  • the city of Chihuahua
  • the border crossing in Ciudad Juárez (accessed by federal toll road 45)
  • federal toll road 45D connecting the cities of Chihuahua and Ciudad Juárez
  • the Copper Canyon rail route to and from Chihuahua and towns immediately on this route including Creel
  • the road from Creel via San Juanito to San Pedro
  • state highway 16 from San Pedro to Chihuahua

State of Colima

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the state of Colima, except:

  • the city of Manzanillo accessed by sea or air via the Manzanillo-Costalegre International Airport

State of Guanajuato

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the areas southwest of road 45D.

State of Guerrero

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the state of Guerrero, except:

  • the town of Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa accessed by air
  • the town of Taxco accessed by the 95D and 200D federal toll roads

State of Jalisco

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the areas south and southwest of Lake Chapala to the border with the state of Colima.

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the northern municipalities of:

  • Chimaltitán
  • Hostotipaquillo
  • Huequilla el Alto
  • San Martin de Bolaños
  • Santa Maria de los Ángeles
  • Villa Guerrero

State of Michoacán

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the state of Michoacán, except:

  • the city of Morelia accessed by federal toll roads 15D, 126 and 43; and the federal toll road 48D between the city of Morelia and the General Francisco Mujica airport
  • the town of Pátzcuaro accessed by federal toll roads 14D and 15 from Morelia, and boat trips out to islands on Lake Pátzcuaro
  • the Federal Highway 15D

State of Sinaloa

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the state of Sinaloa, except:

  • the cities of Los Mochis and Mazatlán
  • road 32 that runs between El Fuerte and Los Mochis
  • the 15D federal toll road that runs the length of the state
  • the Copper Canyon rail route to and from Los Mochis, El Fuerte and the towns immediately on this route

State of Tamaulipas

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the state of Tamaulipas, except:

  • the border crossing at Nuevo Laredo accessed by federal toll road 85D from Monterrey

State of Zacatecas

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the state of Zacatecas.

Find out more about why FCDO advises against travel to these areas .

Hurricane Otis

Hurricane Otis hit the south coast of Mexico around Acapulco as a Category 5 hurricane on 25 October. Hurricane Otis caused significant damage to infrastructure in Acapulco and along Mexico’s southern coast between Zihuatenejo and Punta Maldonado. There continues to be disruption to tourism while reconstruction efforts are ongoing and the security situation is unpredictable. The Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office advises against all but essential travel to the city of Acapulco.

For more information, see  Hurricanes .

Before you travel

No travel can be guaranteed safe. Read all the advice in this guide and any specific travel advice that applies to you: 

  • women travellers  
  • disabled travellers  
  • LGBT+ travellers

Follow and contact FCDO travel on Twitter , Facebook and Instagram . You can also sign up to get email notifications when this advice is updated.

Travel insurance

If you choose to travel, research your destinations and get appropriate travel insurance . Insurance should cover your itinerary, planned activities and expenses in an emergency.

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Caution October 19, 2023

Worldwide caution, update january 10, 2024, information for u.s. citizens in the middle east.

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Mexico Travel Advisory

Travel advisory august 22, 2023, see state summaries.

Reissued after periodic review with general security updates, and the removal of obsolete COVID-19 page links.

Country Summary: Violent crime – such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery – is widespread and common in Mexico. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico, as travel by U.S. government employees to certain areas is prohibited or restricted. In many states, local emergency services are limited outside the state capital or major cities.

U.S. citizens are advised to adhere to restrictions on U.S. government employee travel. State-specific restrictions are included in the individual state advisories below. U.S. government employees may not travel between cities after dark, may not hail taxis on the street, and must rely on dispatched vehicles, including app-based services like Uber, and regulated taxi stands. U.S. government employees should avoid traveling alone, especially in remote areas. U.S. government employees may not drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico, except daytime travel within Baja California and between Nogales and Hermosillo on Mexican Federal Highway 15D, and between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey on Highway 85D.

Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to Mexico.

Do Not Travel To:

  • Colima state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Guerrero state  due to  crime .
  • Michoacan state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Sinaloa state due to  crime  and  kidnapping
  • Tamaulipas state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping.
  • Zacatecas  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Baja California  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Chihuahua state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Durango state  due to  crime .
  • Guanajuato state  due to  crime and kidnapping .
  • Jalisco state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Morelos state  due to  crime .
  • Sonora state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .

Exercise Increased Caution When Traveling To:

  • Aguascalientes  state due to  crime .
  • Baja California Sur state  due to  crime .
  • Chiapas state  due to  crime .
  • Coahuila state  due to  crime .
  • Hidalgo state  due to  crime .
  • Mexico City  due to  crime .
  • Mexico State  due to  crime .
  • Nayarit state  due to  crime.
  • Nuevo Leon  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Oaxaca state  due to  crime .
  • Puebla state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Queretaro state  due to  crime .
  • Quintana Roo state  due to  crime .
  • San Luis Potosi state  due to  crime and kidnapping .
  • Tabasco state  due to  crime .
  • Tlaxcala state due to  crime .
  • Veracruz state  due to  crime .

Exercise Normal Precautions When Traveling To:

  • Campeche state
  • Yucatan state

Visit our website for  Travel to High-Risk Areas .

If you decide to travel to Mexico:

  • Keep traveling companions and family back home informed of your travel plans. If separating from your travel group, send a friend your GPS location. If taking a taxi alone, take a photo of the taxi number and/or license plate and text it to a friend.
  • Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving alone or at night. In many states, police presence and emergency services are extremely limited outside the state capital or major cities.
  • Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Follow the U.S. Embassy on Facebook and Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for Mexico.
  • Mariners planning travel to Mexico should check for U.S. maritime  advisories  and  alerts , which include instructions on reporting suspicious activities and attacks to Mexican naval authorities.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest travel health information related to your travel. 

Aguascalientes state – Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Aguascalientes state.

Baja California state – Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime and kidnapping.

Transnational criminal organizations compete in the border area to establish narco-trafficking and human smuggling routes. Violent crime and gang activity are common. Travelers should remain on main highways and avoid remote locations. Of particular concern is the high number of homicides in the non-tourist areas of Tijuana. Most homicides appeared to be targeted; however, criminal organization assassinations and territorial disputes can result in bystanders being injured or killed. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

U.S. government employees must adhere to the noted restrictions:

  • Mexicali Valley:  U.S. government employees should avoid the Mexicali Valley due to the heightened possibility of violence between rival cartel factions.  The boundaries of the restricted area are: to the east, the Baja California/Arizona and Baja California/Sonora borders; to the south, from La Ventana (on Highway 5) due east to the Colorado River; to the west, Highway 5; and to the north, Boulevard Lazaro Cardenas/Highway 92/Highway 1 to Carretera Aeropuerto, from the intersection of Highway 1 and Carretera Aeropuerto due north to the Baja California/California border, and from that point eastward along the Baja California/California border.
  • Travelers may use Highways 2 and 2D to transit between Mexicali, Los Algodones, and San Luis Rio Colorado during daylight hours. Travelers may also use Highways 1 and 8 to transit to and from the Mexicali Airport during daylight hours.  Travel on Highway 5 is permissible during daylight hours.

There are no other travel restrictions for U.S. government employees in Baja California state. These include high-traffic tourism areas of border and coastal communities, such as  Tijuana ,  Ensenada , and  Rosarito .

Baja California Sur state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Baja California Sur state.

Campeche state – Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Campeche state.

Chiapas state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Chiapas state.

Chihuahua state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common. Most homicides are targeted assassinations against members of criminal organizations. Battles for territory between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens and U.S. government employees, including restaurants and malls during daylight hours. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

U.S. government employee travel is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Ciudad Juarez:  U.S. government employees may travel to the area of Ciudad Juarez bounded to the east by Bulevar Independencia; to the south by De los Montes Urales/Avenida Manuel J Clouthier/Carretera de Juárez; to the west by Via Juan Gabriel/Avenida de los Insurgentes/Calle Miguel Ahumada/Francisco Javier Mina/Melchor Ocampo; and to the north by the U.S.-Mexico border.  Direct travel to the Ciudad Juarez airport (officially called the Abraham González International Airport) and the factories located along Bulevar Independencia and Las Torres is permitted.  Travel to San Jerónimo is permitted only through the United States via the Santa Teresa U.S. Port of Entry; travel via Anapra is prohibited.

U.S. government employees may only travel from Ciudad Juarez to the city of Chihuahua during daylight hours via Federal Highway 45, with stops permitted only at the Guardia Nacional División Caminos station, the Umbral del Milenio overlook area, the border inspection station at KM 35, and the shops and restaurants on Federal Highway 45 in the city of Ahumada.

  • U.S. government employees may travel between Ciudad Juarez and Ascension via Highway 2.
  • Nuevo Casas Grandes Area (including Nuevo Casas Grandes, Casas Grandes, Mata Ortiz, Colonia Juárez, Colonia LeBaron, Paquimé and San Buenaventura):  U.S. government employees may travel to the Nuevo Casas Grandes area during daylight hours via Mexico Federal Highway 2, and subsequently Federal Highway 10, to Nuevo Casas Grandes.  Employees are permitted to stay overnight in the cities of Nuevo Casas Grandes and Casas Grandes only.
  • City of Chihuahua:  U.S. government employees may travel at any time to the area of the city of Chihuahua bounded to the north by Avenida Transformación; to the east by Avenida Tecnológico/Manuel Gómez Morín/Highway 16/Blvd.José Fuentes Mares; to the west by the city boundary; and to the south by Periférico Francisco R. Almada.
  • U.S. government employees may travel on Highways 45, 16, and 45D through the city of Chihuahua and to the Chihuahua airport (officially called the General Roberto Fierro Villalobos International Airport). 
  • U.S. government employees may travel to Santa Eulalia to the east of the city of Chihuahua, as well as to Juan Aldama via Highway 16 to the northeast.
  • U.S. government employees may travel south of the city of Chihuahua on Highway 45 to the southern boundary of Parral, including each town directly connected to Highway 45, including Lázaro Cárdenas, Pedro Meoqui, Santa Cruz de Rosales, Delicias, Camargo, Ciudad Jiménez, and Parral itself.
  • U.S. government employees may only travel on official business from the city of Chihuahua on Highway 16 to Ciudad Cuauhtémoc bounded by Highway 21 to the north and east, Highway 5 to the west, and Bulevar Jorge Castillo Cabrera to the south. 
  • Ojinaga:  U.S. government employees must travel to Ojinaga via U.S. Highway 67 and enter through the U.S. Port of Entry in Presidio, Texas.
  • Palomas:  U.S. government employees may travel to Palomas via U.S. highways through the U.S. Port of Entry in Columbus, New Mexico, or via Highway 2 in Mexico.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Chihuahua, including  Copper Canyon .

Coahuila state – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime and gang activity occur in parts of Coahuila state. 

U.S. government employees must adhere to the following travel restrictions:

  • Zaragoza, Morelos, Allende, Nava, Jimenez, Villa Union, Guerrero, and Hidalgo municipalities : U.S. government employees may not travel to these municipalities.
  • Piedras Negras and Ciudad Acuña:  U.S. government employees must travel directly from the United States and observe a curfew from midnight to 6:00 a.m. in both cities.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Coahuila state.

Colima state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime and kidnapping.  

Violent crime and gang activity are widespread. Most homicides are targeted assassinations against members of criminal organizations. Shooting incidents between criminal groups have injured or killed bystanders. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.  

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with noted restrictions: 

  • Manzanillo:   U.S. government employee travel is limited to the tourist and port areas of Manzanillo.  
  • Employees traveling to Manzanillo from Guadalajara must use Federal Toll Road 54D during daylight hours.  

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Colima state. 

Durango state – Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Durango state.

  • West and south of Federal Highway 45:  U.S. government employees may not travel to this region of Durango state.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Durango state.

Guanajuato state – Reconsider Travel

Gang violence, often associated with the theft of petroleum and natural gas from the state oil company and other suppliers, occurs in Guanajuato, primarily in the south and central areas of the state.  Of particular concern is the high number of murders in the southern region of the state associated with cartel-related violence. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Areas south of Federal Highway 45D:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area south of and including Federal Highway 45D, Celaya, Salamanca, and Irapuato.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Guanajuato state, which includes tourist areas in:  San Miguel de Allende ,  Guanajuato City , and  surrounding areas.

Guerrero state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime.

Crime and violence are widespread. Armed groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and may use violence towards travelers. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping in previous years.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following area with the noted restrictions:

  • Taxco:  U.S. government employees must use Federal Highway 95D, which passes through Cuernavaca, Morelos, and stay within downtown tourist areas of Taxco. Employees may visit Grutas de Cacahuamilpa National Park during the day with a licensed tour operator.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of the state of Guerrero, including to tourist areas in  Acapulco ,  Zihuatanejo , and  Ixtapa .

Hidalgo state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Hidalgo state.

Jalisco state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Jalisco state. In Guadalajara, territorial battles between criminal groups take place in tourist areas. Shooting incidents between criminal groups have injured or killed innocent bystanders. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Jalisco-Michoacan border and Federal Highway 110:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area between Federal Highway 110 and the Jalisco-Michoacan border, nor travel on Federal Highway 110 between Tuxpan, Jalisco, and the Michoacan border.
  • Federal Highway 80:  U.S. government employees may not travel on Federal Highway 80 south of Cocula.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S government employees in Jalisco state which includes tourist areas in:  Guadalajara Metropolitan Area ,  Puerto Vallarta (including neighboring Riviera Nayarit) ,  Chapala , and  Ajijic .

Mexico City (Ciudad de Mexico) – Exercise Increased Caution

Both violent and non-violent crime occur throughout Mexico City. Use additional caution, particularly at night, outside of the frequented tourist areas where police and security patrol more routinely. Petty crime occurs frequently in both tourist and non-tourist areas.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Mexico City.

Mexico State (Estado de Mexico) – Exercise Increased Caution

Both violent and non-violent crime occur throughout Mexico State. Use additional caution in areas outside of the frequented tourist areas, although petty crime occurs frequently in tourist areas as well.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Mexico State.

Michoacan state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime and kidnapping.

Crime and violence are widespread in Michoacan state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Federal Highway 15D:   U.S. government employees may travel on Federal Highway 15D to transit the state between Mexico City and Guadalajara.
  • Morelia:  U.S. government employees may travel by air and by land using Federal Highways 43 or 48D from Federal Highway 15D.
  • Lazaro Cardenas:  U.S. government employees must travel by air only and limit activities to the city center or port areas.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of the state of Michoacan, including the portions of the  Monarch Butterfly Reserve  located in Michoacan.

Morelos state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Morelos state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Morelos state.

Nayarit state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout Nayarit state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S government employees in Nayarit state.

Nuevo Leon state – Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime and kidnapping.

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Nuevo Leon state.

Oaxaca state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence occur throughout the state.

U.S. travelers are reminded that U.S. government employees must adhere to the following travel restrictions:

  • Isthmus region:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area of Oaxaca bounded by Federal Highway 185D to the west, Federal Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca-Chiapas border to the east.  This includes the cities of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas Atempa.  
  • Federal Highway 200 northwest of Pinotepa:  U.S. government employees may not use Federal Highway 200 between Pinotepa and the Oaxaca-Guerrero border.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees to other parts of Oaxaca state, which include tourist areas in:  Oaxaca City ,  Monte Alban ,  Puerto Escondido,  and  Huatulco .

Puebla state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Puebla state.

Queretaro state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Queretaro state.

Quintana Roo state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur in any location, at any time, including in popular tourist destinations.  Travelers should maintain a high level of situational awareness, avoid areas where illicit activities occur, and promptly depart from potentially dangerous situations. 

While not directed at tourists, shootings between rival gangs have injured innocent bystanders.  Additionally, U.S. citizens have been the victims of both non-violent and violent crimes in tourist and non-tourist areas.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Quintana Roo state. However, personnel are advised to exercise increased situational awareness after dark in downtown areas of Cancun, Tulum, and Playa del Carmen, and to remain in well-lit pedestrian streets and tourist zones.

San Luis Potosi state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state.  U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in San Luis Potosi state.

Sinaloa state – Do Not Travel

Violent crime is widespread. Criminal organizations are based in and operating in Sinaloa. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Mazatlan:  U.S. government employees may travel to Mazatlan by air or sea only, are limited to the Zona Dorada and historic town center, and must travel via direct routes between these destinations and the airport and sea terminal.
  • Los Mochis and Topolobampo:  U.S. government employees may travel to Los Mochis and Topolobampo by air or sea only, are restricted to the city and the port, and must travel via direct routes between these destinations and the airport.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Sinaloa state.

Sonora state – Reconsider Travel

Sonora is a key location used by the international drug trade and human trafficking networks. Violent crime is widespread. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping. Travelers should maintain a heightened level of awareness of their surroundings in all their travels in Sonora.  Security incidents may occur in any area of Sonora.

  • Travel between Hermosillo and Nogales:  U.S. government employees may travel between the U.S. Ports of Entry in Nogales and Hermosillo during daylight hours via Federal Highway 15 only. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures. Travelers should exercise caution and avoid unnecessary stops as security incidents, including sporadic, armed carjackings, and shootings have been reported along this highway during daylight hours. Travelers should have a full tank of gas and inform friends or family members of their planned travel.
  • Nogales:  U.S. government employees may not travel in the triangular area north of Avenida Tecnologico, west of Bulevar Luis Donaldo Colosio (Periferico), nor east of Federal Highway 15D (Corredor Fiscal). U.S. government employees also may not travel in the residential and business areas to east of the railroad tracks along Plutarco Elias Calle (HWY 15) and Calle Ruiz Cortino, including the business area around the Morley pedestrian gate port-of-entry. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in Nogales due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.  
  • Puerto Peñasco:  U.S. government employees may travel between Puerto Peñasco and the Lukeville-Sonoyta U.S. Port of Entry during daylight hours via Federal Highway 8 only. They may not travel on any other route to Puerto Peñasco. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in Puerto Peñasco. due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.
  • Triangular region near Mariposa U.S. Port of Entry:  U.S. government employees may not travel into or through the triangular region west of the Mariposa U.S. Port of Entry, east of Sonoyta, and north of Altar municipality.
  • San Luis Rio Colorado, Cananea, and Agua Prieta : U.S. government employees may travel directly from the nearest U.S. Port of Entry to San Luis Rio Colorado, Cananea (via Douglas Port of Entry), and Agua Prieta, but may not go beyond the city limits. Travel is limited to daylight hours only. Travel between Nogales and Cananea via Imuris is not permitted. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in these cities due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.
  • Eastern and southern Sonora (including San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas and Alamos):  U.S. government employees may not travel to areas of Sonora east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and State Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16. U.S. government employees may travel to San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas and Alamos; travel to Alamos is only permitted by air and within city limits.  U.S. government employees may not travel to areas of Sonora south of Federal Highway 16 and east of Federal Highway 15 (south of Hermosillo), as well as all points south of Guaymas, including Empalme, Guaymas, Obregon, and Navojoa.  U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in these areas due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.

U.S. government employees may travel to other parts of Sonora state in compliance with the above restrictions, including tourist areas in: Hermosillo , Bahia de Kino , and Puerto Penasco .

Tabasco state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Tabasco state.

Tamaulipas state – Do Not Travel

Organized crime activity – including gun battles, murder, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, forced disappearances, extortion, and sexual assault – is common along the northern border and in Ciudad Victoria. Criminal groups target public and private passenger buses, as well as private automobiles traveling through Tamaulipas, often taking passengers and demanding ransom payments.

Heavily armed members of criminal groups often patrol areas of the state and operate with impunity particularly along the border region from Reynosa to Nuevo Laredo.  In these areas, local law enforcement has limited capacity to respond to incidents of crime. Law enforcement capacity is greater in the tri-city area of Tampico, Ciudad Madero, and Altamira, which has a lower rate of violent criminal activity compared to the rest of the state.

U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Matamoros and Nuevo Laredo:  U.S. government employees may only travel within a limited radius around and between the U.S. Consulates in Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros, their homes, the respective U.S. Ports of Entry, and limited downtown sites, subject to an overnight curfew.
  • Overland travel in Tamaulipas:  U.S. government employees may not travel between cities in Tamaulipas using interior Mexican highways. Travel between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey is limited to Federal Highway 85D during daylight hours with prior authorization.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other parts of Tamaulipas state.

Tlaxcala state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Tlaxcala state.

Veracruz state – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime and gang activity occur with increasing frequency in Veracruz, particularly in the center and south near Cordoba and Coatzacoalcos. While most gang-related violence is targeted, violence perpetrated by criminal organizations can affect bystanders. Impromptu roadblocks requiring payment to pass are common.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Veracruz state.

Yucatan state – Exercise Normal Precautions

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Yucatan state, which include tourist areas in:  Chichen Itza ,  Merida ,  Uxmal , and  Valladolid .

Zacatecas state – Do Not Travel

Violent crime, extortion, and gang activity are widespread in Zacatecas state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Zacatecas City : U.S. government employee travel is limited to Zacatecas City proper, and employees may not travel overland to Zacatecas City.
  • U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Zacatecas state.

Travel Advisory Levels

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COVID-19: travel health notice for all travellers

Mexico travel advice

Latest updates: The Need help? section was updated.

Last updated: February 21, 2024 11:51 ET

On this page

Safety and security, entry and exit requirements, laws and culture, natural disasters and climate, mexico - exercise a high degree of caution.

Exercise a high degree of caution in Mexico due to high levels of criminal activity and kidnapping.

Guerrero - Avoid all travel

This advisory excludes the cities of Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo and Taxco, where you should exercise a high degree of caution.

Regional Advisory - Avoid non-essential travel

  • all Chihuahua
  • all Colima, except the city of Manzanillo
  • all Coahuila, except the southern part of the state at and below the Saltillo-Torreón highway corridor
  • all Durango, except Durango City
  • Highway 45 between León and Irapuato
  • the area south of and including Highway 45D between Irapuato and Celaya
  • all Michoacán, except the city of Morelia
  • the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas
  • the municipality of Xoxocotla
  • the area within 20 km of the border with Sinaloa and Durango
  • the city of Tepic
  • all Nuevo León, except the city of Monterrey
  • all Sinaloa, except the city of Mazatlán
  • all Sonora, except the cities of Hermosillo and Guaymas/San Carlos and Puerto Peñasco
  • all Tamaulipas
  • all Zacatecas

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Deteriorating security situation in Guerrero State

Hurricane Otis struck Guerrero State on October 25, 2023. The security situation remains volatile and unpredictable after the storm. Damage to transportation and communications networks have left many towns and cities isolated, increasing the risk of criminal and gang activity.

Certain areas are particularly affected by banditry and violence, including:

  • the highway between Acapulco and Zihuantanejo
  • the highway between Acapulco to Chilpancingo

You should avoid all travel to Guerrero State. If you are in Guerrero despite the advisory, you should take necessary precautions to ensure your safety, including:

  • avoid travelling alone or after dark
  • exercise extreme vigilance
  • monitor local media for the latest updates on the situation
  • follow the instructions of local authorities

Levels of crime, particularly violent crime, are high throughout Mexico. Arrest and detention rates are low and don’t deter criminal activity.

Criminal groups, including drug cartels, are very active. ‎Clashes between cartels or gangs over territory, drugs and smuggling routes are common.

In some parts of the country, military, navy and federal police forces have been deployed to combat organized crime and improve security conditions. They maintain a visible presence by:

  • patrolling the streets
  • setting up roadblocks
  • conducting random vehicle checks  

If you plan on travelling to Mexico:

  • remain vigilant at all times
  • stay in tourist areas
  • be very cautious on major highways
  • avoid travelling at night
  • monitor local media closely

If you’re the victim of a crime, you must report it immediately to local authorities. No criminal investigation is possible without a formal complaint. Complaints must be made in person before leaving Mexico. You should hire a local lawyer to represent your interests and follow up on your case after you return to Canada. Failure to do may result in incomplete investigations or long delays in bringing cases to trial.

Violent crime

There are high rates of violent crime, such as homicides, kidnappings, carjacking and assaults, including in popular tourist destinations such as the Mayan Riviera (Cancún, Playa del Carmen, Puerto Morelos and Tulum), and Acapulco.

Criminal groups and drug cartels are present in tourist areas. Inter-gang and cartel fighting has taken place in restaurants, hotels and nightclubs frequented by tourists.

Innocent bystanders have been injured or killed. You may be in the wrong place at the wrong time and become a victim of violent crime.

Border areas often see higher criminal activity and violence, including in rural areas. Confrontations between organized criminal groups and Mexican authorities continue to pose a risk. Shootouts, attacks and illegal roadblocks may occur without warning.

You should travel to Mexico by air to avoid international land border crossings, particularly along the border with the United States, in the following cities:

  • Ciudad Juárez
  • Nuevo Laredo

If crossing an international land border:

  • remain extremely vigilant
  • use only official border crossings

Armed robbery

Armed robbery occurs. Foreigners have been targets of robberies that sometimes involve assault.

Robbers will follow a victim after they exchange or withdraw money at airports, currency exchange bureaus ( casas de cambio ) or ATMs.

  • Stay in hotels and resorts with good security
  • If you are threatened by robbers, stay calm and don’t resist
  • Avoid withdrawing or exchanging money in public areas of the airport

Canadian travellers have been physically and sexually assaulted. In some cases, hotel employees, taxi drivers and security personnel at popular tourist destinations were involved. In some cases, hotel staff are not helpful and try to dissuade victims from pursuing the incident with police.

  • Avoid walking after dark, especially alone
  • Avoid isolated or deserted areas
  • Avoid excessive alcohol consumption

Are you a victim of sexual violence? – Government of Canada and British Embassy Mexico City

Credit card and ATM fraud

Credit card and ATM fraud occurs in Mexico. When using debit or credit cards:

  • pay careful attention when others are handling your cards
  • use ATMs located in public areas or inside a bank or business
  • avoid using card readers with an irregular or unusual feature
  • cover the keypad with one hand when entering your PIN
  • check for any unauthorized transactions on your account statements

Overcharging

Some bars and nightclubs may try to charge exorbitant prices. Discussions about overcharging may lead to threats of violence and security guards may force you to pay. Avoid running a tab or leaving your credit card with bar or restaurant staff.

Overseas fraud

Police officers

Legitimate police officers have extorted money from tourists or arrested tourists for minor offences such as :

  • drinking alcohol on the street
  • urinating on public roads
  • traffic violations

They have requested immediate cash payment in exchange for their release. Travellers driving rental cars have been targeted.

If this occurs:

  • don’t hand over your money or your passport
  • ask for the officer’s name, badge and patrol car number
  • ask for a copy of the written fine, which is payable at a later date, or insist on going to the nearest police station

Virtual kidnappings

Extortion, including virtual kidnappings, is the third most common crime in Mexico. Criminals use a variety of tactics to gather information about potential victims for extortion purposes, including using social media sites or eavesdropping on conversations

In a virtual kidnapping, criminals contact the victim’s hotel room landline and threaten the victim to stay in their room. The criminals then instruct the victim to provide information needed for the caller to use to contact family and friends, to demand the immediate payment of ransom for their release.

  • Don't discuss travel plans, your room number or any other personal information around strangers
  • Never leave your cellphone unattended
  • Ensure your cellphone is password protected
  • Don't divulge personal business details to strangers in person or over the phone or on social media, especially when using hotel phones
  • If you're threatened on the phone or hear screams, hang up immediately
  • When you answer the phone, wait for the caller to speak. If the caller asks who is speaking, hang up immediately.
  • Don’t answer unrecognized or blocked phone numbers
  • Don’t answer hotel landlines

Kidnappings

Mexico has one of the highest kidnapping rates in the world. Kidnapping, including virtual and express kidnapping, is a serious security risk throughout Mexico.

Kidnappers target all classes. Canadian citizens and contractors working for Canadian businesses have been kidnapped, mostly in areas that are not under the control of police and security forces.

If you're kidnapped:

  • comply with the kidnappers’ requests
  • don’t attempt to resist

Express kidnappings

Express kidnappings occur in large urban areas. This is a method of kidnapping where criminals ask for a small and immediate ransom.

Thieves most commonly work in cooperation with, or pose as, taxi drivers. They force victims to use their debit or credit card to withdraw money from ATMs in exchange for their release.

  • Use only a reputable taxi company or a trusted ride-sharing app
  • Book taxis through your hotel or an authorized taxi stand ( sitio )

Petty theft

Petty crime, such as pickpocketing and purse snatching, is common in Mexico.

  • Be aware of your surroundings at all times, even in areas normally considered safe
  • Ensure that your belongings, including your passport and other travel documents, are secure at all times
  • Avoid showing signs of affluence, such as flashy jewellery, cell phones, headphones and designer bags
  • Carry only small amounts of money
  • Be cautious when withdrawing cash from ATMs

Home break-ins

Tourists staying in rental homes have been the victims of break-ins and burglaries. Whether you're staying in private or commercial accommodations, make sure you lock windows and doors securely.

Women’s safety

Women travelling alone may be subject to some forms of harassment and verbal abuse.

Some incidents of assault, rape and sexual assault against Canadian women have occurred, including at beach resorts and on public buses. 

  • Exercise caution when dealing with strangers or recent acquaintances
  • Be wary of rides or other invitations

Advice for women travellers

Spiked food and drinks

Never leave food or drinks unattended or in the care of strangers. Be wary of accepting snacks, beverages, gum or cigarettes from new acquaintances. These items may contain drugs that could put you at risk of sexual assault and robbery.

Unregulated alcohol

Some bars, restaurants and resorts have served counterfeit alcohol. Some travellers have reported getting sick or blacking out after drinking alcohol.

  • Be cautious if you choose to drink alcohol
  • Seek medical assistance if you begin to feel sick

Alcohol, drugs and travel

Height standards for balcony railings in Mexico can be considerably lower than those in Canada. Falls have resulted in deaths and injuries.

  • Exercise caution when standing close to balcony railings

Demonstrations

Demonstrations take place regularly throughout the country. Protests and roadblocks are common in:

  • Mexico City, including to and from the airport
  • the states of Chiapas, Guerrero, Michoacán and Oaxaca

Such incidents may last a long time, leading to shortages of fresh food, medicine and gasoline.

Even peaceful demonstrations can turn violent at any time. They can also lead to disruptions to traffic and public transportation.

  • Avoid areas where demonstrations and large gatherings are taking place
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities
  • Monitor local media for information on ongoing demonstrations

Mass gatherings (large-scale events)

Water activities

Coastal waters can be dangerous. Riptides are common. Several drownings occur each year.

Many beaches don’t offer warnings of dangerous conditions and they don’t always have lifeguards on duty.

Rescue services may not be consistent with international standards.

  • Consult local residents and tour operators for information on possible hazards and safe swimming areas
  • Always obey warning flags at beaches
  • Follow the instructions and warnings of local authorities

Water sports

Tour operators may not adhere to international standards. Many operators don’t conduct regular safety checks on their sporting and aquatic equipment.

Also, Canadians have been involved in accidents where operators of recreational vehicles, such as watercraft, have demanded compensation exceeding the value of the damage caused to the vehicle or equipment.

If you undertake water sports, such as diving:

  • choose a well-established and reputable company that has insurance
  • ensure that your travel insurance covers the recreational activities you choose
  • wear the appropriate safety equipment, such as helmets and life jackets
  • ensure that equipment is available and in good condition
  • don’t consume alcohol before the activity

If in doubt concerning the safety of the facilities or equipment, don’t use them.

Water safety abroad

Adventure tourism  

Outdoor activities, such as white water rafting, kayaking, scuba diving, snorkelling, bungee, zip lining, paragliding, hiking, mountain biking, etc and other adventure activities can be dangerous if unprepared. Trails are not always marked, and weather conditions can change rapidly, even during summer.  

Tour operators may not always adhere to international safety standards. 

If you intend to practice adventure tourism: 

  • consider hiring an experienced guide from a reputable company 
  • obtain detailed information on your activity and on the environment in which you will be setting out  
  • buy travel insurance that includes helicopter rescue and medical evacuation   
  • know the symptoms of acute altitude sickness, which can be fatal  
  • pay attention to the symptoms of dehydration and heatstroke, both of which can be fatal  
  • avoid venturing off marked trails  
  • ensure that you’re adequately equipped and bring sufficient water   
  • stay informed about weather and other conditions that may pose a hazard  
  • refrain from using facilities or equipment if you have doubts on their safety  
  • inform a family member or friend of your itinerary  

Road travel

Road conditions and road safety.

Road conditions and road safety can vary greatly throughout the country.

Road conditions can be dangerous due to:

  • sharp curves
  • poorly marked or hidden road signs
  • construction sites
  • roaming livestock
  • slow-moving or abandoned vehicles

Toll highways are typically safer and better maintained than secondary highways.

Mexican driving styles are very different from those in Canada. Many drivers don’t respect traffic laws, and police don’t strictly enforce these laws. Drivers often drive at excessive speeds and may be aggressive or reckless. Drinking and driving laws are not strictly enforced. Accidents causing fatalities are common. Police don’t regularly patrol the highways.

Roadblocks and checkpoints

Illegal roadblocks and demonstrations are common. Heavily armed gangs have attacked travellers on intercity highways. Criminals especially target sport utility vehicles and full-size pickup trucks for theft and carjacking.

The military searches for drugs and firearms at military checkpoints throughout the country.

  • Avoid road travel at night between cities throughout the country
  • Ensure that you only stop in major centres, at reputable hotels or at secure campsites
  • Keep your car doors locked and the windows closed, especially at traffic lights
  • Avoid hitchhiking which is not a common practice in Mexico
  • Don’t leave valuables in the vehicle
  • Rent cars that don’t have stickers or other advertisements for the rental company on them, as rental cars have been targets for robbery, sometimes using force
  • Ensure operators provide insurance and helmets if renting scooters
  • Travel on toll roads to lower the risk of targeted roadblocks and robberies
  • Never attempt to cross roadblocks, even if they appear unattended

Public transportation

Remain vigilant in airports, at bus stations, on buses and on the metro.

The Mexico City metro is often very crowded and a popular place for pickpocketing. There are metro cars dedicated to women and children during rush hours. They are located at the front of the trains.

The Metrobus in Mexico City, which has dedicated lanes and stops, is relatively safe. There are sections dedicated to women and children at the front of the buses.

The “colectivos” and “pesero” mini-buses that stop when hailed are frequently targeted for robbery.

When travelling to other cities, use bus companies that offer VIP or executive class transportation. These buses only travel on toll roads, which lower the risks of targeted roadblocks and robberies, and follow a speed limit.

Taxis and ridesharing services

Disputes between taxi and ridesharing application drivers may occur, especially in Quintana Roo. They may result in:

  • altercations

Although tourists have not been targeted, you may be caught up in these incidents and harassed or injured. 

In Mexico City, all government-authorized taxis have licence plates starting with “A” or “B.” Taxis from designated stands have both the logo of their company and the plate number stamped on the side of the car. Official taxis in Mexico City are pink and white. Users can validate the pink and white taxis on the CDMX app.

  • Avoid hailing taxis on the street
  • Don't share taxis with strangers

When arriving at an airport in Mexico, pre-pay the taxi fare at the airport (inside or outside the terminal) and ask to see the driver’s official identification. You can also use a ridesharing app to arrange for a pickup at certain airports. Not all airports in Mexico allow ridesharing service pickups.

If you use a trusted ridesharing app, confirm the driver’s identity and the licence plate before getting in the car.

Mi Taxi  – CDMX app (in Spanish)

Cruise ship travel

Plan carefully if you plan to take a cruise departing from or stopping in Mexico.

Advice for cruise travellers

Pirate attacks and armed robbery against ships occur in coastal waters of the Bay of Campeche. Mariners should take appropriate precautions.

Live piracy report  - International Maritime Bureau

We do not make assessments on the compliance of foreign domestic airlines with international safety standards.

Information about foreign domestic airlines

Every country or territory decides who can enter or exit through its borders. The Government of Canada cannot intervene on your behalf if you do not meet your destination’s entry or exit requirements.

We have obtained the information on this page from the Mexican authorities. It can, however, change at any time.

Verify this information with the  Foreign Representatives in Canada .

Entry requirements vary depending on the type of passport you use for travel.

Before you travel, check with your transportation company about passport requirements. Its rules on passport validity may be more stringent than the country’s entry rules.

Regular Canadian passport

Your passport must be valid for the expected duration of your stay in Mexico.

Passport for official travel

Different entry rules may apply.

Official travel

Passport with “X” gender identifier

While the Government of Canada issues passports with an “X” gender identifier, it cannot guarantee your entry or transit through other countries. You might face entry restrictions in countries that do not recognize the “X” gender identifier. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Other travel documents

Different entry rules may apply when travelling with a temporary passport or an emergency travel document. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Useful links

  • Foreign Representatives in Canada
  • Canadian passports

Tourist visa: not required Business visa: required Work visa: required Student visa: required

Required documents

To enter Mexico, you must present a valid passport and a duly completed tourist card (Multiple Immigration Form). Carry documents to prove the purpose of trip, such as hotel or tour booking confirmations, as immigration officers may request them.

Tourist card

You must obtain a tourist card to enter the country unless you stay in Mexico for less than 72 hours within the northern border zone. 

If you don’t obtain a tourist card upon arrival, you may face:

It is highly recommended to keep your digital tourist card, or tourist card if entered by land, with you at all times as proof of your legal stay in Mexico. You may be asked to show it to Mexican officials when exiting the country or if you are stopped on an immigration check point.

If you are stopped at an immigration check point and you are unable to prove your legal stay, you may be fined, detained or expelled from the country.

Entering by land

If entering Mexico by land, you must stop at the immigration office located at the border to obtain a tourist card, even if not explicitly directed by Mexican officials. Immigration officials will write down on your tourist card the number of days you are allowed to stay in Mexico.  

You may complete the tourist card form online before your arrival. However, you must print the form and present it to the migration official at the port of entry.

Multiple Immigration Form  - Government of Mexico

Entering by air

If entering Mexico by air, you are advised to download your tourist card issued by Mexican officials upon entry.

Depending on your airport of entry:

  • the immigration official will stamp your passport and note the number of days you are allowed to spend in Mexico or
  • you will go through an E-gate kiosk where you will scan your passport and self-register your entry in the country. Only use this option if you are entering Mexico as a tourist.

Once in the country, whether you entered via a E-gate or not, you will be able to access the digital tourist card online. You have 60 days to download it.

If you are unable to show your tourist card or digital tourist card upon departure, you will have to pay for a replacement at the immigration office of any international airport before boarding.

Make sure to plan sufficient time at the airport to obtain a new card in time for your flight.

Portal access for digital tourist card  - Government of Mexico

Length of stay

An immigration official will determine the number of days you can remain in Mexico and note it on your tourist card. The maximum length granted for a tourism-related trip is 180 days; the maximum number of days is not granted by default.

If you're seeking the maximum number of days, you may be required to:

  • explain the purpose of your trip to the immigration official
  • provide details about your trip (accommodations, funds, return flight, etc.)

You won’t be able to request an extension or change the condition of your stay from inside the country.

Canadians travelling to the northern border zone (within 21 kilometres of the U.S. border) for work don’t require a visa for stays of 72 hours or less.

If you require a business or work visa, you should take care of the process yourself. If a prospective employer is processing your visa for you:

  • obtain copies of all correspondence between the employer and Mexican immigration authorities
  • verify that these copies are stamped by the immigration authorities as proof that your papers are being processed
  • request a receipt from your employer for any document that you provide for purposes of obtaining the visa
  • avoid surrendering your passport to your employer

Volunteer, religious, research and eco-tourism activities

You may not be able to undertake volunteer, religious/missionary, research or certain forms of eco-tourism activities while visiting as a tourist. Contact the Mexican Embassy or closest Mexican consulate for information the type of visa required for these activities.

Tourism tax

Most visitors to Mexico must pay a tourism tax.

This fee is normally included in airline ticket prices. Visitors arriving by road or sea will have to pay this fee at any bank in Mexico. There is a bank representative at every port of entry. The bank receipt must be attached to the tourist card for submission at departure.

You don't have to pay this tax if:

  • you're entering by land for tourism purposes, and your stay will not exceed 7 days
  • you're travelling to the northern border zone for less than 72 hours
  • you're travelling to Mexico on a cruise ship

Dual citizenship

If entering and leaving Mexico as a dual citizen, you must identify yourself as a Mexican citizen. You must carry valid passports for both countries.

Laws about dual citizenship

Criminal records

Canadians with a criminal record or a warrant for arrest may be refused entry and returned to Canada or to a third country on the next available flight.

Children and travel

Learn more about travelling with children .

Yellow fever

Learn about potential entry requirements related to yellow fever (vaccines section).

Relevant Travel Health Notices

  • Global Measles Notice - 31 August, 2023
  • Zika virus: Advice for travellers - 31 August, 2023
  • COVID-19 and International Travel - 31 August, 2023
  • Dengue: Advice for travellers - 19 February, 2024

This section contains information on possible health risks and restrictions regularly found or ongoing in the destination. Follow this advice to lower your risk of becoming ill while travelling. Not all risks are listed below.

Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic preferably 6 weeks before you travel to get personalized health advice and recommendations.

Routine vaccines

Be sure that your  routine vaccinations , as per your province or territory , are up-to-date before travelling, regardless of your destination.

Some of these vaccinations include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, varicella (chickenpox), influenza and others.

Pre-travel vaccines and medications

You may be at risk for preventable diseases while travelling in this destination. Talk to a travel health professional about which medications or vaccines may be right for you, based on your destination and itinerary. 

Yellow fever is a disease caused by a flavivirus from the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

  • There is no risk of yellow fever in this country.

Country Entry Requirement*

  • Proof of vaccination is not required to enter this country.

Recommendation

  • Vaccination is not recommended.

* It is important to note that country entry requirements may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest diplomatic or consular office of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.

About Yellow Fever

Yellow Fever Vaccination Centres in Canada

There is a risk of hepatitis A in this destination. It is a disease of the liver. People can get hepatitis A if they ingest contaminated food or water, eat foods prepared by an infectious person, or if they have close physical contact (such as oral-anal sex) with an infectious person, although casual contact among people does not spread the virus.

Practise  safe food and water precautions and wash your hands often. Vaccination is recommended for all travellers to areas where hepatitis A is present.

Malaria  is a serious and sometimes fatal disease that is caused by parasites spread through the bites of mosquitoes.   There is a risk of malaria in certain areas and/or during a certain time of year in this destination. 

Antimalarial medication may be recommended depending on your itinerary and the time of year you are travelling. Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic before travelling to discuss your options. It is recommended to do this 6 weeks before travel, however, it is still a good idea any time before leaving.    Protect yourself from mosquito bites at all times:  • Cover your skin and use an approved insect repellent on uncovered skin.  • Exclude mosquitoes from your living area with screening and/or closed, well-sealed doors and windows. • Use insecticide-treated bed nets if mosquitoes cannot be excluded from your living area.  • Wear permethrin-treated clothing.    If you develop symptoms similar to malaria when you are travelling or up to a year after you return home, see a health care professional immediately. Tell them where you have been travelling or living. 

In this destination, rabies is carried by dogs and some wildlife, including bats. Rabies is a deadly disease that spreads to humans primarily through bites or scratches from an infected animal. While travelling, take precautions , including keeping your distance from animals (including free-roaming dogs), and closely supervising children.

If you are bitten or scratched by an animal while travelling, immediately wash the wound with soap and clean water and see a health care professional. Rabies treatment is often available in this destination. 

Before travel, discuss rabies vaccination with a health care professional. It may be recommended for travellers who are at high risk of exposure (e.g., occupational risk such as veterinarians and wildlife workers, children, adventure travellers and spelunkers, and others in close contact with animals). 

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease. It can spread quickly from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

Anyone who is not protected against measles is at risk of being infected with it when travelling internationally.

Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are fully protected against measles.

  Hepatitis B is a risk in every destination. It is a viral liver disease that is easily transmitted from one person to another through exposure to blood and body fluids containing the hepatitis B virus.  Travellers who may be exposed to blood or other bodily fluids (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment, sharing needles, tattooing, acupuncture or occupational exposure) are at higher risk of getting hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for all travellers. Prevent hepatitis B infection by practicing safe sex, only using new and sterile drug equipment, and only getting tattoos and piercings in settings that follow public health regulations and standards.

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious viral disease. It can spread from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

It is recommended that all eligible travellers complete a COVID-19 vaccine series along with any additional recommended doses in Canada before travelling. Evidence shows that vaccines are very effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19. While vaccination provides better protection against serious illness, you may still be at risk of infection from the virus that causes COVID-19. Anyone who has not completed a vaccine series is at increased risk of being infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 and is at greater risk for severe disease when travelling internationally.

Before travelling, verify your destination’s COVID-19 vaccination entry/exit requirements. Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are adequately protected against COVID-19.

 The best way to protect yourself from seasonal influenza (flu) is to get vaccinated every year. Get the flu shot at least 2 weeks before travelling.  

 The flu occurs worldwide. 

  •  In the Northern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs from November to   April.
  •  In the Southern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs between April and   October.
  •  In the tropics, there is flu activity year round. 

The flu vaccine available in one hemisphere may only offer partial protection against the flu in the other hemisphere.

The flu virus spreads from person to person when they cough or sneeze or by touching objects and surfaces that have been contaminated with the virus. Clean your hands often and wear a mask if you have a fever or respiratory symptoms.

Safe food and water precautions

Many illnesses can be caused by eating food or drinking beverages contaminated by bacteria, parasites, toxins, or viruses, or by swimming or bathing in contaminated water.

  • Learn more about food and water precautions to take to avoid getting sick by visiting our eat and drink safely abroad page. Remember: Boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!
  • Avoid getting water into your eyes, mouth or nose when swimming or participating in activities in freshwater (streams, canals, lakes), particularly after flooding or heavy rain. Water may look clean but could still be polluted or contaminated.
  • Avoid inhaling or swallowing water while bathing, showering, or swimming in pools or hot tubs. 

Travellers' diarrhea is the most common illness affecting travellers. It is spread from eating or drinking contaminated food or water.

Risk of developing travellers' diarrhea increases when travelling in regions with poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Practise safe food and water precautions.

The most important treatment for travellers' diarrhea is rehydration (drinking lots of fluids). Carry oral rehydration salts when travelling.

Typhoid   is a bacterial infection spread by contaminated food or water. Risk is higher among children, travellers going to rural areas, travellers visiting friends and relatives or those travelling for a long period of time.

Travellers visiting regions with a risk of typhoid, especially those exposed to places with poor sanitation, should speak to a health care professional about vaccination.  

Salmonellosis is a common illness among travellers to this country. It can be spread through contaminated food or beverages, such as raw or undercooked poultry and eggs, as well as fruits or vegetables.

Practice safe food and water precautions . This includes only eating food that is properly cooked and still hot when served.

Pregnant women, children under 5 years of age, those over 60 years of age, and those with weakened immune systems are at greater risk of becoming seriously ill.

Cases of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella have been reported among Canadian travellers returning from Mexico. These strains of Salmonella do not respond to some of the recommended antibiotics if treatment is needed.

Most people recover on their own without medical treatment and from proper rehydration (drinking lots of fluids).

  • Carry oral rehydration salts when travelling.

Travellers with severe symptoms should consult a health care professional as soon as possible.

Insect bite prevention

Many diseases are spread by the bites of infected insects such as mosquitoes, ticks, fleas or flies. When travelling to areas where infected insects may be present:

  • Use insect repellent (bug spray) on exposed skin
  • Cover up with light-coloured, loose clothes made of tightly woven materials such as nylon or polyester
  • Minimize exposure to insects
  • Use mosquito netting when sleeping outdoors or in buildings that are not fully enclosed

To learn more about how you can reduce your risk of infection and disease caused by bites, both at home and abroad, visit our insect bite prevention page.

Find out what types of insects are present where you’re travelling, when they’re most active, and the symptoms of the diseases they spread.

There is a risk of chikungunya in this country.  The risk may vary between regions of a country.  Chikungunya is a virus spread through the bite of an infected mosquito. Chikungunya can cause a viral disease that typically causes fever and pain in the joints. In some cases, the joint pain can be severe and last for months or years.

Protect yourself from mosquito bites at all times. There is no vaccine available for chikungunya.

American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease)   is a risk in this country. It is caused by a parasite spread by infected triatomine bugs. The infection can be inactive for decades, but humans can eventually develop complications causing disability and even death.

Risk is generally low for most travellers. Protect yourself from triatomine bugs, which are active at night, by using mosquito nets if staying in poorly-constructed housing. There is no vaccine available for Chagas disease.

  • In this country,   dengue  is a risk to travellers. It is a viral disease spread to humans by mosquito bites.
  • Dengue can cause flu-like symptoms. In some cases, it can lead to severe dengue, which can be fatal.
  • The level of risk of dengue changes seasonally, and varies from year to year. The level of risk also varies between regions in a country and can depend on the elevation in the region.
  • Mosquitoes carrying dengue typically bite during the daytime, particularly around sunrise and sunset.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites . There is no vaccine or medication that protects against dengue.

Zika virus is a risk in this country. 

Zika virus is primarily spread through the bite of an infected mosquito. It can also be sexually transmitted. Zika virus can cause serious birth defects.

During your trip:

  • Prevent mosquito bites at all times.
  • Use condoms correctly or avoid sexual contact, particularly if you are pregnant.

If you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, you should discuss the potential risks of travelling to this destination with your health care provider. You may choose to avoid or postpone travel. 

For more information, see Zika virus: Pregnant or planning a pregnancy.

Animal precautions

Some infections, such as rabies and influenza, can be shared between humans and animals. Certain types of activities may increase your chance of contact with animals, such as travelling in rural or forested areas, camping, hiking, and visiting wet markets (places where live animals are slaughtered and sold) or caves.

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, livestock (pigs, cows), monkeys, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats, and to avoid eating undercooked wild game.

Closely supervise children, as they are more likely to come in contact with animals.

Person-to-person infections

Stay home if you’re sick and practise proper cough and sneeze etiquette , which includes coughing or sneezing into a tissue or the bend of your arm, not your hand. Reduce your risk of colds, the flu and other illnesses by:

  •   washing your hands often
  • avoiding or limiting the amount of time spent in closed spaces, crowded places, or at large-scale events (concerts, sporting events, rallies)
  • avoiding close physical contact with people who may be showing symptoms of illness 

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) , HIV , and mpox are spread through blood and bodily fluids; use condoms, practise safe sex, and limit your number of sexual partners. Check with your local public health authority pre-travel to determine your eligibility for mpox vaccine.  

Medical services and facilities

The quality of care varies greatly throughout the country.

Good health care is available in private hospitals and clinics, but it’s generally expensive. Most private facilities won’t agree to deal directly with medical insurance companies and will require payment with a credit card in advance or a bank transfer/direct deposit.

Mental health services are extremely limited in Mexico, particularly outside of Mexico City. Services and treatment standards may differ substantially from those in Canada.

Medical evacuation can be very expensive and you may need it in case of serious illness or injury.

Make sure you get travel insurance that includes coverage for medical evacuation and hospital stays.

Travel health and safety

Medical tourism

Medical tourism is common in Mexico. Canadian travellers have had serious health complications following cosmetic or other elective surgeries abroad.

Before leaving for medical travel, you should do your research, especially on:

  • the health and financial risks
  • the medical facility where the procedure will be performed
  • language barriers, which can lead to misunderstandings about your medical care and conditions
  • travel insurance that includes coverage for the type of medical procedure you will be undergoing

You should discuss your medical plans with your primary healthcare provider in Canada before travelling. Most provincial and territorial health care programs are extremely limited in their coverage offered abroad.

  • Make sure that the healthcare providers you choose are authorized by the Mexican health authorities
  • Ask to see the credentials of the healthcare providers
  • Obtain a written agreement detailing the proposed treatment or procedure
  • Receiving medical care outside Canada
  • If you become sick or injured while travelling outside Canada or after your return
  • Medical tourism – Government of Mexico (in Spanish)

If you take prescription medication, you’re responsible for determining their legality in Mexico. 

  • Bring sufficient quantities of your medication with you
  • Always keep your medication in the original container
  • Pack your medication in your carry-on luggage
  • Carry a copy of your prescriptions

Medication cannot be sent to Mexico from Canada via courier services.

Many types of medication—both over-the-counter and prescription—are readily available with little oversight. Counterfeit medication is common in certain parts of Mexico. If you need to purchase medication while in Mexico, make sure to get it from a reputable location.

Federal Commission for protection against sanitary risk  (in Spanish)

Air quality in Mexico City

In Mexico City, you may experience health problems caused by high altitude or by air pollution, which is at its peak during the winter months.

Consult your doctor before booking your trip if you have lung, heart or respiratory problems.

Death in Mexico

If you plan to retire or spend long periods of time in Mexico, or travel there for medical procedures, you should:

  • share your plans or wishes with relatives
  • make sure important documents can easily be located
  • make arrangements in case of your death while in the country
  • What if I Die in Mexico? – Fact sheet
  • Death Abroad Factsheet

Keep in Mind...

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety.

Be prepared. Do not expect medical services to be the same as in Canada. Pack a   travel health kit , especially if you will be travelling away from major city centres.

You must abide by local laws.

Penalties for breaking the law in Mexico can be more severe than in Canada, even for similar offences.

Foreign nationals are often held in pre-trial detention and there can be lengthy delays before a trial.

Many petty crimes (such as public urination, failure to pay a bill or disorderly behaviour) can result in a 72-hour detention by police. Paying a fine can secure an early release from detention.

Detention conditions are below the standards of Canadian prisons.

  • Overview of the criminal law system in Mexico
  • Arrest and detention

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs are severe. Convicted offenders can expect lengthy prison sentences.

Drugs, alcohol and travel

Smoking is prohibited in all public places except for clearly marked designated smoking areas. This includes but is not limited to:

  • restaurants

You may be fined if you’re caught smoking in public.

Electronic cigarettes

It’s illegal to bring electronic cigarettes/vaping devices and solutions into Mexico.

You could have these items confiscated by customs officials if you have them in your possession. You could also be fined or detained.

It is strictly prohibited to sell or distribute these devices and solutions in Mexico.

Imports and exports

The Mexican government strictly enforces its laws concerning possession, importation and trafficking of firearms.

Anyone entering Mexico with a firearm or ammunition without prior written authorization from Mexican authorities is subject to imprisonment.

It is also illegal to enter the country with certain types of knives.

Importing vehicles and boats

Mexico has very strict rules regarding the importation of foreign vehicles and boats.

You must enter Mexico with the proper import permit and insurance, since it cannot be obtained once you are in Mexico. You may face a fine and have your vehicle seized if you enter Mexico without the proper permit.

You must present a paper document of your vehicle registration to obtain a vehicle importation permit from the Mexican authorities. If you present a digital document of your vehicle registration, your vehicle may be refused entry into Mexico.   

  • Vehicle importation  – Government of Mexico (in Spanish)
  • Temporary vehicle import application system  – Banjército
  • Travelling to Mexico by land  – Mexican Embassy in Canada

Cigarettes and alcohol

If you are older than 18, you are allowed to bring into Mexico up to:

  • 10 cigarette packs
  • 25 cigars or
  • 200 grams of tobacco
  • 3 litres of alcohol and
  • 6 litres of wine

If you bring more alcohol and cigarettes into Mexico than allowed, even if you declare your imported items, you will be subject to a high import fee. You will still be subject to a significant fee if you decide to relinquish your imported items

It’s illegal to possess archaeological artefacts or to export such items from Mexico.

  • Goods you can bring to Mexico as part of your personal luggage  – Government of Mexico
  • Goods you cannot bring into Mexico  – Government of Mexico
  • Agricultural product restrictions  – Government of Mexico (in Spanish)

Political activity

It’s illegal for foreigners to conduct political activity in Mexico, including participating in demonstrations.

2SLGBTQI+ travellers

Mexican law does not prohibit sexual acts between individuals of the same sex. However, homosexuality is not widely accepted in Mexican society, particularly in rural areas.

2SLGBTQI+ travellers could be discriminated against based on their sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression or sex characteristics. Transgender and gender non-conforming individuals are disproportionately targeted for violence and can face discrimination.

Travel and your sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex characteristics

Dual citizenship is legally recognized in Mexico.

If you are a Canadian citizen, but also a citizen of Mexico, our ability to offer you consular services may be limited while you're there. You may also be subject to different entry/exit requirements .

Travellers with dual citizenship

International Child Abduction

The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction is an international treaty. It can help parents with the return of children who have been removed to or retained in certain countries in violation of custody rights. The convention applies between Canada and Mexico.

If your child was wrongfully taken to, or is being held in Mexico, and if the applicable conditions are met, you may apply for the return of your child to the Mexican court.

If you are in this situation:

  • act as quickly as you can
  • contact the Central Authority for your province or territory of residence for information on starting an application under The Hague Convention
  • consult a lawyer in Canada and in Mexico to explore all the legal options for the return of your child
  • report the situation to the nearest Canadian government office abroad or to the Vulnerable Children’s Consular Unit at Global Affairs Canada by calling the Emergency Watch and Response Centre

If your child was removed from a country other than Canada, consult a lawyer to determine if The Hague Convention applies.

Be aware that Canadian consular officials cannot interfere in private legal matters or in another country’s judicial affairs.

  • List of Canadian Central Authorities for the Hague Convention
  • International Child Abduction: A Guidebook for Left-Behind Parents
  • Travelling with children
  • The Hague Convention - Hague Conference on Private International Law
  • Canadian embassies and consulates by destination
  • Emergency Watch and Response Centre

There are no clear procedures or regulations about surrogacy in Mexico.

If you're considering surrogacy, seek advice from legal professionals knowledgeable in Canadian and Mexican laws and citizenship procedures.

Identity documents

The names on your identity documents must be identical to those on your birth certificate to obtain official Mexican documents, such as marriage certificates, immigration documents or passports.

Middle names are often left off Canadian identity documents. This has caused significant difficulties for many Canadians. If you plan on residing in Mexico or dealing with the Mexican Civil Registry, obtain a Canadian passport that will meet Mexican requirements.

Identification

You should carry photo identification.

Authorities can ask you to show identification and a proof of your legal status in Mexico. They can demand to see your tourist card at any time. You must carry the original at all times. You must carry the original at all times, and should also carry a photocopy of the identification page of your passport.

Investments

If you plan on buying property, or making other investments in Mexico, seek legal advice in Canada and in Mexico. Do so before making commitments. Related disputes could take time and be costly to resolve.

Mexican real estate agents are not licensed or regulated.

  • Choose your own lawyer
  • Avoid hiring a lawyer recommended by a seller

Problems with timeshare arrangements occur.

Timeshare representatives may be very persistent. They use pressure tactics and offer free tours, meals, gifts or alcoholic beverages.

It's illegal for timeshare companies to ask you to sign a waiver that prevents you from cancelling a contract. You're legally entitled to cancel a timeshare contract without penalty within 5 working days. Contracts must be cancelled in writing directly with the timeshare company.

Before purchasing a timeshare:

  • gather as much information as possible
  • review carefully the contract; anything not included in the contract will not be honoured
  • provide your credit card only if you are sure you want to make the purchase
  • keep copies of all correspondence

If you suspect a fraud in the real estate procedures, contact the Federal Attorney’s Office of Consumer immediately.

  • Federal Attorney’s Office of Consumer (PROFECO)  – Mexican Government (in Spanish)
  • Should I buy a timeshare in Mexico? - Embassy of Mexico in Canada
  • Should I sell my timeshare in Mexico? - Embassy of Mexico in Canada

Rental accommodations

Rental agreements between two individuals in Mexico are considered a private matter and are not regulated by the government.

If you encounter difficulties with a rental agreement, you must obtain the services of a Mexican lawyer.

You should carry an international driving permit.

International Driving Permit

Auto insurance

Mexican liability insurance is mandatory. Canadian automobile insurance is not valid in Mexico.

You can obtain insurance at the Mexican border. You should obtain full coverage, including coverage for legal assistance.

Automobile insurance is much more expensive in Mexico than in Canada. Many local drivers don’t have any form of car insurance.

If you’re involved in an accident, and you don’t have Mexican liability insurance, you could be prevented from leaving the country until all parties agree that adequate financial satisfaction has been received. If you’re found to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs at the time of an accident, or if you don’t have a valid driver’s licence, your insurance will be considered invalid.

If you’re involved in a traffic accident, you may face serious legal problems, including imprisonment. You could be taken into custody until responsibility for the accident is determined and all fines are paid. You must report any accident you’re involved in to the police.

Driving restrictions in Mexico City

The Hoy No Circula (No Driving Today) program restricts some cars from driving in Mexico City and in some municipalities of the State of Mexico, from Monday to Saturday, from 5 am to 10 pm.

You will face driving restrictions depending on:

  • your car’s emission sticker
  • the last digit of your license plate
  • where your license plate was issued

Hoy No Circula program is strictly enforced. You may face heavy fines and temporary confiscation of your vehicle if you don’t comply. Consult the Hoy No Circula calendar before driving.

Electric and hybrid cars are exempted from these restrictions. Gas-fueled cars of a 2008 model or later may obtain a tourist pass valid for selected drive days.

  • Hoy no circula – Government of Mexico (in Spanish)
  • Tourist pass  – Government of Mexico (in Spanish)
  • Ministry of Environment  – Government of (in Spanish)

Buying/selling a vehicle

You must be either a temporary or a permanent resident if you wish to buy a car in Mexico.

It’s illegal to sell your imported vehicle in Mexico. If you do, your vehicle may be seized and you may be subject to a fine and deportation.

The currency of Mexico is the Mexican peso.

In some parts of Mexico, particularly tourist destinations, hotels and other service providers may advertise prices in USD.

There is a limit to the amount of U.S. dollars that residents and foreigners can exchange in Mexico, depending on your immigration status. The rule doesn’t apply to Canadian dollars but some financial institutions, hotels and currency exchange bureaus don’t make the distinction.

When carrying more than US$10,000 or the equivalent in other currencies, cash, cheques, money orders or any other monetary instrument, you must declare the amount exceeding US$10,000. Failure to make this declaration is against Mexican law and often results in detention.

Hurricane Otis

Hurricane Otis made landfall in Acapulco on October 25, 2023, causing significant damage to infrastructure. Avoid all travel to Guerrero state.

There are significant disruptions to the following essential services in Acapulco:

  • transportation, including flights
  • power distribution
  • water and food supply
  • telecommunications networks
  • emergency services
  • medical care, including hospitals.

Latest advisories  – U.S. National Hurricane centre

Mexico is subject to various natural disasters, such as:

  • earthquakes
  • volcanic eruptions
  • torrential rains, floods and mudslides
  • forest fires

In the event of a natural disaster:

  • monitor local news to stay informed on the evolving situation
  • follow the instructions of local authorities, including evacuation orders
  • Secretary of Integrated Risk Management and Civil Protection  – Government of Mexico City (in Spanish)
  • National Center for Disaster Prevention  (CENAPRED) – Government of Mexico (in Spanish)
  • Get prepared

Hurricane season

Hurricanes usually occur from mid-May to the end of November. During this period, even small tropical storms can quickly develop into major hurricanes.

These severe storms can put you at risk and hamper the provision of essential services.

If you decide to travel to a coastal area during the hurricane season:

  • know that you expose yourself to serious safety risks
  • be prepared to change your travel plans on short notice, including cutting short or cancelling your trip
  • stay informed of the latest regional weather forecasts
  • carry emergency contact information for your airline or tour operator
  • follow the advice and instructions of local authorities
  • Tornadoes, cyclones, hurricanes, typhoons and monsoons
  • Large-scale emergencies abroad
  • Active storm tracking and hurricane watches and warnings  - United States’ National Hurricane Center

Flooding and landslides

Heavy rains can cause flooding and landslides. Roads may become impassable and infrastructure damaged.

Earthquakes and tsunamis

Mexico is located in an active seismic zone. Earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions can occur.

A tsunami can occur within minutes of a nearby earthquake. However, the risk of tsunami can remain for several hours following the first tremor. If you’re staying on the coast, familiarize yourself with the region’s evacuation plans in the event of a tsunami warning.

Useful links:

  • National Seismological Institute  – Government of Mexico (in Spanish)
  • Latest earthquakes  - U.S. Geological Survey
  • Tsunami alerts  - U.S. Tsunami Warning System
  • Centre for Studies and Research of Volcanology  - University of Colima (in Spanish)

Forest fires may occur. The air quality in areas near active fires may deteriorate due to heavy smoke.

In case of a significant fire, stay away from affected areas, particularly if you suffer from respiratory ailments.

Local services

In case of an emergency, dial 911.

Roadside assistance

The Angeles Verdes is a highway patrol service that provides free assistance on all major toll highways from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

You can download the App on your mobile device.

In case of an emergency, you can also dial 078 or 800 006 8839 (toll-free in Mexico) to reach them.

Consular assistance

Aguascalientes, Chiapas, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Estado de Mexico, Guanajuato, Hidalgo, Michoacán, Morelos, Mexico City, Oaxaca, Puebla, Querétaro, San Luís Potosí, Tabasco, Tamaulipas, Tlaxcala, Veracruz, Zacatecas.

Campeche, Yucatán, and Quintana Roo north of the municipality of Solidaridad, including Puerto Morelos, Isla Mujeres and Holbox

Baja California, Sonora

For emergency consular assistance, call the Embassy of Canada to Mexico, in Mexico City, and follow the instructions. At any time, you may also contact the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa.

The decision to travel is your choice and you are responsible for your personal safety abroad. We take the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provide credible and timely information in our Travel Advice to enable you to make well-informed decisions regarding your travel abroad.

The content on this page is provided for information only. While we make every effort to give you correct information, it is provided on an "as is" basis without warranty of any kind, expressed or implied. The Government of Canada does not assume responsibility and will not be liable for any damages in connection to the information provided.

If you need consular assistance while abroad, we will make every effort to help you. However, there may be constraints that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide services.

Learn more about consular services .

Risk Levels

  take normal security precautions.

Take similar precautions to those you would take in Canada.

  Exercise a high degree of caution

There are certain safety and security concerns or the situation could change quickly. Be very cautious at all times, monitor local media and follow the instructions of local authorities.

IMPORTANT: The two levels below are official Government of Canada Travel Advisories and are issued when the safety and security of Canadians travelling or living in the country or region may be at risk.

  Avoid non-essential travel

Your safety and security could be at risk. You should think about your need to travel to this country, territory or region based on family or business requirements, knowledge of or familiarity with the region, and other factors. If you are already there, think about whether you really need to be there. If you do not need to be there, you should think about leaving.

  Avoid all travel

You should not travel to this country, territory or region. Your personal safety and security are at great risk. If you are already there, you should think about leaving if it is safe to do so.

Is it safe to visit Cancun or Puerto Peñasco for spring break? What travelers need to know

travel papers for mexico

Spring break is fast approaching, and many college students will celebrate with travels to Mexico.

Destinations like Cancun, a perennial favorite spring break spot, and Puerto Peñasco, which boasts the closest beach to Arizona, see more student visitors on break in March and April.

Travelers should use caution when visiting Mexico. The U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Embassy & Consulates in Mexico remain concerned about violent crime related to drug cartels and recently warned travelers who use rideshare apps like Uber in Cancun that taxi drivers have been attacking and harassing rideshare drivers and riders.

Here's what spring breakers should know about staying safe in Mexico.

New in Canada, Mexico: 5 new international flights added from Sky Harbor

Is it safe to go to Cancun, Mexico, right now?

The state of Quintana Roo, which includes Cancun as well as popular resort destinations like Tulum and Playa del Carmen, is currently under a Level 2 travel advisory from the U.S. Department of State. It means people should exercise increased caution when traveling.

On Jan. 23, the U.S. Embassy & Consulates in Mexico issued a security alert for Quintana Roo because of incidents involving taxi drivers attacking and harassing rideshare drivers and passengers .

The State Department's advisory cautions that shootings between rival gangs have injured innocent bystanders, adding that Americans have been crime victims in tourist and non-tourist areas.

Travelers are urged to maintain a high level of situational awareness in Quintana Roo, especially after dark. Anyone exploring Cancun after dark should stick to well-lit pedestrian streets and tourist zones, according to the State Department.

Is it safe to travel to Puerto Peñasco right now?

Sonora, which includes Puerto Peñasco, is currently under a Level 3 advisory from the State Department, which means reconsider travel. This is because of widespread violent crime and kidnapping in the state. That said, Puerto Peñasco, the beach resort town also known as Rocky Point, has a reputation as a safe destination.

Driving is the most common way tourists get to Puerto Peñasco, according to the city's convention and visitors bureau.

The State Department urges motorists to only use Federal Highway 8 via the Lukeville Port of Entry to travel to Puerto Peñasco and to only drive during daylight hours. Highway 8 was designated a "safety corridor" by Arizona and Sonora officials in 2016 and features safety features like bilingual signs, security cameras and locations where drivers can seek roadside assistance.

The Lukeville border crossing reopened on Jan. 4 after a monthlong closure prompted by a surge in migrants crossing the border. While the port of entry was closed, U.S. Customs and Border Protection initially suggested using the Nogales or San Luis crossings in the meantime. But the U.S. Consulate General later urged people not to take alternate routes to get to Rocky Point because of the risk of cartel violence.

What should I do to stay safe in Mexico?

The U.S. Embassy in Mexico offers the following recommendations:

  • Avoid travel to "do not travel" states.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Seek shelter if needed.
  • Monitor local media for updates and call 911 in case of emergency.
  • Review your personal security plans and follow the instructions of local authorities.
  • Get the latest Mexico travel alerts from the U.S. Embassy at mx.usembassy.gov/category/alert .

When is spring break 2024 in Arizona?

Arizona's three public universities — Arizona State, the University of Arizona and Northern Arizona University — as well as public schools in Maricopa County are on spring break in early and mid-March 2024.

  • Arizona State University: March 3-10.
  • University of Arizona: March 2-10.
  • Northern Arizona University: March 11-16.

Encantame Towers: What's in the newest condos in Rocky Point, 'Arizona's beach'

Michael Salerno is an award-winning journalist who’s covered travel and tourism since 2014. His work as The Arizona Republic’s consumer travel reporter aims to help readers navigate the stresses of traveling and get the best value for their money on their vacations. He can be reached at  [email protected] . Follow him on X, formerly Twitter:  @salerno_phx .

Support local journalism.   Subscribe to  azcentral.com  today.

Looking for a getaway? Here's a check list before booking a trip to Mexico

travel papers for mexico

Many Texans may look forward to having a fine time sipping margaritas during the week of spring break. 

Most spring breakers like to go to Mexico during that time due to our proximity to some relaxing beaches.

Where in Mexico could that be? Here’s what you need to know. 

Spring break travel destinations in Mexico

Mexico is a primary spring break destination for U.S. college students and working professionals. Many flock to one of the major resort towns near the coast. Those popular destinations are: 

  • Acapulco — At the southern tip of Baja California is Los Cabos, made up of the towns San Jose del Cabo and the more-popular Cabo San Lucas.  According to Trip Savy , you'll find well-known clubs like Cabo Wabo and Señor Frog's in town, along with several beach clubs spread across Medano Beach.
  • Mazatlán — Another hot spot for visitors, Mazatlán has one of the most famous breweries in all of Mexico, Cerveza Pacífico Clara (or just Pacífico), founded by German settlers in 1900. Since the city’s founding in the 16th century, fishing has been a major part of life in the area. Today, Mazatlán is home to the country’s second-largest fishing fleet.
  • Los Cabos — Los Cabos is a tropical paradise. Warm, mild days and cool evenings prevail from November through July. The rainy season in Cabo usually occurs from August through mid-October. The region receives an average of six to 10 inches of rain annually. 
  • Cancún — A sought-after resort area in Mexico. Cancún is at the tip of the Yucatan Peninsula, where the Gulf of Mexico meets the Caribbean Sea. Many of the hotels in Cancún and the nearby Playa del Carmen are all-inclusive, which is ideal for travelers who want to enjoy unlimited food and drinks at the pool.
  • Puerto Vallarta — Puerto Vallarta is a growing city . Its population has increased, on average, 7.56% annually. It’s also the capital of Mariachi music. 

Looking for an island getaway? These vacation destinations are safe for travel

Do I need a passport to fly to Mexico?

Flying to Mexico from the U.S. requires a passport to travel. If you're arriving by land or by sea, then you have some other options. If you don't have a passport, you can also use a passport card , which is cheaper than a passport but more limited.

Some U.S. states issue an enhanced driver's license that also qualifies for land or sea crossings. 

Safety tips if you're traveling to Mexico

Gang violence is a concern when traveling to Mexico, but most tourist destinations are safe. The only exception is Acapulco, which the U.S. State Department recommends not visiting.

Traveling to Mexico? See these travel advisories before booking your spring break trip

One way for travelers to stay safe is to not overconsume alcohol. According to Trip Savvy, the legal drinking age in Mexico is 18.

The National Institutes of Health also states that the Mexican government decriminalized small quantities of drugs for personal consumption, such as marijuana . However, if you're caught with an amount that goes over the very strict limit, even if it's for personal use, you can be imprisoned for trafficking. Even if you are below the limit, police have been known to arbitrarily force tourists to pay steep fines or risk going to prison, according to Fodor's Travel Guide .

More: US issues travel advisory for Jamaica, but it's not the only one. Here's a list

What items are prohibited from taking to Mexico?

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection has information on what items are prohibited and what else you need to know. Check with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) about importing any medications prior to crossing into Mexico.

Prohibited items include: 

  • Firearms and ammunition
  • “Over-the-counter” medicine in some U.S. states may be a controlled substance in Mexico. For example, pseudoephedrine, the active ingredient in Sudafed, is considered a controlled substance in Mexico.
  • Illegal drugs. Any type, in any amount, may result in serious fines, seizure of vehicle, federal record and/or imprisonment.
  • Switchblade knives, sea turtle boots or any other articles of endangered species (i.e. spotted cats, coral, crocodile, elephant, etc.)
  • Most fruits, including oranges and apples, and meats

What items are prohibited to bring back from Mexico?

Items like souvenirs, liquor and clothing can be brought back to the States. But items mentioned below are prohibited from being imported from Mexico, according to the International Trade Administration.

  • Predators of any size
  • Images representing children in a degrading or ridiculing way
  • Used clothes that are not part of personal luggage
  • Electronic cigarettes (as of February 2020)

Additionally, the USDA established criteria around fruits, vegetables, dairy, meat and other animal products. Foods may be prohibited if they have insects or diseases. See the full list of prohibited or restricted food items at https://help.cbp.gov/s/article/Article-3619?language=en_US .

Before you go to Mexico, ask a CBP Agriculture Specialist for a list of items you can bring back. Failure to declare agricultural items could result in up to $10,000 in fines and penalties, according to the CBP website.

You can also search using these:

Discover Mexico A-Z

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Trip planning, travel destinations, destination highlights, mexico lifestyles, living & lifestyle, lifestyle planning, real estate, healthcare & wellbeing, leisure assistance, lifestyle assistance, insurance coverages, property assistance, about mexperience, mexico essentials, discover more, mexico phasing out use of paper visitor permits (fmm).

Mexico’s immigration service has begun to phase out use of paper versions of the FMM—the multi-purpose visitor permits and arrival form

Paper FMM forms being phased out

For decades, people who’ve arrived in Mexico for leisure or business visits lasting 180 days or less, and who are passport holders of one of the many countries which don’t require a visa to enter Mexico, have completed a paper form known as Forma Migratoria Multiple (FMM) at the port of entry.

Multi-purpose paper arrivals form

In addition to being a visitor’s permit, the form is also used by those arriving with visa stickers in their passport issued by Mexican consulates abroad, particularly residency visas.

The half of the paper form that is stamped and given to you for safe keeping is used by visitors to exit the country, or as part of the process when you are apply to exchange your residency visa to a residency card.

The FMM form is sometimes issued to passengers by airlines, and they are also available at ports of entry.  If you apply for a FMM online , the current procedure requires you to print a paper copy and carry this with you when you come to Mexico.

Mexico’s paper FMM forms being phased out

Beginning the summer of 2022, Mexico started to phase out the paper version of the FMM forms.  As of now, many ports of entry across Mexico no longer use them.

However: the immigration rules, procedures, and time scales —for example the number of days you can stay in Mexico as a visitor, and the need to exchange a residency visa for a residency card— have not changed .

The phasing out of the FMM paper forms is happening on graduated basis.

If you are not issued with a a paper FMM when you arrive in Mexico, or asked to complete a paper FMM form when you’re resident in Mexico and leave the country, the immigration official will place a stamp in your passport, instead .

Whether a paper FMM is stamped and the visitor half given back to you, or whether you have no paper to deal with and a stamp is placed in your passport will depend on which Mexican port you enter or exit through—the changes are being rolled out on a gradual basis.

Eventually, all paper FMMs will be phased out and everyone will be given a stamp in their passport instead.

How to navigate the transition period

We are still learning about the changes taking place are updating this article as additional information becomes available.  Meanwhile:

If you arrive in Mexico as a visitor

  • Continue to complete a paper FMM form if it’s available at the port of entry.
  • If you apply online for a FMM, continue to follow the procedures stated on the online system.
  • If a paper version of the FMM is stamped and given back to you at the port of entry, keep this safe —you’ll need it to exit Mexico when you leave.
  • If you don’t get a paper version of the FMM, the immigration official will place a stamp in your passport instead , in lieu of the paper FMM. This will also be marked to show how many days you have been granted to stay as a visitor. You’ll need to show this page when you leave Mexico.

If you arrive with a residency visa in your passport

  • If you arrive in Mexico with a residency visa sticker,  continue to complete a paper FMM form if it’s available at the port of entry.
  • If a paper version of the FMM is stamped and given back to you, keep this safe . You will need to give this to the immigration office when you are exchanging a residency visa for a residency card.
  • If you are not issued with a paper FMM when you arrive in Mexico with a residency visa sticker, the immigration official will place a stamp in your passport instead , in lieu of the paper FMM, and will mark this with the word “ Canje .” Show this page to the immigration office when you go to exchange your visa for a residency card.

If you’re already resident in Mexico with a card

  • If you are already resident in Mexico and have your residency card remember that you need to register your departure at the port of exit before you leave.
  • Many ports are now stamping passports instead of using paper FMM forms to register residents’ departures and returns.
  • Continue to attend the immigration kiosk at the port of exit to register your departures and follow the guidance given by the immigration official at the port.

Immigration rules and time scales unchanged

Remember that the immigration rules and time scales  remain unchanged , for example:

  • The official at the port of entry will stipulate how many days stay in Mexico you have if you arrive as a visitor. This number will be written in your stamped passport instead of the on the FMM paper and will not exceed 180 days .
  • If you come with a residency visa in your passport, you have 30 days from the date of your arrival in Mexico to exchange your residency visa for a residency card.

Learn more about Mexico visas and immigration

Mexperience publishes extensive information about visas and immigration to Mexico, including:

  • Learn about  Mexico’s visitor permit, the FMM .
  • Read the FAQs related to Mexico’s FMM
  • Learn about the exchange procedure when you have a residency visa sticker in your passport
  • Learn about the entry and exit procedures at Mexican ports.
  • Discover the  principal routes for obtaining legal residency in Mexico

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The Best Travel Insurance for Mexico in 2024

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Allianz Travel Insurance »

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Seven Corners »

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Generali Global Assistance »

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Trawick International »

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WorldTrips »

Why Trust Us

U.S. News evaluates ratings, data and scores of more than 50 travel insurance companies from comparison websites like TravelInsurance.com, Squaremouth and InsureMyTrip, plus renowned credit rating agency AM Best, in addition to reviews and recommendations from top travel industry sources and consumers to determine the Best Travel Insurance for Mexico.

Table of Contents

  • Allianz Travel Insurance
  • Seven Corners

While Mexico is a lot closer to the United States than most other international destinations, that doesn't mean you don't need travel insurance. Travel to Mexico puts you at risk of many of the same perils you'll face in other parts of the world, including the prospect of becoming injured or ill during your trip, facing travel delays or flight cancellations , or dealing with baggage delays once you arrive.

Before you plan a relaxing getaway or adventure trip in a destination like Mexico City , Puerto Vallarta or Cancún , you'll want to have a travel insurance plan lined up and ready to go. Our advice? Start your search by comparing the following Mexico travel insurance plans and all they have to offer.

Frequently Asked Questions

Just like with other international trips, you should know that your own personal health insurance coverage will not apply in Mexico. The same is true if you have a government health plan like Medicare. (See our article on this topic for more information.)

At the bare minimum, you'll want to have travel health insurance that applies if you become sick or injured during your vacation. Other types of insurance coverage can also make sense for travel to Mexico, including coverage for trip cancellations, delays, lost baggage, missed connections and more.

Mexico travel insurance policies vary widely in terms of what they offer and how much coverage you get. Ultimately, you should compare plans side by side and make sure you're getting enough coverage for the type of trip you're taking and the specific risks you're taking on.

That said, common protections found in Mexico travel insurance plans cover:

  • Baggage delays
  • Emergency medical evacuation
  • Trip cancellation
  • Trip interruption
  • Travel delays
  • Lost luggage reimbursement
  • Medical expenses
  • Rental car damage

Some plans available for Mexico trips also include optional cancel for any reason (CFAR) coverage that reimburses you for part of your prepaid trip cost when you cancel your trip for any reason at all. Certain coverage options also provide protection for preexisting medical conditions if certain conditions are met, which is a factor you'll want to take note of if you or someone in your traveling party has a medical condition that could pose a problem on your trip.

  • Allianz Travel Insurance: Best Overall
  • Seven Corners: Best for Families
  • Generali Global Assistance: Best for Medical Emergencies
  • Trawick International: Best for Adventure Travel
  • WorldTrips: Best for Nomads and Remote Workers

Option to purchase CFAR and preexisting medical conditions coverage

Kids age 17 and younger covered for free

Lower coverage limits for medical expenses than some providers

  • $100,000 in coverage for trip cancellation (per traveler)
  • $150,000 in coverage for trip interruption (per traveler)
  • $500 in Trip Change Protector coverage
  • $50,000 in emergency medical coverage (per traveler)
  • $500,000 for emergency medical transportation (per traveler)
  • $1,000 toward baggage loss or damage (per traveler)
  • $300 in coverage for baggage delays of 12 hours or more (per traveler)
  • $800 in protection for travel delays per traveler (daily limit of $200 applies)
  • $100 per insured person, per day in SmartBenefits coverage for eligible delays
  • 24-hour hotline assistance
  • Concierge services

Optional CFAR and preexisting conditions waiver available

Coverage for up to 10 travelers in a single plan

Low coverage limits on Trip Protection Basic plan

  • Up to $500,000 in coverage for emergency medical expenses ($750 emergency dental limit)
  • $1 million in coverage for emergency medical evacuation and repatriation of remains
  • Trip cancellation coverage worth up to 100% of the trip cost (maximum $100,000 per person)
  • Trip interruption coverage worth up to 150% of the trip cost
  • Trip delay coverage worth up to $2,000 ($250 per person, per day)
  • $1,500 in coverage for missed cruise connections or tours (up to $250 per day)
  • $2,500 in coverage for baggage and personal effects (limit per item of $250)
  • Baggage delay coverage worth up to $500 (maximum $100 per day) after delays of six hours

CFAR and preexisting medical conditions coverages available

High coverage limits for medical expenses and evacuation

CFAR coverage only reimburses at 60%

Low emergency dental limit

  • Up to $1 million in coverage for emergency medical evacuation and transportation
  • $250,000 coverage limit for medical expenses ($500 limit for dental emergencies)
  • 100% of trip cost for trip cancellation
  • 175% of trip cost for trip interruption
  • $1,000 per person for travel delays ($300 per person daily limit)
  • $2,000 per person in coverage for baggage
  • $2,000 per person in coverage for sporting equipment
  • $500 per person for baggage delays
  • $500 per person for sporting equipment delays
  • $1,000 per person in coverage for missed connections
  • Air flight accident accidental death and dismemberment (AD&D) coverage worth $100,000 per person (maximum $200,000 per plan)
  • Travel accident AD&D coverage worth $50,000 per person (maximum $100,000 per plan)
  • $25,000 per person for rental car damage
  • 24-hour travel support
  • Identity theft resolution services

Coverage for 450-plus sports and activities

Generous benefits for emergency evacuation

No CFAR option available with this plan

No preexisting conditions waiver

  • Trip cancellation coverage for 100% of prepaid trip cost (up to $50,000)
  • Trip interruption coverage for 125% of prepaid trip cost (up to $62,500)
  • Trip delay coverage up to $1,000 for delays of 12 hours or more ($200 per day)
  • Inconvenience benefits worth up to $500 per trip
  • Medical coverage up to $100,000
  • $10,000 in coverage for search and rescue (not available in New York)
  • Up to $1 million in coverage for emergency medical evacuation
  • Up to $3,000 in coverage for baggage and personal effects
  • Baggage delay coverage worth up to $750 after a delay of 12 hours or more
  • Sports equipment rental coverage worth up to $5,000 (not available in New York or Washington)

Useful medical coverage for frequent travelers to Mexico

Potential for high coverage limits for medical expenses

No coverage for trip cancellation

Available coverage limits vary by age

  • Up to $250,000 in maximum coverage for illnesses and injuries
  • Up to $100,000 in coverage for emergency medical evacuation
  • $10,000 in coverage for political evacuation
  • $1,000 in coverage for emergency dental expenses
  • Up to a $20,000 lifetime maximum for repatriation of remains
  • $5,000 in trip interruption insurance
  • Up to $3,000 for lost checked luggage ($6,000 lifetime maximum)
  • Travel delay coverage worth up to $100 per day after delays of 12 hours (two-day maximum)
  • Personal liability coverage worth up to $25,000

Why Trust U.S. News Travel

Holly Johnson is a seasoned travel expert who has been creating content about travel insurance, cruises, all-inclusive resorts and more for more than a decade. She has visited more than 50 countries around the world and has an annual travel insurance plan of her own. Johnson also has experience navigating the claims process for travel insurance plans and has successfully filed several travel insurance claims for trip delays and trip cancellations more than once. Johnson works with her husband, Greg, who is licensed to sell travel insurance, and owns the travel agency Travel Blue Book .

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COMMENTS

  1. Mexico Tourist Card

    1. What is a Tourist Card and why I need it? If you are visiting Mexico you need a Tourist Card which is an Entry Immigration Form that details information about your visit to Mexico. The Tourist Card is per person regardless of age and how long you will stay in Mexico.

  2. What Documents Do You Need to Travel to Mexico?

    To return to the U.S. from Mexico by land, sea, or air, you must present a passport or PASS card (available to anyone) or Enhanced Driver's License (residents of some U.S. states can get these) at the border.

  3. Documents Required for Travel and Entry to Mexico

    If you are visiting Mexico and arriving by airplane, you must carry a current passport. Note that Passport Cards are not valid for air travel. We also recommend that your passport is valid for at least six months from the date of your arrival in Mexico. If your passport is expired the airlines will not allow you to board the aircraft.

  4. Mexico International Travel Information

    Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). See the State Department's travel website for the Worldwide Caution and Travel Advisories.

  5. Mexico Entry Requirements—For Leisure, Business or Residency

    If you have a passport that is valid for less than six months and you intend to stay in Mexico for a short period of time —perhaps a vacation— the Immigration Officer might allow you entry, especially if you can show a return air ticket.

  6. What documents do I need to enter Mexico?

    1. A valid passport or travel document. There is no need for a minimum period of validity of the passport (for example 6 months); but this document must be valid during the length of your stay in Mexico. 2. A properly completed Multiple Digital Migration Form (FMMd). This form will be provided to you by the airline or at the port of entry.

  7. Travel Documents You Need to Visit Mexico

    Passport: A passport is hands-down the best form of identification and proof of citizenship. It is highly recommended that you get a passport to travel to Mexico. If you'll be entering the country by air, it's necessary.

  8. Procedures for Entering and Leaving Mexico

    January 31, 2024 Procedures for Entering and Leaving Mexico There are some straightforward paperwork procedures to engage with when you arrive to, and depart from, Mexico. This article describes them by Mexperience

  9. Mexico Entry and Visa Requirements

    An electronic travel permit (officially called Sistema de Autorización Electrónica or SAE) is the easiest and quickest way to get permission to enter Mexico.To complete a SAE application, only the above documents are required and can be uploaded in digital format from anywhere in the world thanks to the online system.

  10. Online Entry Immigration Form for Mexico

    If you are visiting Mexico you need a Tourist Card which is an Entry Immigration Form that details information about your visit to Mexico. The Tourist Card is per person regardless of age and how long you will stay in Mexico.

  11. Instituto Nacional de Migración

    El Instituto Nacional de Migración (INM) a través de las Direcciones Generales de Control y Verificación Migratoria, Administración, así como Tecnologías de la Información y Comunicaciones, respectivamente es el responsable de los datos personales que sean recabados como parte de su registro en los procesos de internación y salidas del ...

  12. Crossing the United States-Mexico Border By Land

    Enter Mexico with valid proof of automobile registration, even if remaining in the border zone. Entering Mexico with an expired U.S. vehicle registration may lead to the confiscation of the auto by Mexican authorities. Last Updated: February 15, 2024 Información en español Download the Border Wait times app View Larger Map

  13. Entry Requirements and Customs in Mexico

    They are required to present a valid passport or passport card for travel beyond the "border zone" into Mexico, with the "border zone" defined as an area within 20 to 30km (12-19 miles) of the United States. The passport should be valid for, at minimum, 6 months from your time of arrival in country. All U.S. and Canadian citizens traveling by ...

  14. Travel documents and entry requirements

    Mexicans must present a valid and original photo ID (photocopied and digital documents are not accepted) Valid IFE/INE Passport Professional license IMSS or ISSSTE card INAPAM card Driving license Mexican military service card Foreigners must present a valid and original photo ID (photocopied and digital documents are not accepted)

  15. Mexico

    Reciprocity Schedule Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority. Explanation of Terms Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

  16. Are You Planning a Trip to Mexico from the United States?

    Call (956) 542-5811 in the U.S., 001800-0105237 from Mexico. Prohibited/Permissible Items All articles acquired in Mexico must be declared. $800 exemption for gifts and personal articles, including one liter of alcoholic beverages per person over 21 every 30 days. Cuban cigars are prohibited.

  17. Riviera Nayarit Mexico Tourist Entry Documents

    Mexico entry requirements stipulate that you will need the following 3 documents in order to enter Mexico: 1. Valid Passport. 2. FMT (Tourist, Business), FM2 or FM3 Form. 3. Custom's declaration form. The government of Mexico requires current proof of citizenship, a photo ID, and a valid passport for entry into Mexico. TIP: Carry a photocopy ...

  18. Entry requirements

    To leave Mexico, you must show your passport with the stamp showing the number of days you were allowed to stay. If you lose your passport, you must pay a fee to replace the entry stamp. The fee ...

  19. Traveling To Mexico From The U.S.: Requirements And Restrictions

    Yes, travel from the U.S. to Mexico is allowed. Mexico has kept its borders open to North Americans for a good portion of the pandemic. Currently, Mexico does not require any specific...

  20. Mexico travel advice

    Travel insurance. If you choose to travel, research your destinations and get appropriate travel insurance. Insurance should cover your itinerary, planned activities and expenses in an emergency ...

  21. Mexico Travel Advisory

    Reissued after periodic review with general security updates, and the removal of obsolete COVID-19 page links. Country Summary: Violent crime - such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery - is widespread and common in Mexico.The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico, as travel by U.S. government employees to ...

  22. Travel advice and advisories for Mexico

    Canada.ca Travel Destinations Mexico travel advice Exercise a high degree of caution (with regional advisories) Latest updates: The Need help? section was updated. Last updated: February 21, 2024 11:51 ET On this page Risk levels Safety and security Entry and exit requirements Health Laws and culture Natural disasters and climate Risk levels

  23. Is it safe to travel to Mexico for spring break 2024? What to know

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    Spring break travel destinations in Mexico Mexico is a primary spring break destination for U.S. college students and working professionals. Many flock to one of the major resort towns near the coast.

  25. Mexico Phasing Out Use of Paper Visitor Permits (FMM)

    Mexico's paper FMM forms being phased out. Beginning the summer of 2022, Mexico started to phase out the paper version of the FMM forms. As of now, many ports of entry across Mexico no longer use them. However: the immigration rules, procedures, and time scales —for example the number of days you can stay in Mexico as a visitor, and the ...

  26. The Best Travel Insurance for Mexico in 2024

    Other types of insurance coverage can also make sense for travel to Mexico, including coverage for trip cancellations, delays, lost baggage, missed connections and more.